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George Bush leads the US toward a policy of unilateral, pre-emptive counterproliferation warfighting strategy.

Abolish nuclear weapons

The Cold War may be over, but this does not mean nuclear weapons have disappeared. Far from it: There are over 30,000 nuclear weapons in the world, with more than a thousand of them ready to launch at a moment's notice, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Over 400 reactors in warships and nuclear submarines are still circlingthe globe. Some are rotting away on the bottom of the ocean or in adistant port somewhere in Russia. Accidents such as the Russiansubmarine, the Kursk, tragically sinking in the Barents Sea can happenevery day, anywhere.

Over 2,000 nuclear weapons tests have left a legacy of global andregional contamination. People living near the test sites have sufferedfrom cancers, stillbirths, miscarriages and other health effects -- and are still suffering today. Manyhad to leave their hometown or island as it became too contaminated tolive there.

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The nuclear threat has quite literally scaled down in the last twodecades. While the prospect of an all out exchange of arsenals betweenRussia and the US has receded, the 15 kilotons of destructionthat obliterated Hiroshima could today be accomplished with a lunch-boxsized bomb. George Bush talks openly of developing new "more useable"nuclear weapons. Even more alarmingly, the administration continues toseek approval for a programme geared toward designing more robust, more'usable' nuclear weapons.

The prospects of a nuclear weapon actuallybeing used are perhaps greater today than during the cold war.

Today, the number of countries involved in active weapons programsis increasing. A growing number of countries are lining up to join thenuclear club, increasing the chance that a nuclear catastrophe willhappen somewhere on the planet. 

George Bush's war on Weapons of Mass Descruction had its firstconcrete result when the number of countries in the world with declarednuclear weapons increased to 8 from 7, when North Korea announced thatit had built "enough nuclear weapons to deter a US attack."

Nuclear brinkmanship is inevitable in a climate of nuclearhypocrisy. Only when all countries pursue nuclear disarmament in goodfaith can we begin putting the nuclear genie back in the bottle bybanning the use and manufacture of the nuclear materials at the heart of the bomb.

The only thing that will stop the threat is the voice of the second superpower: world opinion.

The latest updates

 

Time for Europe to stand up for peace - and renewables

Blog entry by Jennifer Morgan | 17 February, 2017 2 comments

Every year, the Munich Security Conference brings together the most senior decision-makers to debate critical issues in international security. This year, I will join them. And while I am sure I will disagree with most of the...

We are going to court!

Blog entry by Michelle Jonker-Argueta | 15 February, 2017 1 comment

It's time we hold governments accountable for their climate promises; we must protect the pristine Arctic - it's critical for the preservation of our planet for future generations. That’s why we’re taking Arctic oil to court. ...

Live long and protest: the power of mass action is alive in Romania

Blog entry by Irina Bandrabur | 14 February, 2017

At the beginning of this month, the biggest mass protest in Romania since the fall of communism in 1989 unfolded across the country. Hundreds of thousands of people in the capital, Bucharest, and every major city in Romania took to the...

I've seen the forest fires HSBC is helping to fund

Blog entry by Adi Prabowo | 13 February, 2017

The elderly gentleman approached me as our morning protest yesterday unfolded in front of HSBC’s Indonesian head office in Jakarta’s World Trade Centre building. Refusing the campaign postcard that I offered, his brow furrowed, he...

Missing the Target

Blog entry by Rex Weyler | 10 February, 2017 6 comments

The urgency to solve our climate crisis feels something like a ship heading off course: The longer you delay, the more you have to turn the wheel.   Consider these numbers: 2, 350, 1990. These were the original climate goals. In...

You did it! We’re Detoxing the Great Outdoors!

Blog entry by Edyta Sitko and Stefan Durrenberger | 6 February, 2017 2 comments

When we launched the Detox Outdoor campaign in late 2015 our goal was simple: Together with you, the outdoor community and Greenpeace supporters , we wanted to eliminate hazardous PFCs (chemicals used in weatherproofing outdoor gear).

PFC Revolution in Outdoor Sector

Publication | 6 February, 2017 at 9:00

PFCs are used in many industrial processes and consumer products, and are well known for their use by the outdoor apparel industry in waterproof and water-repellent finishes.

Why Trump’s Dakota Access and Keystone XL pipeline plans don’t add up

Blog entry by Jesse Coleman | 1 February, 2017

Last week, Donald Trump signed a set of presidential memoranda aimed at boosting the United States’ most infamous and flailing oil pipeline projects: the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) and the Keystone XL pipeline (KXL). Trump wants...

Why we need Netflix to join the race towards a green internet

Blog entry by Gary Cook | 27 January, 2017 1 comment

This month Greenpeace released our latest analysis (fifth and counting) of which major internet companies are leading the charge to build a renewably powered internet - and which ones are lagging behind. The good news: we see a...

The Amazon Reef: Brazil’s newly discovered and already threatened treasure

Blog entry by Thaís Herrero | 26 January, 2017 1 comment

We’ve launched a new campaign to defend the Amazon Reef, a unique and largely unknown biome that may be soon threatened by oil exploration In the far north of Brazil, where the Amazon River meets the sea, there is a...

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