This page has been archived, and may no longer be up to date

George Bush leads the US toward a policy of unilateral, pre-emptive counterproliferation warfighting strategy.

Abolish nuclear weapons

The Cold War may be over, but this does not mean nuclear weapons have disappeared. Far from it: There are over 30,000 nuclear weapons in the world, with more than a thousand of them ready to launch at a moment's notice, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Over 400 reactors in warships and nuclear submarines are still circlingthe globe. Some are rotting away on the bottom of the ocean or in adistant port somewhere in Russia. Accidents such as the Russiansubmarine, the Kursk, tragically sinking in the Barents Sea can happenevery day, anywhere.

Over 2,000 nuclear weapons tests have left a legacy of global andregional contamination. People living near the test sites have sufferedfrom cancers, stillbirths, miscarriages and other health effects -- and are still suffering today. Manyhad to leave their hometown or island as it became too contaminated tolive there.

Helpus improve this website section by taking thisquick survey.

The nuclear threat has quite literally scaled down in the last twodecades. While the prospect of an all out exchange of arsenals betweenRussia and the US has receded, the 15 kilotons of destructionthat obliterated Hiroshima could today be accomplished with a lunch-boxsized bomb. George Bush talks openly of developing new "more useable"nuclear weapons. Even more alarmingly, the administration continues toseek approval for a programme geared toward designing more robust, more'usable' nuclear weapons.

The prospects of a nuclear weapon actuallybeing used are perhaps greater today than during the cold war.

Today, the number of countries involved in active weapons programsis increasing. A growing number of countries are lining up to join thenuclear club, increasing the chance that a nuclear catastrophe willhappen somewhere on the planet. 

George Bush's war on Weapons of Mass Descruction had its firstconcrete result when the number of countries in the world with declarednuclear weapons increased to 8 from 7, when North Korea announced thatit had built "enough nuclear weapons to deter a US attack."

Nuclear brinkmanship is inevitable in a climate of nuclearhypocrisy. Only when all countries pursue nuclear disarmament in goodfaith can we begin putting the nuclear genie back in the bottle bybanning the use and manufacture of the nuclear materials at the heart of the bomb.

The only thing that will stop the threat is the voice of the second superpower: world opinion.

The latest updates

 

Melting sea ice breaks new records — an Arctic sanctuary is more urgent than ever

Blog entry by Sophie Allain | 23 March, 2017

With sea ice at record low levels this winter, the Arctic needs us now perhaps more than ever. Last week, a vote in the European Parliament showed that Arctic protection has become an established conversation in the corridors of...

Why Brazil’s rotten meat scandal is a big problem — and not just for Brazilians

Blog entry by Davin Hutchins | 22 March, 2017 3 comments

Food scandals like this happen more often than you think and may affect you more than you know — even if you don’t live in Brazil. Have you heard about the shocking rotten meat scandal that’s shaking the Brazilian society...

Samsung, the clock is ticking

Blog entry by Robin Perkins | 22 March, 2017

Galaxy Note7 is the most talked about phone release in years — unfortunately for Samsung however, for the wrong reasons. Anyone travelling on a plane since November anywhere in the world will have heard about the overheating issues...

How community land rights can save our forests and climate

Blog entry by Fionuala Cregan | 21 March, 2017

Almost exactly two years ago, the local communities of Mahan forest, in the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh, had plenty of reason to celebrate. On the eve of the International Day of Forests 2015, they received news that their...

When reindeer have nowhere to run

Blog entry by Konstantin Fomin | 17 March, 2017

For hundreds of years the Khanty people of Western Siberia have lived in harmony with nature. But as the oil industry seizes more and more of their land, their animals perish in oil spills and reindeer herders are losing their last...

Mars and Nestlé just stepped up to protect the ocean and workers. Here's how.

Blog entry by John Hocevar | 16 March, 2017 2 comments

Thanks to the hard work of pet owners and activists like you, Mars and Nestlé — the two largest pet food companies in the world — are committing to make immediate changes to help ensure their pet food supply chains are safer for our...

In Brazil, dams threaten rivers, the environment and people's lives

Blog entry by Luana Lila | 14 March, 2017 2 comments

Today is the International Day of Action for Rivers: a time to remember and honour the communities who have been impacted by the construction of dams and the movements trying to prevent disastrous new dam projects. For Brazil, the...

The world is ready to Break Free. Will you join us?

Blog entry by Agustin Maggio | 13 March, 2017

This weekend marked the global kick-off of the Break Free movement calling for a world free from fossil fuels. Break Free is a wave of individuals, communities, local and international organisations taking a firm stance against...

Biological Restoration of water and land

Blog entry by Rex Weyler | 10 March, 2017

According to the 2015 World Economic Forum Global Risks 2015 Report, the water crisis is the world’s #1 risk. The problem is not only the amount of water available in the world’s rivers, lakes, and aquifers, but the pollution of...

They want you to think the Fukushima nuclear disaster is over. But it’s still with us.

Blog entry by Yuko Yoneda | 10 March, 2017

Six years ago, over 15,000 people perished and tens of thousands of people's lives changed forever. Northeastern Japan was hit by a massive earthquake, followed by an enormous tsunami that wiped out coastal towns one after another.

1 - 10 of 13774 results.