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George Bush leads the US toward a policy of unilateral, pre-emptive counterproliferation warfighting strategy.

Abolish nuclear weapons

The Cold War may be over, but this does not mean nuclear weapons have disappeared. Far from it: There are over 30,000 nuclear weapons in the world, with more than a thousand of them ready to launch at a moment's notice, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Over 400 reactors in warships and nuclear submarines are still circlingthe globe. Some are rotting away on the bottom of the ocean or in adistant port somewhere in Russia. Accidents such as the Russiansubmarine, the Kursk, tragically sinking in the Barents Sea can happenevery day, anywhere.

Over 2,000 nuclear weapons tests have left a legacy of global andregional contamination. People living near the test sites have sufferedfrom cancers, stillbirths, miscarriages and other health effects -- and are still suffering today. Manyhad to leave their hometown or island as it became too contaminated tolive there.

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The nuclear threat has quite literally scaled down in the last twodecades. While the prospect of an all out exchange of arsenals betweenRussia and the US has receded, the 15 kilotons of destructionthat obliterated Hiroshima could today be accomplished with a lunch-boxsized bomb. George Bush talks openly of developing new "more useable"nuclear weapons. Even more alarmingly, the administration continues toseek approval for a programme geared toward designing more robust, more'usable' nuclear weapons.

The prospects of a nuclear weapon actuallybeing used are perhaps greater today than during the cold war.

Today, the number of countries involved in active weapons programsis increasing. A growing number of countries are lining up to join thenuclear club, increasing the chance that a nuclear catastrophe willhappen somewhere on the planet. 

George Bush's war on Weapons of Mass Descruction had its firstconcrete result when the number of countries in the world with declarednuclear weapons increased to 8 from 7, when North Korea announced thatit had built "enough nuclear weapons to deter a US attack."

Nuclear brinkmanship is inevitable in a climate of nuclearhypocrisy. Only when all countries pursue nuclear disarmament in goodfaith can we begin putting the nuclear genie back in the bottle bybanning the use and manufacture of the nuclear materials at the heart of the bomb.

The only thing that will stop the threat is the voice of the second superpower: world opinion.

The latest updates

 

The road to Arctic protection

Blog entry by Sara del Rio | 10 May, 2016 1 comment

Over the past year, many you have helped put pressure on OSPAR (the Oslo-Paris Convention) to stand up for Arctic protection. Since we started work on getting OSPAR to protect an area around the North Pole roughly the size of the UK...

Six months later: communities are still suffering from one of Brazil’s worst...

Blog entry by Alan Azevedo | 5 May, 2016

Six months have passed since one of the worst environmental tragedies in Brazil’s history: the Samarco dam collapse . On 5 November, 2015, Samarco’s mining waste dam gave way, releasing a torrent of contaminated mud that killed 19...

Ecological bankruptcy

Blog entry by Rex Weyler | 4 May, 2016 2 comments

There may not be a single large-scale industry or multi-national corporation on Earth that is genuinely profitable if they had to account for their ecological impact. A recent UN-supported report shows that the world's 3,000 largest...

4 reasons to tackle destructive fishing this World Tuna Day

Blog entry by François Chartier | 2 May, 2016

On World Tuna Day, the Greenpeace ship Esperanza is at sea stopping the destructive fishing practices of the largest tuna company on the planet – Thai Union – which owns popular tuna brands like John West, Petit Navire, Mareblu and...

5 helpful vegetarian diet tips for meat-free newbies

Blog entry by Rashini Suriyaarachchi | 30 April, 2016 2 comments

Cutting back on red meat and dairy can be one of the biggest steps to reduce your carbon footprint. While Greenpeace campaign for renewable energy and a transition from fossil fuels, we're also looking at other ways we can protect...

Recycling in Russia: The second life of old things

Blog entry by Violetta Ryabko | 29 April, 2016

Overconsumption is a big problem for some people in Russia. But they don't have access to a proper recycling system. Once a month, people have to carry their separate recyclables to a collection point that's run entirely by volunteers.

Farmers of the future need healthy land

Blog entry by Brecht Goussey | 28 April, 2016

Brecht Goussey is an organic farmer and runs a community-supported agriculture (CSA) farm in the area of Leuven, Belgium. What he struggles with most is access to healthy soil and affordable land to grow food for his local community.

From the heart of the Amazon to the heart of corporate power: how Indigenous...

Blog entry by Daniel Brindis | 27 April, 2016 1 comment

Today, Munduruku Indigenous representatives and activists traveled thousands of kilometres from the heart of the Brazilian Amazon to the annual shareholder’s meeting of General Electric (GE) in the United States. Their goal: to...

How birdwatching helps stop Thai Union's ocean destruction

Blog entry by François Chartier | 26 April, 2016 3 comments

"I have a visual at two o'clock!" We rush to the 'monkey island', the highest platform of the Greenpeace ship Esperanza, where watchers scan the ocean from sunrise to sunset. The ship changes course and heads towards the small floating...

Chernobyl's children of hope

Blog entry by Andrey Allakhverdov | 25 April, 2016 1 comment

The word nadeshda means hope in Russian. The Nadesha rehabilitation centre was founded to give hope to children living in towns and villages contaminated by the Chernobyl disaster. Thousands of children across Belarus have...

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