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George Bush leads the US toward a policy of unilateral, pre-emptive counterproliferation warfighting strategy.

Abolish nuclear weapons

The Cold War may be over, but this does not mean nuclear weapons have disappeared. Far from it: There are over 30,000 nuclear weapons in the world, with more than a thousand of them ready to launch at a moment's notice, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Over 400 reactors in warships and nuclear submarines are still circlingthe globe. Some are rotting away on the bottom of the ocean or in adistant port somewhere in Russia. Accidents such as the Russiansubmarine, the Kursk, tragically sinking in the Barents Sea can happenevery day, anywhere.

Over 2,000 nuclear weapons tests have left a legacy of global andregional contamination. People living near the test sites have sufferedfrom cancers, stillbirths, miscarriages and other health effects -- and are still suffering today. Manyhad to leave their hometown or island as it became too contaminated tolive there.

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The nuclear threat has quite literally scaled down in the last twodecades. While the prospect of an all out exchange of arsenals betweenRussia and the US has receded, the 15 kilotons of destructionthat obliterated Hiroshima could today be accomplished with a lunch-boxsized bomb. George Bush talks openly of developing new "more useable"nuclear weapons. Even more alarmingly, the administration continues toseek approval for a programme geared toward designing more robust, more'usable' nuclear weapons.

The prospects of a nuclear weapon actuallybeing used are perhaps greater today than during the cold war.

Today, the number of countries involved in active weapons programsis increasing. A growing number of countries are lining up to join thenuclear club, increasing the chance that a nuclear catastrophe willhappen somewhere on the planet. 

George Bush's war on Weapons of Mass Descruction had its firstconcrete result when the number of countries in the world with declarednuclear weapons increased to 8 from 7, when North Korea announced thatit had built "enough nuclear weapons to deter a US attack."

Nuclear brinkmanship is inevitable in a climate of nuclearhypocrisy. Only when all countries pursue nuclear disarmament in goodfaith can we begin putting the nuclear genie back in the bottle bybanning the use and manufacture of the nuclear materials at the heart of the bomb.

The only thing that will stop the threat is the voice of the second superpower: world opinion.

The latest updates

 

Air, water, and climate – the triple whammy that ends China’s coal boom

Blog entry by Li Shuo and Kaisa Kosonen | April 11, 2014

This week, Beijing’s air pollution is way above safe levels again, the world’s largest coal company has been forced to change its water strategy , and the UN panel looking at options to act against climate change is expected to...

Years of Living Dangerously: on a screen near you now!

Blog entry by Andrew Davies | April 11, 2014 4 comments

If they don’t already care about climate change, then this might just be the thing that finally inspires and motivates your friends and family to. This isn’t just another Al Gore documentary , but admittedly, there are big names in...

How Germany is revolutionising its energy system. And who's standing in the way.

Blog entry by Karsten Smid | April 9, 2014 5 comments

As the UN climate panel meets in Berlin this week to finalise its report on options for combating climate change, here's how Germany is rising to the challenge. Rapidly reduce your reliance on coal? AND phase out nuclear power at...

Consumer power! Procter & Gamble decides to wash its bad palm oil away

Blog entry by Areeba Hamid | April 9, 2014 7 comments

About 400,000 emails to Procter & Gamble CEO. Thousands of phone calls to P&G offices around the world. Dozens of protests throughout the planet. 7300 Sumatran orangutans at risk of being made homeless. ...

P&G commits to No Deforestation

Slideshow | April 8, 2014

Knotty problems? There are solutions.

Blog entry by Stephanie Goodwin | April 8, 2014 1 comment

As Greenpeace launches Forest Solutions: An insider’s look at Greenpeace collaborations in forest regions around the world, Greenpeace B.C. Director Stephanie Goodwin offers her perspectives on forest-based collaborations. ...

Why the world's biggest coal company has backed down

Blog entry by Deng Ping and Harri Lammi | April 8, 2014 4 comments

Last year, Greenpeace decided to do something we had never done before during our 13 years of work in China: target and confront a state owned coal company. And not just any company. The biggest and boldest, a Chinese government...

How the tech industry can help save the climate

Blog entry by Kumi Naidoo | April 7, 2014

Connecting people across continents. Delivering breaking news. Enabling government transparency. Facilitating social revolutions. Stopping global warming? The Internet is capable of doing so much, but perhaps the idea that it can...

Tired of climate doom and gloom? Read this.

Blog entry by Kaisa Kosonen | April 7, 2014 2 comments

I bet you read the "news" last week. Climate change impacts are now everywhere and it's going to get much worse if we continue polluting our way into the future. It's frustrating. It's infuriating. And it makes you want to switch...

Forests Solutions

Publication | April 6, 2014 at 13:00

Forest Solutions: An insider’s look at Greenpeace collaborations in forest regions around the world spotlights case studies of Greenpeace collaborations with forest products companies that are producing on-the-ground change that the public and...

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