Reviving our soils

Greenpeace India’s campaign against chemical fertilisers is also a campaign to bring our soils, destroyed by intense chemical fertiliser usage, back to life. The government through its policies to subsidise and promote chemical fertilisers has played a major role in bringing the situation to this extent. In fact the subsidies to chemical fertilisers, which is Rs. 50,000 crore this year and had gone as high as 1,00,000 crore in 2008-09, is the single largest financial support that our government gives to agriculture every year.

Through this campaign we are trying to expose the contradictions in the government’s policies which on one hand promise agricultural prosperity and food security and on the other kills our soils and threatens the sustainability of our farming. We are also building a powerful network of civil society organisations and farmer movements across the country that will collectively fight for a shift in paradigm of our agriculture.

Campaign Story:

Greenpeace India launched “Living Soils”, a nationwide campaign with a call to implement government policies to save soils from the harmful impacts of chemical fertilizers. This campaign assumes significance in the context of the Central Government acknowledging the agrarian crisis due to soil degradation and initiating a reform in its fertilizer subsidy policy. The campaign plans to organise a series of social audits in selected districts of Assam, Odisha, Madhya Pradesh, Punjab and Karnataka.

As part of the campaign we are demanding that the government

1. Creates an alternate subsidy system that promotes ecological farming and use of organic soil amendments.

2. Shifts the irrational subsidy policy for synthetic fertilisers to sustainable ecological practices in agriculture.

3. Re-focuses scientific research on ecological alternatives, to identify agro-ecological practices that ensure future food security under a changing climate.

The latest updates

 

Greenpeace staff member wins alternative Nobel Prize

Feature story | October 13, 2009 at 23:24

KINSHASA, Congo, The Democratic Republic of The — We are thrilled to announce that one of our staff members, René Ngongo, has today been named a recipient of the 2009 Right Livelihood award.

‘It is time for us to move against the political system and save our planet’

Feature story | September 29, 2009 at 3:30

Climate, it seems, waits for no one. So it was with filmmaker Shekhar Kapur, who was a Greenpeace volunteer for two days when he flew from sea level to the Himalayas and back, warning world leaders on climate change all the while. From the...

When the thermostat goes haywire

Feature story | August 28, 2009 at 3:30

Mumbai kids to Hillary “SOS - Stop Climate Change”

Feature story | July 18, 2009 at 3:30

MUMBAI, India — Children from the Bal Jivan Trust, who were visiting the Greenpeace Climate Rescue Station on Carter Road today, had a message for Hillary Clinton, Secretary of State, United States of America, asking that the world’s biggest...

Climate Change = Water Crisis

Feature story | July 17, 2009 at 3:30

DELHI, India — 25 Greenpeace activists queued up outside the Reserve Bank of India to deposit 100’s of pots of water for safe keeping to highlight the issue of the growing water crisis fuelled by climate change. The activists unfurled a banner...

Feeding a food crisis

Feature story | July 16, 2009 at 10:54

"In the context of the nation’s food security, the declining response of agricultural productivity to increased fertiliser usage in the country is a matter of concern… " emphasised Pranab Mukherjee, Finance Minister, as the Budget session came to...

Subsidising Food Crisis

Publication | July 6, 2009 at 16:22

After years of indiscriminate use, synthetic fertilisers are currently hampering the increase of food production in the country.

It’s anomaly reigning

Feature story | June 24, 2009 at 3:30

No doubt the monsoons are changing with the altering weather patterns. There is growing evidence suggesting that climate change is playing a significant role in altering the Indian monsoon patterns. What is not clear is how the precipitation...

No need for condoms – GE corn can do the job

Feature story | January 12, 2009 at 4:30

New research from Austria shows that a commercial strain of Monsanto-made GE corn causes mice to have fewer and weaker babies. What is this doing to human fertility?

More heavy rain, predicted

Feature story | July 30, 2007 at 12:10

Computer models of how our world will react to climate change have long predicted extreme and shifting weather patterns. More heavy rains in some areas, crippling drought in others. A new study, published this week in the journal Nature,...

51 - 60 of 91 results.