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George Bush leads the US toward a policy of unilateral, pre-emptive counterproliferation warfighting strategy.

Abolish nuclear weapons

The Cold War may be over, but this does not mean nuclear weapons have disappeared. Far from it: There are over 30,000 nuclear weapons in the world, with more than a thousand of them ready to launch at a moment's notice, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Over 400 reactors in warships and nuclear submarines are still circlingthe globe. Some are rotting away on the bottom of the ocean or in adistant port somewhere in Russia. Accidents such as the Russiansubmarine, the Kursk, tragically sinking in the Barents Sea can happenevery day, anywhere.

Over 2,000 nuclear weapons tests have left a legacy of global andregional contamination. People living near the test sites have sufferedfrom cancers, stillbirths, miscarriages and other health effects -- and are still suffering today. Manyhad to leave their hometown or island as it became too contaminated tolive there.

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The nuclear threat has quite literally scaled down in the last twodecades. While the prospect of an all out exchange of arsenals betweenRussia and the US has receded, the 15 kilotons of destructionthat obliterated Hiroshima could today be accomplished with a lunch-boxsized bomb. George Bush talks openly of developing new "more useable"nuclear weapons. Even more alarmingly, the administration continues toseek approval for a programme geared toward designing more robust, more'usable' nuclear weapons.

The prospects of a nuclear weapon actuallybeing used are perhaps greater today than during the cold war.

Today, the number of countries involved in active weapons programsis increasing. A growing number of countries are lining up to join thenuclear club, increasing the chance that a nuclear catastrophe willhappen somewhere on the planet. 

George Bush's war on Weapons of Mass Descruction had its firstconcrete result when the number of countries in the world with declarednuclear weapons increased to 8 from 7, when North Korea announced thatit had built "enough nuclear weapons to deter a US attack."

Nuclear brinkmanship is inevitable in a climate of nuclearhypocrisy. Only when all countries pursue nuclear disarmament in goodfaith can we begin putting the nuclear genie back in the bottle bybanning the use and manufacture of the nuclear materials at the heart of the bomb.

The only thing that will stop the threat is the voice of the second superpower: world opinion.

The latest updates

 

A Box of Sea: Paving the way for a fairer fish and seafood market in Greece

Blog entry by Alkis Kafetzis | 2 September, 2016

How a small group of fishermen and consumers are creating an alternative marketplace for locally caught fish. Antonis is a low impact fisherman from Lesvos. He has been fishing since he was a child. In the last few years, the...

5 alarming facts about Amazon forest fires

Blog entry by Cristiane Mazzetti | 1 September, 2016

The Amazon is being burned. Here’s what you need to know. From July to November, it is fire season in the Amazon rainforest. But while fires can be a normal part of the life cycle in forests, most of the flames in the...

3 big reasons why we need ocean sanctuaries now

Blog entry by Magnus Eckeskog | 30 August, 2016 2 comments

Last Friday, US President Obama announced the creation of the  world’s largest ocean sanctuary , and today governments from all over the world are meeting at the United Nations in New York to develop a new treaty to save our oceans.

Nuclear testing is not a path to security and peace

Blog entry by Bunny McDiarmid | 29 August, 2016 1 comment

Today marks the International Day against Nuclear Tests.  Since 1945, more than 2000 nuclear tests have been carried out at more than 60 locations around the globe. Nuclear weapons were designed and tested to be the ultimate doomsday...

My Arctic Home

Blog entry by Clara Natanine | 25 August, 2016 2 comments

I live in Kangiqtugaapik (Clyde River) in the Canadian Arctic. Most people have never heard of my town. It's 450km north of the Arctic Circle with a population of roughly 1,000. We are isolated from much of the world, but we feel very...

Does your cafeteria serve ocean destruction?

Blog entry by David Pinsky | 23 August, 2016

Every time you eat in a restaurant, hospital, airport, a university cafeteria, or at even at a rock concert, it is likely that you are eating food provided by a large foodservice company. Sea of Distress, a brand new Greenpeace US...

Microbeads: How did companies respond?

Blog entry by Taehyun Park | 23 August, 2016

Remember THIS video? Back in July, Greenpeace East Asia ranked 30 global companies to see how they measured in terms of their commitment to phasing out microbeads – the tiny terrors that are often found in shower gels and facial...

Thanks Rio! The (climate) winners and losers of the Olympic Games

Blog entry by Shuk-Wah Chung | 22 August, 2016

We’ve watched them soar, sprint and swim. For two weeks the world has been gripped by the Games – we’ve celebrated the Gold wins, been perplexed by ultra-human feats and admired the tests of strength and endurance. And next month we’ll...

Why fixing your phone is one of the most empowering things you can do

Blog entry by Kyle Wiens | 19 August, 2016

Like most people, I don’t go anywhere without my phone. In the morning, its shrill alarm rouses me from sleep. During the day it bobs between my ear, my hand, and my pocket. At night, I hunt for Pokémon before putting it away on the...

The photos that inspired millions to take action

Blog entry by Sudhanshu Malhotra | 19 August, 2016 3 comments

On World Photography Day, Greenpeace celebrates the power of photography to inspire action and speak truth to power. It's a tough call to select 10 images from the more than 18,000 that Greenpeace has produced in the last 12 months...

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