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George Bush leads the US toward a policy of unilateral, pre-emptive counterproliferation warfighting strategy.

Abolish nuclear weapons

The Cold War may be over, but this does not mean nuclear weapons have disappeared. Far from it: There are over 30,000 nuclear weapons in the world, with more than a thousand of them ready to launch at a moment's notice, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Over 400 reactors in warships and nuclear submarines are still circlingthe globe. Some are rotting away on the bottom of the ocean or in adistant port somewhere in Russia. Accidents such as the Russiansubmarine, the Kursk, tragically sinking in the Barents Sea can happenevery day, anywhere.

Over 2,000 nuclear weapons tests have left a legacy of global andregional contamination. People living near the test sites have sufferedfrom cancers, stillbirths, miscarriages and other health effects -- and are still suffering today. Manyhad to leave their hometown or island as it became too contaminated tolive there.

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The nuclear threat has quite literally scaled down in the last twodecades. While the prospect of an all out exchange of arsenals betweenRussia and the US has receded, the 15 kilotons of destructionthat obliterated Hiroshima could today be accomplished with a lunch-boxsized bomb. George Bush talks openly of developing new "more useable"nuclear weapons. Even more alarmingly, the administration continues toseek approval for a programme geared toward designing more robust, more'usable' nuclear weapons.

The prospects of a nuclear weapon actuallybeing used are perhaps greater today than during the cold war.

Today, the number of countries involved in active weapons programsis increasing. A growing number of countries are lining up to join thenuclear club, increasing the chance that a nuclear catastrophe willhappen somewhere on the planet. 

George Bush's war on Weapons of Mass Descruction had its firstconcrete result when the number of countries in the world with declarednuclear weapons increased to 8 from 7, when North Korea announced thatit had built "enough nuclear weapons to deter a US attack."

Nuclear brinkmanship is inevitable in a climate of nuclearhypocrisy. Only when all countries pursue nuclear disarmament in goodfaith can we begin putting the nuclear genie back in the bottle bybanning the use and manufacture of the nuclear materials at the heart of the bomb.

The only thing that will stop the threat is the voice of the second superpower: world opinion.

The latest updates

 

Following big oil into the darkness

Blog entry by Stefan Kerschbaumer | 7 March, 2016 3 comments

Saturday 3/6/2016, 7:30 a.m. My alarm clock rings, it’s time to get up. The narrow corridors inside the Greenpeace ship Arctic Sunrise are unusually empty. Almost the entire ship crew is up on deck working double time to get the ship...

The murder of Berta Cáceres – a sad day for the environment

Blog entry by Miguel Soto | 4 March, 2016 2 comments

Last week, defender of the environment and human rights, Berta Cáceres publicly denounced the murder of several indigenous leaders and the threats she herself was subjected to daily in Honduras. Today, we woke up to the shocking news...

How does social change happen?

Blog entry by Rex Weyler | 4 March, 2016 13 comments

"We live mythically and integrally" — Marshall McLuhan Changing the world remains a complex challenge, with no infallible formula for success. Nevertheless, we possess the record of those who have tried, from the 3000-year-old...

Cutting Deforestation Out Of Palm Oil

Publication | 3 March, 2016 at 6:00

In recent years, the world’s biggest companies have woken up to the environmental costs associated with palm oil and the other commodities they buy. Nowhere are those costs more evident than in Indonesia, which has lost 31 million hectares of...

Palm oil: who’s still trashing forests?

Blog entry by Annisa Rahmawati | 3 March, 2016 1 comment

How 'clean' is the palm oil used by major brands around the world? Today, we're releasing the results of our investigation into which companies are keeping promises to stop deforestation in Indonesia for palm oil. Take a look now to...

Ice loss, the beauty of the Arctic and the threat of fishing fleets

Blog entry by Mads Flarup Christensen | 2 March, 2016 1 comment

Together we kicked out Shell; seven million people across the world stopped Shell’s expansion into the Arctic in 2015. Later in the year nations came together in Paris and signed a historical agreement for the climate. These events...

One planet, thousands of land-struggles to save it

Blog entry by Luca Miggiano and Stephanie Brancaforte | 2 March, 2016

Indigenous peoples and local communities are at the heart of the fight against climate change and environmental destruction. When a new mine breaks ground, when land is grabbed, or when industrial loggers raze forests, they are the...

This Far, No Further

Publication | 2 March, 2016 at 6:00

Investigations by Greenpeace have shown industrial fishing fleets using destructive bottom trawling are invading previously pristine areas of the Barents Sea in the Norwegian Arctic.

Solar energy can change Greece

Blog entry by Anna-Maria Renner | 1 March, 2016 3 comments

Experiencing a beautiful 22 degrees °C sun in Rhodes, Greece brought to mind two thoughts: 1) “Yes, it is truly the Island of the Sun.” 2) “Yes, climate change is happening.” This led me to one conclusion: Solar power is the...

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