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George Bush leads the US toward a policy of unilateral, pre-emptive counterproliferation warfighting strategy.

Abolish nuclear weapons

The Cold War may be over, but this does not mean nuclear weapons have disappeared. Far from it: There are over 30,000 nuclear weapons in the world, with more than a thousand of them ready to launch at a moment's notice, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Over 400 reactors in warships and nuclear submarines are still circlingthe globe. Some are rotting away on the bottom of the ocean or in adistant port somewhere in Russia. Accidents such as the Russiansubmarine, the Kursk, tragically sinking in the Barents Sea can happenevery day, anywhere.

Over 2,000 nuclear weapons tests have left a legacy of global andregional contamination. People living near the test sites have sufferedfrom cancers, stillbirths, miscarriages and other health effects -- and are still suffering today. Manyhad to leave their hometown or island as it became too contaminated tolive there.

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The nuclear threat has quite literally scaled down in the last twodecades. While the prospect of an all out exchange of arsenals betweenRussia and the US has receded, the 15 kilotons of destructionthat obliterated Hiroshima could today be accomplished with a lunch-boxsized bomb. George Bush talks openly of developing new "more useable"nuclear weapons. Even more alarmingly, the administration continues toseek approval for a programme geared toward designing more robust, more'usable' nuclear weapons.

The prospects of a nuclear weapon actuallybeing used are perhaps greater today than during the cold war.

Today, the number of countries involved in active weapons programsis increasing. A growing number of countries are lining up to join thenuclear club, increasing the chance that a nuclear catastrophe willhappen somewhere on the planet. 

George Bush's war on Weapons of Mass Descruction had its firstconcrete result when the number of countries in the world with declarednuclear weapons increased to 8 from 7, when North Korea announced thatit had built "enough nuclear weapons to deter a US attack."

Nuclear brinkmanship is inevitable in a climate of nuclearhypocrisy. Only when all countries pursue nuclear disarmament in goodfaith can we begin putting the nuclear genie back in the bottle bybanning the use and manufacture of the nuclear materials at the heart of the bomb.

The only thing that will stop the threat is the voice of the second superpower: world opinion.

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People tend to forget that coal’s reach goes far beyond the place where it is mined. How its harmful emissions don’t just reach across the sky, but its product also moves across our oceans and seas. The World Coal Association ...

How tiny plastic people protested around the world

Blog entry by Sara Ayech | 3 July, 2014

The news of LEGO's cosy relationship with Shell has led to tiny protests erupting around the world. Famous national and international landmarks have been festooned with banners as the streets resounded the stamp of little plastic...

Boiling Point: Multiple Crises and the Democratic Deficit

Blog entry by Kumi Naidoo | 2 July, 2014

Kumi Naidoo, the International Executive Director of Greenpeace, has been a leader in human rights, social justice, and environmental activism for over three decades. Allen White of the Tellus Institute interviews Naidoo about how to...

It's time for LEGO to block Shell

Blog entry by Ian Duff | 1 July, 2014 8 comments

Imagine you're eight years old and picture the Arctic. There are no oil rigs, no industrial shipping and no politicians fighting over it. It's just an endless sparkling expanse of sea and ice, populated by brave scientific explorers...

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Blog entry by Amy Moas | 27 June, 2014

The global palm oil industry is at a critical juncture. In 2012 we published a report that outlined how Africa is a new frontier for industrial palm oil production . This may bring much needed development to the continent, but it...

TEPCO senior management still out of touch with their victims

Blog entry by Hisayo Takada | 27 June, 2014 2 comments

It has often been pointed out that TEPCO has been badly managed for years and that it caused the triple meltdown of its reactors at Fukushima Daiichi. So, I attended the 90 th Annual General Meeting of TEPCO to see if management has...

What we've achieved together - the 2 year anniversary of Save the Arctic

Blog entry by Ana Mules | 26 June, 2014

It's pretty flat out on the Arctic campaign these days and there often isn't much time to stop and reflect on things. But if the 2 year anniversary of what is possibly the defining environmental battleground of our time, and the...

Waiting for the Great Leap Forwards

Blog entry by Richard Page | 26 June, 2014

Recently, after sifting through a box of dusty 45s, I have had a Billy Bragg song, Waiting for the Great Leap Forwards , firmly stuck in my head. The song has lodged itself there, not just because it has a nifty piano hook, but...

7 Green ways to watch the World Cup

Blog entry by Tom Dowdall | 26 June, 2014

So like most of us, you also couldn't make it to Brazil to enjoy the global football fest in person? Well, take comfort in the fact that you are not contributing to the carbon emissions of traveling to Brazil to catch the games!

A Brief History of Europe's Energy Troubles

Feature story | 25 June, 2014 at 11:00

The Ukraine crisis currently shows just how dependent Europe is, especially on Russian oil and gas. The EU spent a total of EUR 421 billion on energy imports in 2012.

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