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George Bush leads the US toward a policy of unilateral, pre-emptive counterproliferation warfighting strategy.

Abolish nuclear weapons

The Cold War may be over, but this does not mean nuclear weapons have disappeared. Far from it: There are over 30,000 nuclear weapons in the world, with more than a thousand of them ready to launch at a moment's notice, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Over 400 reactors in warships and nuclear submarines are still circlingthe globe. Some are rotting away on the bottom of the ocean or in adistant port somewhere in Russia. Accidents such as the Russiansubmarine, the Kursk, tragically sinking in the Barents Sea can happenevery day, anywhere.

Over 2,000 nuclear weapons tests have left a legacy of global andregional contamination. People living near the test sites have sufferedfrom cancers, stillbirths, miscarriages and other health effects -- and are still suffering today. Manyhad to leave their hometown or island as it became too contaminated tolive there.

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The nuclear threat has quite literally scaled down in the last twodecades. While the prospect of an all out exchange of arsenals betweenRussia and the US has receded, the 15 kilotons of destructionthat obliterated Hiroshima could today be accomplished with a lunch-boxsized bomb. George Bush talks openly of developing new "more useable"nuclear weapons. Even more alarmingly, the administration continues toseek approval for a programme geared toward designing more robust, more'usable' nuclear weapons.

The prospects of a nuclear weapon actuallybeing used are perhaps greater today than during the cold war.

Today, the number of countries involved in active weapons programsis increasing. A growing number of countries are lining up to join thenuclear club, increasing the chance that a nuclear catastrophe willhappen somewhere on the planet. 

George Bush's war on Weapons of Mass Descruction had its firstconcrete result when the number of countries in the world with declarednuclear weapons increased to 8 from 7, when North Korea announced thatit had built "enough nuclear weapons to deter a US attack."

Nuclear brinkmanship is inevitable in a climate of nuclearhypocrisy. Only when all countries pursue nuclear disarmament in goodfaith can we begin putting the nuclear genie back in the bottle bybanning the use and manufacture of the nuclear materials at the heart of the bomb.

The only thing that will stop the threat is the voice of the second superpower: world opinion.

The latest updates

 

The #Cofrentes17 are part of Spain's great tradition of nuclear resistance

Blog entry by Jan Haverkamp | 2 December, 2014 16 comments

A month before the Fukushima catastrophe began in 2011, Greenpeace activists occupied one of Cofrentes' cooling towers and painted "Peligro Nuclear" on its side: Nuclear Danger. On 28 November, dozens of academics and people from...

A rainbow from Machu Picchu to Düsseldorf

Blog entry by Sven Teske | 1 December, 2014 1 comment

Peru! What comes to mind when you think of Peru? Right! The mysterious Inca ruins of Machu Picchu, which attract and inspire so many people from around the world, and still have scientists puzzling over their origin. Last night,...

Monster boats: More than an environmental injustice

Blog entry by Angela Lazou Dean | 28 November, 2014 1 comment

Inspired by the touching stories of the small low impact fishers around the globe being impacted by monster boats, I recently decided to look into the definition of environmental justice. While I discovered that there is no...

Lima: A positive end to a breakthrough year for the climate movement?

Blog entry by Daniel Mittler | 28 November, 2014 6 comments

There is no question: 2014 has been a key year for the politics of climate change already, even before the latest round of climate talks get under way in Lima, Peru, next week. This is the year that you, and people like you, turned ...

I'm a vaquita and I'm in danger

Blog entry by Vaquita 97 | 28 November, 2014

To you who reads me: My name is Vaquita 97. Few people know me, few have heard of me and fewer people have seen me. In order for you to imagine me, I’ll say I look like a dolphin but smaller, I’m a marine porpoise. Some say I...

17 nuclear headaches

Blog entry by Raquel Montón | 28 November, 2014

"It was my duty to do this and I did it." These are the words of one of our Greenpeace activists when he was prosecuted last September for the peaceful protest at the nuclear power plant of Fessenheim in France. These thoughts are...

Government spying undermines climate action

Blog entry by Andrew Kerr | 27 November, 2014 1 comment

Unless you’ve been living in a hole in the ground or in a galaxy far, far away you won’t have missed media revelations about government security services snooping on our every communication. Personal phone calls and e-mails are...

Saving peatland with the President

Blog entry by Longgena Ginting | 27 November, 2014 3 comments

Today we made history in the protection of Indonesian peatlands. I’ve just got back from a monitoring trip to Sumatra’s devastated peatland forests with Indonesia’s new president Jokowi, where the president witnessed firsthand ongoing...

The Soya Moratorium lives on – but what will follow after it?

Blog entry by Richard George | 26 November, 2014 3 comments

For eight years, the Soya Moratorium has protected the Amazon rainforest from deforestation. It has just been renewed for the eighth time . But what happens when it ends for good, 18 months from now? The Soya Moratorium was...

Momentum builds for No Deforestation palm oil

Blog entry by Suzanne Kroger | 25 November, 2014 4 comments

By now you know the problem: a rapidly expanding palm oil industry, eating up forests, draining carbon-rich peatlands, and sparking conflict with local people and workers. But if you had to guess at what is turning out to be a key...

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