This page has been archived, and may no longer be up to date

George Bush leads the US toward a policy of unilateral, pre-emptive counterproliferation warfighting strategy.

Abolish nuclear weapons

The Cold War may be over, but this does not mean nuclear weapons have disappeared. Far from it: There are over 30,000 nuclear weapons in the world, with more than a thousand of them ready to launch at a moment's notice, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Over 400 reactors in warships and nuclear submarines are still circlingthe globe. Some are rotting away on the bottom of the ocean or in adistant port somewhere in Russia. Accidents such as the Russiansubmarine, the Kursk, tragically sinking in the Barents Sea can happenevery day, anywhere.

Over 2,000 nuclear weapons tests have left a legacy of global andregional contamination. People living near the test sites have sufferedfrom cancers, stillbirths, miscarriages and other health effects -- and are still suffering today. Manyhad to leave their hometown or island as it became too contaminated tolive there.

Helpus improve this website section by taking thisquick survey.

The nuclear threat has quite literally scaled down in the last twodecades. While the prospect of an all out exchange of arsenals betweenRussia and the US has receded, the 15 kilotons of destructionthat obliterated Hiroshima could today be accomplished with a lunch-boxsized bomb. George Bush talks openly of developing new "more useable"nuclear weapons. Even more alarmingly, the administration continues toseek approval for a programme geared toward designing more robust, more'usable' nuclear weapons.

The prospects of a nuclear weapon actuallybeing used are perhaps greater today than during the cold war.

Today, the number of countries involved in active weapons programsis increasing. A growing number of countries are lining up to join thenuclear club, increasing the chance that a nuclear catastrophe willhappen somewhere on the planet. 

George Bush's war on Weapons of Mass Descruction had its firstconcrete result when the number of countries in the world with declarednuclear weapons increased to 8 from 7, when North Korea announced thatit had built "enough nuclear weapons to deter a US attack."

Nuclear brinkmanship is inevitable in a climate of nuclearhypocrisy. Only when all countries pursue nuclear disarmament in goodfaith can we begin putting the nuclear genie back in the bottle bybanning the use and manufacture of the nuclear materials at the heart of the bomb.

The only thing that will stop the threat is the voice of the second superpower: world opinion.

The latest updates

 

Colombia bans coal mining in the páramos!

Blog entry by Silvia Gomez | 12 February, 2016 4 comments

The páramos of Colombia – a region of the Andes too high for trees to grow and too low to be covered in snow – holds an ecosystem unlike any other on earth. One that millions of people rely on. Home to thousands of unique species,...

Climbing Fitz Roy in Patagonia without PFCs

Blog entry by David Bacci | 12 February, 2016

After successfully climbing Cerro Torre, my next goal was to climb the route opened by the legendary Italian climbers Casimiro Ferrari and Vittorio Meles in 1976, called Pilar Este on the Eastern Face of Fitz Roy in Patagonia, on the...

Detoxing at the root of fashion

Blog entry by Chiara Campione | 11 February, 2016

Change is most difficult but also most effective when it happens at the root of a problem. This is why we are now working with Italy’s Prato region to Detox the companies that supply renowned fashion brands, including Gucci, Prada...

Every voice counts… even mine: how Fion Lam took action to detox the outdoors

Blog entry by Fion Lam | 9 February, 2016

One week, 150 actions, 21 countries. Outdoor lovers around the globe have taken to the streets, shops, fields, mountains and woods everywhere to ask The North Face and Mammut to stay true to their values of love and respect for nature...

Cancún’s mangroves destroyed, but hope grows again

Blog entry by Miguel Rivas | 5 February, 2016 6 comments

Just a month ago, if you passed by Tajamar in Cancún, Mexico you would have seen 57 hectares of thriving mangrove forest lining the coast. Today, only stumps remain. Image courtesy of Salvemos Manglar Tajamar. For years,...

From cyanide gold mine to protected historical site. How people power saved Roșia Montană

Blog entry by Madalina Preda | 5 February, 2016 1 comment

For the past 15 years, Canadian mining firm Gabriel Resources has been trying to obtain a permit to extract 300 tonnes of gold from underneath Roșia Montană, a picturesque village in western Romania, with a population of almost 4,000...

Big news for bees

Blog entry by Luís Ferreirim | 5 February, 2016

As ecological farming and the market for organic food continues to grow across the globe, I’m heartened to see that the same is true in Spain, my home country, where we are going through one of the worst economic crises in recent...

Evaluating the Paris Deal

Blog entry by Rex Weyler | 5 February, 2016 5 comments

Hope and failure coexist in the Paris climate agreement. One may want to curse or cheer the deal, but it is history now, and we have to get on with it. The agreement provides an opportunity to assess our ecological progress and prepare...

Refugee turtle

Blog entry by Nikos Charalambides | 5 February, 2016 3 comments

The news passed quietly, but not without significance. I heard that a wounded and weakened loggerhead sea turtle washed ashore on the rocky Farmakonisi Island in the Aegean Sea, where it lay for several days slowly losing its strength.

81 - 90 of 13592 results.