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George Bush leads the US toward a policy of unilateral, pre-emptive counterproliferation warfighting strategy.

Abolish nuclear weapons

The Cold War may be over, but this does not mean nuclear weapons have disappeared. Far from it: There are over 30,000 nuclear weapons in the world, with more than a thousand of them ready to launch at a moment's notice, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Over 400 reactors in warships and nuclear submarines are still circlingthe globe. Some are rotting away on the bottom of the ocean or in adistant port somewhere in Russia. Accidents such as the Russiansubmarine, the Kursk, tragically sinking in the Barents Sea can happenevery day, anywhere.

Over 2,000 nuclear weapons tests have left a legacy of global andregional contamination. People living near the test sites have sufferedfrom cancers, stillbirths, miscarriages and other health effects -- and are still suffering today. Manyhad to leave their hometown or island as it became too contaminated tolive there.

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The nuclear threat has quite literally scaled down in the last twodecades. While the prospect of an all out exchange of arsenals betweenRussia and the US has receded, the 15 kilotons of destructionthat obliterated Hiroshima could today be accomplished with a lunch-boxsized bomb. George Bush talks openly of developing new "more useable"nuclear weapons. Even more alarmingly, the administration continues toseek approval for a programme geared toward designing more robust, more'usable' nuclear weapons.

The prospects of a nuclear weapon actuallybeing used are perhaps greater today than during the cold war.

Today, the number of countries involved in active weapons programsis increasing. A growing number of countries are lining up to join thenuclear club, increasing the chance that a nuclear catastrophe willhappen somewhere on the planet. 

George Bush's war on Weapons of Mass Descruction had its firstconcrete result when the number of countries in the world with declarednuclear weapons increased to 8 from 7, when North Korea announced thatit had built "enough nuclear weapons to deter a US attack."

Nuclear brinkmanship is inevitable in a climate of nuclearhypocrisy. Only when all countries pursue nuclear disarmament in goodfaith can we begin putting the nuclear genie back in the bottle bybanning the use and manufacture of the nuclear materials at the heart of the bomb.

The only thing that will stop the threat is the voice of the second superpower: world opinion.

The latest updates

 

It's time to talk about Belgium’s nuclear problem

Blog entry by Jan Vande Putte | 1 April, 2016

President Obama invited more than fifty heads of state and heads of government to a summit in Washington DC this week to discuss the risks of nuclear terrorism.  While the official agenda is tackling proliferation of nuclear weapons,...

The cattle battle: How one supermarket is stepping up to stop Amazon destruction for beef

Blog entry by Adriana Charoux | 30 March, 2016

Brazil's largest supermarket chain has just committed stop selling beef linked to Amazon destruction and human rights violations – because Brazilians demanded it. Today Grupo Pão de Açúcar – Brazil’s largest supermarket...

First faces of fortress Europe

Feature story | 30 March, 2016 at 15:00

It’s officially spring in the Northern Hemisphere but nobody seems to have told the weather gods in Lesbos. As 50-knot gusts of wind thump the island from the south, at least they bring welcome warm air and time to put some thoughts to paper.

Reflections on MSF, Lesbos and refugees

Blog entry by Stan Vincent, Ries Mentink, and Christine Weiss | 30 March, 2016 1 comment

Greenpeace spent four months assisting Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) carry out its humanitarian and aid work on the Greek island of Lesbos, including the rescue of refugees in distress at sea. As Greenpeace transitioned out of the...

Standing watch in solidarity with refugees

Blog entry by Mariadina Lilis | 29 March, 2016 1 comment

Ι'm sitting on a bench facing the sea, so many thoughts, so many decisions I have to make. Let the wind take them all. It's another day among many I've spent here at the joint Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)-Greenpeace observation...

Stories from Lesbos

Blog entry by Camille Ghislain | 29 March, 2016 1 comment

For a week, a month or even longer, Greenpeace staff and volunteers have been lending their maritime expertise to Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) to help rescue refugees in distress at sea. They come from all...

A big deal for our ocean

Blog entry by Magnus Eckeskog | 28 March, 2016 6 comments

Today governments from all over the world will meet at the United Nations in New York to develop a new treaty to save our oceans. We will be there to ensure clear rules for the creation of sanctuaries that will give our oceans the...

How New Zealand stood up to the fossil fools

Blog entry by Nick Young | 23 March, 2016

Greenpeace New Zealand coordinated one of the largest civil disobedience climate protests in their country’s history... and it was a beautiful thing. More than 200 people descended on New Zealand’s largest oil industry conference...

How coal is deepening the water crisis in India

Blog entry by Subrata Biswas | 22 March, 2016 1 comment

New Greenpeace International  research released today , on World Water Day, finds that coal power plants around the world consume enough freshwater to sustain one billion people. One photographer in India documented the impacts on...

The Great Water Grab

Publication | 22 March, 2016 at 1:15

Water is essential for all life on earth and plays a central role in human development: from sanitation and health, to food and energy production, to industrial activities and economic development.

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