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George Bush leads the US toward a policy of unilateral, pre-emptive counterproliferation warfighting strategy.

Abolish nuclear weapons

The Cold War may be over, but this does not mean nuclear weapons have disappeared. Far from it: There are over 30,000 nuclear weapons in the world, with more than a thousand of them ready to launch at a moment's notice, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Over 400 reactors in warships and nuclear submarines are still circlingthe globe. Some are rotting away on the bottom of the ocean or in adistant port somewhere in Russia. Accidents such as the Russiansubmarine, the Kursk, tragically sinking in the Barents Sea can happenevery day, anywhere.

Over 2,000 nuclear weapons tests have left a legacy of global andregional contamination. People living near the test sites have sufferedfrom cancers, stillbirths, miscarriages and other health effects -- and are still suffering today. Manyhad to leave their hometown or island as it became too contaminated tolive there.

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The nuclear threat has quite literally scaled down in the last twodecades. While the prospect of an all out exchange of arsenals betweenRussia and the US has receded, the 15 kilotons of destructionthat obliterated Hiroshima could today be accomplished with a lunch-boxsized bomb. George Bush talks openly of developing new "more useable"nuclear weapons. Even more alarmingly, the administration continues toseek approval for a programme geared toward designing more robust, more'usable' nuclear weapons.

The prospects of a nuclear weapon actuallybeing used are perhaps greater today than during the cold war.

Today, the number of countries involved in active weapons programsis increasing. A growing number of countries are lining up to join thenuclear club, increasing the chance that a nuclear catastrophe willhappen somewhere on the planet. 

George Bush's war on Weapons of Mass Descruction had its firstconcrete result when the number of countries in the world with declarednuclear weapons increased to 8 from 7, when North Korea announced thatit had built "enough nuclear weapons to deter a US attack."

Nuclear brinkmanship is inevitable in a climate of nuclearhypocrisy. Only when all countries pursue nuclear disarmament in goodfaith can we begin putting the nuclear genie back in the bottle bybanning the use and manufacture of the nuclear materials at the heart of the bomb.

The only thing that will stop the threat is the voice of the second superpower: world opinion.

The latest updates

 

War and Money

Blog entry by Rex Weyler | 15 April, 2016 2 comments

"Who is doing this? Who is killing us? This great evil. How did it steal into the world? We were a family. How did it break up and come apart?" – Private Witt's thoughts, The Thin Red Line, by Terrence Malick.  Records from the...

Radioactive Chernobyl forest fires: a ticking time bomb

Blog entry by Anton Beneslavsky | 15 April, 2016 4 comments

For five years now I’ve been a member of the professional firefighting group of Greenpeace Russia staff members that is supported by well trained volunteers and I’ve travelled thousands of kilometres across Russia to extinguish fires.

Twelve Nobel Prize winners, a Beatle, and the Pope can't all be wrong

Blog entry by Nick Young | 15 April, 2016 1 comment

On 18 September 2013, two Greenpeace International activists were arrested during a peaceful protest in the Russian Arctic. A week later, the entire 30-member crew of their ship was in a Russian jail awaiting trial on charges of...

1000 art works and counting for Arctic protection

Blog entry by Ethan Gilbert | 14 April, 2016

One day, Albert Einstein – that grey-haired master of imagination and thinker of all things outside the box – had something to say. “Creativity,” he mused, “is contagious. Pass it on.” His theory of relativity must not have been the...

3 (unpalatable) facts you need to know if you eat sashimi

Blog entry by Yen Ning | 14 April, 2016

One in three pieces of sashimi is from fish caught by Taiwanese fishing vessels. If you eat imported seafood, chances are you’ve eaten Taiwan caught fish, so when we’re talking Taiwanese seafood, we’re talking about an industry that...

Made in Taiwan

Publication | 14 April, 2016 at 2:30

Illegality and criminal wrongdoing in Taiwanese fisheries are increasingly well documented. Yet too often these very serious problems are reported and dealt with by Taiwanese authorities as if they were isolated incidents - the responsibility of...

UN talks put wind in the sails of ocean protection efforts

Blog entry by Veronica Frank | 13 April, 2016

The world has started to develop a new treaty to protect ocean life. And the progress is encouraging! A new ocean treaty in the works right now may help protect two thirds of the world’s oceans and set up rules to create and...

Time for global business to stop profiting from Amazon destruction

Blog entry by Tica Minami | 13 April, 2016 2 comments

Huge hydropower dams in the Amazon rainforest aren't just bad for Indigenous communities, biodiversity and the climate – they're bad for the companies involved. Here's why. The Amazon is the world's largest remaining area of...

Damning the Amazon

Publication | 13 April, 2016 at 8:00

Brazil’s Amazon region, which includes most of the world’s largest remaining area of rainforest, is under attack by uncontrolled economic exploitation. Mainly as a result of industrial agriculture, cattle ranching, mines and infrastructure...

15 things you didn't know about Chernobyl

Blog entry by Celine Mergan | 9 April, 2016 4 comments

In the early morning of April 26th, 1986, reactor four of the Chernobyl nuclear station exploded. It caused what the United Nations has called "the greatest environmental catastrophe in the history of humanity." Chernobyl was the...

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