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George Bush leads the US toward a policy of unilateral, pre-emptive counterproliferation warfighting strategy.

Abolish nuclear weapons

The Cold War may be over, but this does not mean nuclear weapons have disappeared. Far from it: There are over 30,000 nuclear weapons in the world, with more than a thousand of them ready to launch at a moment's notice, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Over 400 reactors in warships and nuclear submarines are still circlingthe globe. Some are rotting away on the bottom of the ocean or in adistant port somewhere in Russia. Accidents such as the Russiansubmarine, the Kursk, tragically sinking in the Barents Sea can happenevery day, anywhere.

Over 2,000 nuclear weapons tests have left a legacy of global andregional contamination. People living near the test sites have sufferedfrom cancers, stillbirths, miscarriages and other health effects -- and are still suffering today. Manyhad to leave their hometown or island as it became too contaminated tolive there.

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The nuclear threat has quite literally scaled down in the last twodecades. While the prospect of an all out exchange of arsenals betweenRussia and the US has receded, the 15 kilotons of destructionthat obliterated Hiroshima could today be accomplished with a lunch-boxsized bomb. George Bush talks openly of developing new "more useable"nuclear weapons. Even more alarmingly, the administration continues toseek approval for a programme geared toward designing more robust, more'usable' nuclear weapons.

The prospects of a nuclear weapon actuallybeing used are perhaps greater today than during the cold war.

Today, the number of countries involved in active weapons programsis increasing. A growing number of countries are lining up to join thenuclear club, increasing the chance that a nuclear catastrophe willhappen somewhere on the planet. 

George Bush's war on Weapons of Mass Descruction had its firstconcrete result when the number of countries in the world with declarednuclear weapons increased to 8 from 7, when North Korea announced thatit had built "enough nuclear weapons to deter a US attack."

Nuclear brinkmanship is inevitable in a climate of nuclearhypocrisy. Only when all countries pursue nuclear disarmament in goodfaith can we begin putting the nuclear genie back in the bottle bybanning the use and manufacture of the nuclear materials at the heart of the bomb.

The only thing that will stop the threat is the voice of the second superpower: world opinion.

The latest updates

 

Primark joins the 5 Step Detox Programme

Feature story | February 10, 2014 at 11:30

Today, British retail giant Primark became the 20th global clothing company to commit to Detox. In doing so, they have taken up the challenge laid down to the fashion industry by people around the world to eliminate all hazardous chemicals from...

APP's forest conservation commitments, one year on

Blog entry by Zulfahmi | February 5, 2014

A year ago today, Asia Pulp & Paper committed to end its role in forest destruction.  It placed an immediate halt to all forest clearance and began the road to reformation, under the watchful eyes of Greenpeace and a host of other...

5 Greenpeace Facebook moments to remember

Blog entry by JulietteH | February 4, 2014

The social networking giant, Facebook, turned ten today, but what does that have to do with Greenpeace? Well, whether you’ve signed in or not, Facebook has become a prime mover in digital activism. It's played a role in, and...

Herakles Farms: "Investing in Africa"

Blog entry by Brendan Schwartz | February 4, 2014

Herakles Farms is a gem of a company claiming to "invest" in "sustainable" agriculture in Africa, in particular in a forested corner of the South West region of Cameroon. It's a crowded market, but what makes them so different? What...

How can we support sustainable development in Greenland?

Blog entry by Jon Burgwald | February 4, 2014 1 comment

In the small town of Aasiaat in Western Greenland, the sleigh dogs are becoming restless and fewer in numbers. Located on one of the many islands at the edge of the picturesque Disco Bay, the dogs have played an important role in...

Nuclear Protest in Budapest

Image | February 3, 2014 at 18:08

Greenpeace Hungary activists protest at Budapest’s Liberty Statue, against plans to expand the Paks 2 Nuclear Power Plant. Greenpeace calls on the Hungarian Parliament to withdraw their support for an extension of the nuclear plant. 2014-2-3

EU criticizes UK for state aid to new Hinkley C nuclear reactors

Blog entry by Greenpeace UK | February 3, 2014

For a full briefing on the Commissions comments please go to Energydesk. The European Commission (EC) has delivered what can only be called a scathing initial verdict on the UK Government’s deal with French state owned EDF to...

Choosing Amazon protection over greed, for now

Blog entry by Daniela Montalto | January 31, 2014 3 comments

We didn't know which way the axe would swing today, so to speak, regarding the extension of a landmark agreement about soya cultivation in the Amazon. And fortunately, it wasn’t the rainforest that got hit. Neither did the soya traders...

Amazon Soya Moratorium

Slideshow | January 31, 2014

Will a new lawsuit finally give some justice to the victims of Fukushima?

Blog entry by Justin McKeating | January 31, 2014 2 comments

A joint lawsuit filed in Tokyo this week offers a glimmer of hope that those responsible for the Fukushima disaster might finally face justice … The 1,415 plaintiffs, including 38 Fukushima residents and 357 people from outside...

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