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George Bush leads the US toward a policy of unilateral, pre-emptive counterproliferation warfighting strategy.

Abolish nuclear weapons

The Cold War may be over, but this does not mean nuclear weapons have disappeared. Far from it: There are over 30,000 nuclear weapons in the world, with more than a thousand of them ready to launch at a moment's notice, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Over 400 reactors in warships and nuclear submarines are still circlingthe globe. Some are rotting away on the bottom of the ocean or in adistant port somewhere in Russia. Accidents such as the Russiansubmarine, the Kursk, tragically sinking in the Barents Sea can happenevery day, anywhere.

Over 2,000 nuclear weapons tests have left a legacy of global andregional contamination. People living near the test sites have sufferedfrom cancers, stillbirths, miscarriages and other health effects -- and are still suffering today. Manyhad to leave their hometown or island as it became too contaminated tolive there.

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The nuclear threat has quite literally scaled down in the last twodecades. While the prospect of an all out exchange of arsenals betweenRussia and the US has receded, the 15 kilotons of destructionthat obliterated Hiroshima could today be accomplished with a lunch-boxsized bomb. George Bush talks openly of developing new "more useable"nuclear weapons. Even more alarmingly, the administration continues toseek approval for a programme geared toward designing more robust, more'usable' nuclear weapons.

The prospects of a nuclear weapon actuallybeing used are perhaps greater today than during the cold war.

Today, the number of countries involved in active weapons programsis increasing. A growing number of countries are lining up to join thenuclear club, increasing the chance that a nuclear catastrophe willhappen somewhere on the planet. 

George Bush's war on Weapons of Mass Descruction had its firstconcrete result when the number of countries in the world with declarednuclear weapons increased to 8 from 7, when North Korea announced thatit had built "enough nuclear weapons to deter a US attack."

Nuclear brinkmanship is inevitable in a climate of nuclearhypocrisy. Only when all countries pursue nuclear disarmament in goodfaith can we begin putting the nuclear genie back in the bottle bybanning the use and manufacture of the nuclear materials at the heart of the bomb.

The only thing that will stop the threat is the voice of the second superpower: world opinion.

The latest updates

 

It is simple: It is People Power

Blog entry by Paula Tejón Carbajal | 7 November, 2014 7 comments

A shift to a cleaner and brighter energy future is not just a matter of technology or economics anymore. It is also a matter of political will. And although our leaders don't seem to get it, people do. The recent boom of renewable...

Japanese Governor Ito ignores lessons of Fukushima to approve the Sendai reactor restarts

Blog entry by Shaun Burnie | 7 November, 2014 3 comments

Governor Ito of Kagoshima, today bent to the will of the nuclear industry in granting approval for the highly contentious restart of the two Sendai nuclear reactors. In an effort to avoid full responsibility for the decision he was...

To carry on the David and Goliath battle we must stand together

Blog entry by Anna Abad | 7 November, 2014

On November 8, 2013 the world stood still and witnessed the largest tropical cyclone ever recorded in history make landfall in Tacloban, Philippines. The scale and magnitude of the damage it left behind was unprecedented and shocking,...

This timber must be seized, not sold

Blog entry by Daniela Montalto | 6 November, 2014 4 comments

Today, in waters outside of a Rotterdam port, activists continued tracking illegally sourced timber arriving from the Brazilian Amazon. They confronted a French flagged ship coming from a sawmill dealing illegal timber destined for...

'Greenpeace Energy': 15 years of clean power

Blog entry by Andrew Kerr | 6 November, 2014

A notable anniversary passed us by last week while our focus was on the UN climate panel finalising its latest assessment of climate change and highlighting how clean energy can get the world out of this mess. Germany's first and...

Payback time for the big polluters?

Blog entry by Kristin Casper | 5 November, 2014

The 500,000 people who marched for the climate in New York and other major cities in September have passed the torch to the people in the Philippines. The People's Climate Walk is a 40-day, 1000 km journey from Manila to ground zero in...

The answer to alarming climate science: 100% renewable energy

Blog entry by Anna Leidreiter and Kaisa Kosonen | 31 October, 2014 2 comments

Back in the 1970s dedicated and resourceful Danes made a choice to take control of their energy, turning their backs on nuclear and embracing a renewable energy by building their own wind turbines. It started a true revolution. Now...

Learning the tragic lesson of Fukushima: No nuclear restart at Sendai

Blog entry by Jan Vande Putte | 31 October, 2014 20 comments

In March 2011, Japan suffered the worst nuclear catastrophe in a generation, with triple reactor core meltdowns and exploded containment buildings at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The catastrophe was a stern warning...

Month In Pictures - October

Slideshow | 31 October, 2014

This 'boom' might save the world - 10 quick facts about renewable energy

Blog entry by Kaisa Kosonen | 30 October, 2014 4 comments

As the world's leading climate scientists finalise the latest and most comprehensive report on climate change and ways to tackle it, a key question is: What is new? What has changed since the release of the UN climate panel's last...

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