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George Bush leads the US toward a policy of unilateral, pre-emptive counterproliferation warfighting strategy.

Abolish nuclear weapons

The Cold War may be over, but this does not mean nuclear weapons have disappeared. Far from it: There are over 30,000 nuclear weapons in the world, with more than a thousand of them ready to launch at a moment's notice, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Over 400 reactors in warships and nuclear submarines are still circlingthe globe. Some are rotting away on the bottom of the ocean or in adistant port somewhere in Russia. Accidents such as the Russiansubmarine, the Kursk, tragically sinking in the Barents Sea can happenevery day, anywhere.

Over 2,000 nuclear weapons tests have left a legacy of global andregional contamination. People living near the test sites have sufferedfrom cancers, stillbirths, miscarriages and other health effects -- and are still suffering today. Manyhad to leave their hometown or island as it became too contaminated tolive there.

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The nuclear threat has quite literally scaled down in the last twodecades. While the prospect of an all out exchange of arsenals betweenRussia and the US has receded, the 15 kilotons of destructionthat obliterated Hiroshima could today be accomplished with a lunch-boxsized bomb. George Bush talks openly of developing new "more useable"nuclear weapons. Even more alarmingly, the administration continues toseek approval for a programme geared toward designing more robust, more'usable' nuclear weapons.

The prospects of a nuclear weapon actuallybeing used are perhaps greater today than during the cold war.

Today, the number of countries involved in active weapons programsis increasing. A growing number of countries are lining up to join thenuclear club, increasing the chance that a nuclear catastrophe willhappen somewhere on the planet. 

George Bush's war on Weapons of Mass Descruction had its firstconcrete result when the number of countries in the world with declarednuclear weapons increased to 8 from 7, when North Korea announced thatit had built "enough nuclear weapons to deter a US attack."

Nuclear brinkmanship is inevitable in a climate of nuclearhypocrisy. Only when all countries pursue nuclear disarmament in goodfaith can we begin putting the nuclear genie back in the bottle bybanning the use and manufacture of the nuclear materials at the heart of the bomb.

The only thing that will stop the threat is the voice of the second superpower: world opinion.

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To protect forests and free speech, lend your voice (literally!)

Blog entry by Jill Pape | 24 May, 2017 3 comments

Can you imagine a world where Greenpeace and other advocacy groups are no longer able to stand up for our forests, oceans and climate? A giant logging corporation called Resolute Forest Products is fighting to make this sinister vision...

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Blog entry by Chiara Campione | 11 May, 2017 3 comments

This week, representatives from all the major brands - from fast fashion retailers like H&M, Asos and Zara, through to luxury labels like Burberry and Swarowski - are gathering in Copenhagen to discuss sustainability in the global...

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Blog entry by Molly Dorozenski | 9 May, 2017 1 comment

Free speech is a right. So how can a corporation possibly stop you from speaking out? Using a legal tactic called a SLAPP , corporations like the massive Canadian logging company, Resolute Forest Products, are attempting to crack down...

Shopping doesn’t make us happy

Blog entry by Frances Lo | 8 May, 2017 3 comments

Do your clothes make you happy? Or, after the excitement of the shopping spree fades, does your new stuff tend to lose its in-store magic by the time it’s reached your wardrobe?   A new survey of international buying habits has...

After the Binge the Hangover

Publication | 8 May, 2017 at 12:00

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Blog entry by Alexey Yaroshenko | 5 May, 2017

Speaking truth to corporations has been the backbone of Greenpeace’s global forest campaign for over two decades. Putting pressure on companies buying products from forest destruction has successfully helped protect the Great Bear...

Nuclear power and the collapse of society

Blog entry by Rex Weyler | 5 May, 2017 14 comments

On March 1 1954, on Bikini Atoll, in the Marshall Islands, the US military detonated the world’s first lithium-deuteride hydrogen bomb, a thousand times more powerful than the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs. The radiation blew downwind,...

The beauty of West Africa’s ocean is overwhelming

Blog entry by Pavel Klinckhamers | 4 May, 2017

Sailing across the nutrient rich waters of the West African Atlantic Ocean these past two months, I have been lucky enough to see an incredible array of wildlife. Whales, dolphins and pelicans, I have met them all in this trip. And I...

Sending wild caribou to a zoo?

Blog entry by Eduardo Sousa | 3 May, 2017

In Canada, recent government decisions to address declining caribou populations are truly dumbfounding. We live in very odd times. We have politicians in powerful positions around the world who wish to take us back to the...

Major palm oil company promises to protect forests

Blog entry by Annisa Rahmawati | 28 April, 2017

There's been a major development in our campaign to protect Indonesia's forests. IOI, one of the largest palm oil traders in the world, has just made a significant commitment to protect rainforests . If put into practice, this...

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