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George Bush leads the US toward a policy of unilateral, pre-emptive counterproliferation warfighting strategy.

Abolish nuclear weapons

The Cold War may be over, but this does not mean nuclear weapons have disappeared. Far from it: There are over 30,000 nuclear weapons in the world, with more than a thousand of them ready to launch at a moment's notice, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Over 400 reactors in warships and nuclear submarines are still circlingthe globe. Some are rotting away on the bottom of the ocean or in adistant port somewhere in Russia. Accidents such as the Russiansubmarine, the Kursk, tragically sinking in the Barents Sea can happenevery day, anywhere.

Over 2,000 nuclear weapons tests have left a legacy of global andregional contamination. People living near the test sites have sufferedfrom cancers, stillbirths, miscarriages and other health effects -- and are still suffering today. Manyhad to leave their hometown or island as it became too contaminated tolive there.

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The nuclear threat has quite literally scaled down in the last twodecades. While the prospect of an all out exchange of arsenals betweenRussia and the US has receded, the 15 kilotons of destructionthat obliterated Hiroshima could today be accomplished with a lunch-boxsized bomb. George Bush talks openly of developing new "more useable"nuclear weapons. Even more alarmingly, the administration continues toseek approval for a programme geared toward designing more robust, more'usable' nuclear weapons.

The prospects of a nuclear weapon actuallybeing used are perhaps greater today than during the cold war.

Today, the number of countries involved in active weapons programsis increasing. A growing number of countries are lining up to join thenuclear club, increasing the chance that a nuclear catastrophe willhappen somewhere on the planet. 

George Bush's war on Weapons of Mass Descruction had its firstconcrete result when the number of countries in the world with declarednuclear weapons increased to 8 from 7, when North Korea announced thatit had built "enough nuclear weapons to deter a US attack."

Nuclear brinkmanship is inevitable in a climate of nuclearhypocrisy. Only when all countries pursue nuclear disarmament in goodfaith can we begin putting the nuclear genie back in the bottle bybanning the use and manufacture of the nuclear materials at the heart of the bomb.

The only thing that will stop the threat is the voice of the second superpower: world opinion.

The latest updates

 

Time to power up your future

Blog entry by Cristiana De Lia | 11 August, 2015

Just three weeks ago we asked you to stand with us to protect our Mediterranean from the threat of dirty and dangerous fossil fuels. And to share our vision of a pristine solar paradise. So much has happened since then. Here are a...

Our first tuna ship contact

Blog entry by Rainbow Warrior | 7 August, 2015 1 comment

The Pacific is a big ocean. You can sail for days without seeing another ship (as we just did). But now we're in the fishing grounds, and starting to spot fishing vessels. Knowing where to go There're some things you can't know...

Desperately Seeking: South Pacific Albacore tuna

Blog entry by Dr. Cat Dorey | 7 August, 2015 1 comment

There's a tendency, outside my science world at least, to talk about 'tuna' as if it was one species of fish. In fact tuna is a generic name for a whole bunch of tuna and mackerel species. As well as the main commercial species of...

How a lizard and a snake beat king coal

Blog entry by Elsa Lee | 7 August, 2015 4 comments

This week two major wins came out of the campaign to protect Australia's Great Barrier Reef. But the fight is not over… When news broke of Australia's Federal Court overturning the approval of the Carmichael coal mine – a A$16...

Hiroshima and Nagasaki: remembering the power of peace

Blog entry by Kumi Naidoo | 6 August, 2015 1 comment

More than most, Japan is a nation whose modern history is tragically linked to the quest to use and tame nuclear power. This nuclear history is not noteworthy for its successes, but for how it reflects humanity's capacity for ...

Japan's nuclear history and the power of peace

Blog entry by Junichi Sato | 6 August, 2015 2 comments

The fight against nuclear is steeped in Greenpeace history. On the 70th anniversary of the Hiroshima bombings we're reminded of the consequences of nuclear energy and the people's movement to campaign for nuclear disarmament to create...

Pacific tuna fishing is out of control

Blog entry by Kumi Naidoo | 4 August, 2015

Out in the Pacific Ocean thousands of fishing vessels are working around the clock to pull tuna out of the sea as fast as they can. A Taiwanese longline fishing vessel, just one of thousands of tuna boats fishing the Pacific...

Why President Obama's Clean Power Plan is an exaggeration

Blog entry by Kyle Ash | 3 August, 2015

Today, President Obama's EPA announced the final version of the Clean Power Plan , a policy designed to limit the level of global warming pollution coming from US power plants. This comes eight years after the Supreme Court ruled...

#MisionVaquita's sea patrol comes to an end

Blog entry by Maïa Booker | 3 August, 2015 1 comment

The findings from the Esperanza's most recent research spell trouble for the vaquita. For the past seven days, activists onboard the Esperanza have been patrolling the Gulf of California waters for illegal fishing nets. In that period,...

On the shiny trail of snails

Blog entry by Christiane Huxdorff and Christine Gebeneter | 3 August, 2015

Everybody knows those little not invited guests in our gardens. Snails and their relatives – slugs. How to get rid of them? Especially with some warm and wet weather periods they show up en masse and feed themselves from the...

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