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George Bush leads the US toward a policy of unilateral, pre-emptive counterproliferation warfighting strategy.

Abolish nuclear weapons

The Cold War may be over, but this does not mean nuclear weapons have disappeared. Far from it: There are over 30,000 nuclear weapons in the world, with more than a thousand of them ready to launch at a moment's notice, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Over 400 reactors in warships and nuclear submarines are still circlingthe globe. Some are rotting away on the bottom of the ocean or in adistant port somewhere in Russia. Accidents such as the Russiansubmarine, the Kursk, tragically sinking in the Barents Sea can happenevery day, anywhere.

Over 2,000 nuclear weapons tests have left a legacy of global andregional contamination. People living near the test sites have sufferedfrom cancers, stillbirths, miscarriages and other health effects -- and are still suffering today. Manyhad to leave their hometown or island as it became too contaminated tolive there.

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The nuclear threat has quite literally scaled down in the last twodecades. While the prospect of an all out exchange of arsenals betweenRussia and the US has receded, the 15 kilotons of destructionthat obliterated Hiroshima could today be accomplished with a lunch-boxsized bomb. George Bush talks openly of developing new "more useable"nuclear weapons. Even more alarmingly, the administration continues toseek approval for a programme geared toward designing more robust, more'usable' nuclear weapons.

The prospects of a nuclear weapon actuallybeing used are perhaps greater today than during the cold war.

Today, the number of countries involved in active weapons programsis increasing. A growing number of countries are lining up to join thenuclear club, increasing the chance that a nuclear catastrophe willhappen somewhere on the planet. 

George Bush's war on Weapons of Mass Descruction had its firstconcrete result when the number of countries in the world with declarednuclear weapons increased to 8 from 7, when North Korea announced thatit had built "enough nuclear weapons to deter a US attack."

Nuclear brinkmanship is inevitable in a climate of nuclearhypocrisy. Only when all countries pursue nuclear disarmament in goodfaith can we begin putting the nuclear genie back in the bottle bybanning the use and manufacture of the nuclear materials at the heart of the bomb.

The only thing that will stop the threat is the voice of the second superpower: world opinion.

The latest updates

 

A simple gesture to help protect the Arctic

Blog entry by Virginia Rabal | 2 May, 2015

OK so this week we've been talking about the OSPAR Convention , and the delegates who have the power to secure a Marine Protected Area in 10% of the future Arctic Sanctuary. All this is very interesting, but what can I do to let OSPAR...

The Rainbow Warrior heads to Vanuatu

Blog entry by Matisse Walkden-Brown | 30 April, 2015 2 comments

Since Cyclone Pam devastated Vanuatu and the Pacific in March, 75,000 people have been left in dire need of emergency shelter and other goods to restore their lives and homes. There are ongoing tireless efforts from many different...

How Shell's latest bid to get young people hooked on fossil fuels seriously backfired

Blog entry by Trillia Fidei | 29 April, 2015 1 comment

Shell knows it's losing the fight against Arctic drilling, and here's why. A few weeks ago, we got an email from an outraged filmmaker saying that he'd been invited to enter a viral video competition sponsored by Shell . The...

The best OSPAR movies in history

Blog entry by Sara del Río | 29 April, 2015

But... what does OSPAR, the Convention for the Protection of the marine Environment of the North-East Atlantic have to do with movies? During its 23 years of existence, OSPAR and its delegates have played a key role taking bold...

And the OSPAR goes to… the Arctic!

Blog entry by Pilar Marcos | 27 April, 2015

Yes, that is not a typo. The OSPAR Award. A long awaited Award that the Arctic well deserves. But, what is an OSPAR? The OSPAR Convention is an international agreement of 15 European countries (Arctic and non Arctic states)...

The giants who had no hearts in their bodies

Blog entry by Suzanne Kroger | 27 April, 2015

How some of palm oil's biggest players are actively working against reform. Fairy tales, like the Norwegian story The Giant Who Had No Heart in His Body are meant to teach us that no good comes of greed, and that redemption is...

Chernobyl, 29 years on: a race against time

Blog entry by Kendra Ulrich | 26 April, 2015 7 comments

Today, 26 April 2015, marks the 29th anniversary of the worst nuclear disaster in world history – the Chernobyl catastrophe. And unfortunately, preventing further major releases of radioactivity into the environment seems to be a race...

Renewable energy for all: How an Indian village was electrified

Blog entry by Kumi Naidoo | 25 April, 2015

Let's accept it. Climate change is a reality and current and future generations are up against the greatest challenge that humanity has ever faced. Yet some people believe that there is a trade-off between combating climate change and...

From Bangladesh to the world: Who made my clothes?

Blog entry by Yixiu Wu | 24 April, 2015

Two years ago today, one of the worst industrial incidents took place in Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh. Over 1,000 people died and over 2,500 injured when Rana Plaza, a clothing factory supplying global fashion brands, collapsed. ...

How do systems get unstuck?

Blog entry by Rex Weyler | 23 April, 2015 5 comments

Human enterprise appears stuck, like an addict, in habitual behaviour. We have plenty of data alerting us to global heating, declining species, disappearing forests, and rising toxins in our ecosystems. Yet, after decades of efforts to...

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