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George Bush leads the US toward a policy of unilateral, pre-emptive counterproliferation warfighting strategy.

Abolish nuclear weapons

The Cold War may be over, but this does not mean nuclear weapons have disappeared. Far from it: There are over 30,000 nuclear weapons in the world, with more than a thousand of them ready to launch at a moment's notice, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Over 400 reactors in warships and nuclear submarines are still circlingthe globe. Some are rotting away on the bottom of the ocean or in adistant port somewhere in Russia. Accidents such as the Russiansubmarine, the Kursk, tragically sinking in the Barents Sea can happenevery day, anywhere.

Over 2,000 nuclear weapons tests have left a legacy of global andregional contamination. People living near the test sites have sufferedfrom cancers, stillbirths, miscarriages and other health effects -- and are still suffering today. Manyhad to leave their hometown or island as it became too contaminated tolive there.

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The nuclear threat has quite literally scaled down in the last twodecades. While the prospect of an all out exchange of arsenals betweenRussia and the US has receded, the 15 kilotons of destructionthat obliterated Hiroshima could today be accomplished with a lunch-boxsized bomb. George Bush talks openly of developing new "more useable"nuclear weapons. Even more alarmingly, the administration continues toseek approval for a programme geared toward designing more robust, more'usable' nuclear weapons.

The prospects of a nuclear weapon actuallybeing used are perhaps greater today than during the cold war.

Today, the number of countries involved in active weapons programsis increasing. A growing number of countries are lining up to join thenuclear club, increasing the chance that a nuclear catastrophe willhappen somewhere on the planet. 

George Bush's war on Weapons of Mass Descruction had its firstconcrete result when the number of countries in the world with declarednuclear weapons increased to 8 from 7, when North Korea announced thatit had built "enough nuclear weapons to deter a US attack."

Nuclear brinkmanship is inevitable in a climate of nuclearhypocrisy. Only when all countries pursue nuclear disarmament in goodfaith can we begin putting the nuclear genie back in the bottle bybanning the use and manufacture of the nuclear materials at the heart of the bomb.

The only thing that will stop the threat is the voice of the second superpower: world opinion.

The latest updates

 

Protecting what protects us

Blog entry by Daniel Mittler | 2 December, 2016

The diversity of nature is essential to ensure our planet remains habitable. That is why we need to stand up to all those who endanger the global web of life – those who plunder the Commons for private gain. Back in 1992,...

What will it take to protect the world’s fish and oceans for future generations?

Blog entry by Dr Cat Dorey | 1 December, 2016

I don’t speak tuna . And I fear my ability to sign in shark could be fatally misconstrued. But next week when people from all around the Pacific and beyond meet in Fiji to discuss the future of fisheries in the region, our finned...

Where is the hope?

Blog entry by Rex Weyler | 30 November, 2016

I’m not sure we can win with logic.  How do we reverse species loss, climate change, toxins, general overshoot of Earth’s generous habitats? We have the science, but humanity at the large scale does not appear to have the political...

Four ways our forests must be part of the climate conversation

Blog entry by Jannes Stoppel | 30 November, 2016 1 comment

On a warming planet, forests hold the key to stopping climate change. Forest landscapes and agricultural areas can absorb emissions like a sponge. They take carbon dioxide from the air through photosynthesis, and store it in wood and...

Samsung, can you hear us?

Blog entry by Robin Perkins | 29 November, 2016

Over the past week we've watched as thousands of people around the world joined our urgent call for Samsung to come up with a concrete plan to reuse or recycle 4.3 million Galaxy Note7s. From Hong Kong to Washington DC, you called...

Black Friday: Breathe, take a break – the planet can't handle it anymore

Blog entry by Kirsten Brodde | 24 November, 2016

Black Friday and Cyber Monday are expected to generate billions of dollars in sales for clothing and other products this year. But this shopping bonanza also generates greater volumes of waste than ever. That is bad news for the...

Stand for Indigenous rights – and for the planet

Blog entry by Dawn Bickett | 23 November, 2016 1 comment

For centuries, Indigenous Peoples have been fighting to protect their lands and secure their rights in the face of colonisation, environmental destruction and violence. Today – with looming global environmental crises like climate...

One phone call could #SaveTheGalaxy

Blog entry by Robin Perkins | 21 November, 2016 1 comment

At the beginning of the month we launched a petition to ask Samsung to reuse or recycle materials from 4.3 million Galaxy Note7 phones following its global recall in October. Since then the story has been picked up by ...

The world unites, vulnerable countries inspire – but there’s hard work ahead

Blog entry by Jennifer Morgan | 18 November, 2016 1 comment

I have attended countless UN Climate conferences during the past two decades, but Marrakech will be among the more memorable, and not just because there was a sense of renewed determination here in the face of the election of Donald...

We will win – despite Trump

Blog entry by Jennifer Morgan | 16 November, 2016 5 comments

I am hopeful and determined today. The first ever truly global agreement to fight climate change, the Paris Agreement, is having its first ever formal meeting. I have been working towards this moment for decades. This is no normal...

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