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George Bush leads the US toward a policy of unilateral, pre-emptive counterproliferation warfighting strategy.

Abolish nuclear weapons

The Cold War may be over, but this does not mean nuclear weapons have disappeared. Far from it: There are over 30,000 nuclear weapons in the world, with more than a thousand of them ready to launch at a moment's notice, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Over 400 reactors in warships and nuclear submarines are still circlingthe globe. Some are rotting away on the bottom of the ocean or in adistant port somewhere in Russia. Accidents such as the Russiansubmarine, the Kursk, tragically sinking in the Barents Sea can happenevery day, anywhere.

Over 2,000 nuclear weapons tests have left a legacy of global andregional contamination. People living near the test sites have sufferedfrom cancers, stillbirths, miscarriages and other health effects -- and are still suffering today. Manyhad to leave their hometown or island as it became too contaminated tolive there.

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The nuclear threat has quite literally scaled down in the last twodecades. While the prospect of an all out exchange of arsenals betweenRussia and the US has receded, the 15 kilotons of destructionthat obliterated Hiroshima could today be accomplished with a lunch-boxsized bomb. George Bush talks openly of developing new "more useable"nuclear weapons. Even more alarmingly, the administration continues toseek approval for a programme geared toward designing more robust, more'usable' nuclear weapons.

The prospects of a nuclear weapon actuallybeing used are perhaps greater today than during the cold war.

Today, the number of countries involved in active weapons programsis increasing. A growing number of countries are lining up to join thenuclear club, increasing the chance that a nuclear catastrophe willhappen somewhere on the planet. 

George Bush's war on Weapons of Mass Descruction had its firstconcrete result when the number of countries in the world with declarednuclear weapons increased to 8 from 7, when North Korea announced thatit had built "enough nuclear weapons to deter a US attack."

Nuclear brinkmanship is inevitable in a climate of nuclearhypocrisy. Only when all countries pursue nuclear disarmament in goodfaith can we begin putting the nuclear genie back in the bottle bybanning the use and manufacture of the nuclear materials at the heart of the bomb.

The only thing that will stop the threat is the voice of the second superpower: world opinion.

The latest updates

 

Trump as President: Here’s how we get through this

Blog entry by Annie Leonard | 16 November, 2016

I never thought I’d have to write this. The election of Donald Trump as President of the United States, has been devastating. He’s spent months threatening immigrants, women, people of colour, Muslims and the differently-abled...

“It's about the people, not about the products” - the faces of PFC pollution

Blog entry by Elske Krikhaar and Jeffrey Dugas | 15 November, 2016

Elske Krikhaar, Greenpeace International The first thing that went through my mind as I entered Jan and Ineke van Genderen’s living room was how close the DuPont/Chemours facility was. I could almost see it from the window. It is...

Citizen science in action: open-source air pollution monitoring in Bulgaria

Blog entry by Teodora Stoyanova | 14 November, 2016

Every day, we breathe in between 15,000 and 20,000 litres of air – enough to fill three hot air balloons in a year. This precious substance is made up of 78% nitrogen, 21% oxygen and 1% carbon dioxide. But what else is in the air we...

PFC Pollution Hotspots

Publication | 14 November, 2016 at 14:00

The manufacture of hazardous per- and polyfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) is leading to contamination of the local environment, including surface water, drinking water, groundwater as well as air and dust.

Russian gas in the EU: How consumers threaten an international nature reserve

Blog entry by Evgeny Yusov | 11 November, 2016

The Kurgalsky nature reserve, which traverses the shallow waters of the Gulf of Finland, numerous islands, and the Kurgalsky Peninsula between Russia and Finland, is home to a great diversity of flora and fauna, supporting numerous...

Smog is India's new Instagram filter

Blog entry by Sudhanshu Malhotra | 11 November, 2016 1 comment

India’s capital, Delhi, is right now the most polluted city in the world . According to a WHO report, 12 out of 22 of the world’s most polluted cities are in India. It’s a public health disaster, but it wasn’t always like this. ...

One year later and no justice: Communities affected by dam disaster speak out

Blog entry by Fabiana Alves | 8 November, 2016 1 comment

This past Saturday – 5 November, 2016 – hundreds of people gathered at the ruins of the Bento Rodrigues school in Mariana, Minas Gerais state, Brazil. They were there out of remembrance, and to call for justice. Exactly one year...

I survived the strongest typhoon to ever hit the Philippines. But my family didn’t.

Blog entry by Joanna Sustento | 8 November, 2016

Imagine this… “Super Typhoon Haiyan is moving over the Philippines this weekend bringing with it winds close to 200 miles per hour…” – ABC World News An elderly couple walk past rubble left by the damage caused by Typhoon...

4 ways you can use the law to call out the fossil fuel industry – join the wave of...

Blog entry by Tom Lowe | 7 November, 2016

The Paris agreement has catapulted us all into a new reality. Governments have signed it, now they must act on it. And meanwhile, a global movement of people against fossil fuels is moving ahead - and you can be a part of it. We are...

I was at eye level at the UN and the world moved

Blog entry by Naomi Ages | 5 November, 2016

It’s early in the morning on Friday 4 November and I am standing outside the United Nations in New York. A year ago, I was a relative newcomer to Greenpeace, preparing to attend the COP in Paris. The Greenpeace team was mobilising to...

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