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George Bush leads the US toward a policy of unilateral, pre-emptive counterproliferation warfighting strategy.

Abolish nuclear weapons

The Cold War may be over, but this does not mean nuclear weapons have disappeared. Far from it: There are over 30,000 nuclear weapons in the world, with more than a thousand of them ready to launch at a moment's notice, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Over 400 reactors in warships and nuclear submarines are still circlingthe globe. Some are rotting away on the bottom of the ocean or in adistant port somewhere in Russia. Accidents such as the Russiansubmarine, the Kursk, tragically sinking in the Barents Sea can happenevery day, anywhere.

Over 2,000 nuclear weapons tests have left a legacy of global andregional contamination. People living near the test sites have sufferedfrom cancers, stillbirths, miscarriages and other health effects -- and are still suffering today. Manyhad to leave their hometown or island as it became too contaminated tolive there.

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The nuclear threat has quite literally scaled down in the last twodecades. While the prospect of an all out exchange of arsenals betweenRussia and the US has receded, the 15 kilotons of destructionthat obliterated Hiroshima could today be accomplished with a lunch-boxsized bomb. George Bush talks openly of developing new "more useable"nuclear weapons. Even more alarmingly, the administration continues toseek approval for a programme geared toward designing more robust, more'usable' nuclear weapons.

The prospects of a nuclear weapon actuallybeing used are perhaps greater today than during the cold war.

Today, the number of countries involved in active weapons programsis increasing. A growing number of countries are lining up to join thenuclear club, increasing the chance that a nuclear catastrophe willhappen somewhere on the planet. 

George Bush's war on Weapons of Mass Descruction had its firstconcrete result when the number of countries in the world with declarednuclear weapons increased to 8 from 7, when North Korea announced thatit had built "enough nuclear weapons to deter a US attack."

Nuclear brinkmanship is inevitable in a climate of nuclearhypocrisy. Only when all countries pursue nuclear disarmament in goodfaith can we begin putting the nuclear genie back in the bottle bybanning the use and manufacture of the nuclear materials at the heart of the bomb.

The only thing that will stop the threat is the voice of the second superpower: world opinion.

The latest updates

 

A leader, a polar bear, and the shock of recognition

Blog entry by Anote Tong, President of Kiribati | 30 September, 2014

We had only been on the rock next to the melting Nordenskiöld glacier for a few minutes when I looked up and saw a white furry head looking down at me from a cliff 60 meters away. Our polar guide, who had scouted the area in...

"It's the Devil's excrement" - Where fossil fuels lurk, corruption creeps

Blog entry by Marina Lou | 29 September, 2014 1 comment

When it comes to resource extraction and the political process  — the issue is a global one. Have a look at some of the recent coal- ruption stories that have been breaking all around the world. Australia In the state of New...

That moment in New York City when the game of the climate movement changed

Blog entry by Martin Kaiser | 27 September, 2014

Who anticipated a turn-out like this? The largest political march in the US for over decade and it all took place in New York, home of the world's largest stock exchange, headquarters of international financial institutions and both...

Forests need laws, not loopholes

Blog entry by Kumi Naidoo | 25 September, 2014 2 comments

Sitting in the towering United Nation's building on New York's east side, it might be hard for world leaders to picture a destroyed forest, but I know just how depressing the site is. In Indonesia, and elsewhere, we've seen vast tracks...

Palm oil companies say they'll put forest destruction on hold. But what happens next?

Blog entry by Annisa Rahmawati | 25 September, 2014

Some of the world’s biggest palm oil companies have suspended their forest destruction. Is this a ceasefire or the end of their war on forests? We refuse to stand by while palm oil companies turn forests to plantations. We started...

Activists Block Coal Train in the UK

Slideshow | 24 September, 2014

Coal Power Plant Protests in Indonesia

Slideshow | 24 September, 2014

Coal: Darkness in the Lignite era

Blog entry by Rex Weyler | 24 September, 2014 1 comment

Coal, known as "King coal" or "black gold" for its historic economic influence, is also known as the "dirtiest fuel," the most carbon-intensive and toxic hydrocarbon. The industry has promoted "clean coal," but since they have...

Projection At The UN Climate Summit

Image | 23 September, 2014 at 18:00

Greenpeace USA activists project the message "Listen to the People, Not the Polluters" on the United Nations building, after hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets to demand climate action over the weekend. The projection was then...

Climate action – who is stopping us?

Blog entry by Kumi Naidoo | 23 September, 2014 3 comments

The world has changed since our leaders discussed climate change in 2009. It has become even more evident; ravaging crops in Africa, melting ice in the Arctic, drowning the Philippines and drying-up California. The poor are paying the...

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