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George Bush leads the US toward a policy of unilateral, pre-emptive counterproliferation warfighting strategy.

Abolish nuclear weapons

The Cold War may be over, but this does not mean nuclear weapons have disappeared. Far from it: There are over 30,000 nuclear weapons in the world, with more than a thousand of them ready to launch at a moment's notice, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Over 400 reactors in warships and nuclear submarines are still circlingthe globe. Some are rotting away on the bottom of the ocean or in adistant port somewhere in Russia. Accidents such as the Russiansubmarine, the Kursk, tragically sinking in the Barents Sea can happenevery day, anywhere.

Over 2,000 nuclear weapons tests have left a legacy of global andregional contamination. People living near the test sites have sufferedfrom cancers, stillbirths, miscarriages and other health effects -- and are still suffering today. Manyhad to leave their hometown or island as it became too contaminated tolive there.

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The nuclear threat has quite literally scaled down in the last twodecades. While the prospect of an all out exchange of arsenals betweenRussia and the US has receded, the 15 kilotons of destructionthat obliterated Hiroshima could today be accomplished with a lunch-boxsized bomb. George Bush talks openly of developing new "more useable"nuclear weapons. Even more alarmingly, the administration continues toseek approval for a programme geared toward designing more robust, more'usable' nuclear weapons.

The prospects of a nuclear weapon actuallybeing used are perhaps greater today than during the cold war.

Today, the number of countries involved in active weapons programsis increasing. A growing number of countries are lining up to join thenuclear club, increasing the chance that a nuclear catastrophe willhappen somewhere on the planet. 

George Bush's war on Weapons of Mass Descruction had its firstconcrete result when the number of countries in the world with declarednuclear weapons increased to 8 from 7, when North Korea announced thatit had built "enough nuclear weapons to deter a US attack."

Nuclear brinkmanship is inevitable in a climate of nuclearhypocrisy. Only when all countries pursue nuclear disarmament in goodfaith can we begin putting the nuclear genie back in the bottle bybanning the use and manufacture of the nuclear materials at the heart of the bomb.

The only thing that will stop the threat is the voice of the second superpower: world opinion.

The latest updates

 

#NutellaGate and the trade in deforestation

Blog entry by Suzanne Kroger | 18 June, 2015

By now you may have heard of #NutellaGate . Yesterday, the French Ecology Minister Segolene Royal urged people concerned about global warming and deforestation to stop eating Nutella because the famous chocolate and hazelnut...

The encyclical: spirituality and ethics join the climate debate

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When talking about climate change, ethical arguments have tended to be overshadowed by scientific, economic and political reasoning.  Of course, there are many good reasons to go after a strong and unequivocal climate agreement in...

I'm standing between Shell and the Arctic. Join me.

Blog entry by Audrey Siegl | 17 June, 2015

Today, First Nations artist and activist Audrey Siegl stood on a small boat, bravely confronting Shell's 300-foot-tall Arctic drilling platform in Canadian waters off the coast of British Columbia on its way to the Alaskan Arctic. This...

People vs. Oil

Slideshow | 17 June, 2015

Desperate whalers go north

Blog entry by John Frizell | 16 June, 2015

Late last week the Winter Bay, a freighter carrying 1,800 tonnes of fin whale meat – Iceland's entire catch from the 2014 whaling season – arrived in Tromso, Norway, 200 miles north of the Arctic circle. It will stay there until July...

Activists say ShellNo! as oil rig departs for Arctic

Blog entry by Dawn Bickett | 15 June, 2015

Today, Shell Oil's drilling rig – the Polar Pioneer – left port to drill in the Arctic. Shell received government permission to drill in the Arctic this summer despite its history of failures and safety violations, the Obama...

A record breaking dress exchange: One event in over 40 cities

Blog entry by Carolin Wahnbaeck | 13 June, 2015

Today, Greenpeace is throwing the biggest clothes swap party ever seen in Austria and Germany: In over 40 cities, from the Danube to the Danish border, more than 10,000 expected participants will exchange some 50,000 trousers, skirts,...

Of Seeds and Men: how a French farmer created a seed house

Blog entry by Pierre Dudout | 10 June, 2015

The magic of seeds has always fascinated me. As a child I liked to watch the beans growing in the garden, their bent stem gently emerging from the ground to defy the sun, opening up to deploy their first leaves in the wind. I would...

How loggers are destroying the Amazon — and getting away with it

Blog entry by Dawn Bickett | 9 June, 2015

The Amazon rainforest is the largest on earth. Its biodiversity is unparalleled, it is crucial to the stability of the global climate, and it is home to many indigenous peoples. But for its immense size and importance, the Amazon is...

Securing a better future for the oceans and for people

Blog entry by Kumi Naidoo | 8 June, 2015

Mamadou Sarr is a 54-year old Senegalese artisanal fisherman who has been working at sea for over 36 years. He entered the profession out of his love for fishing and the ocean, and has been supporting a family of eight with his daily...

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