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George Bush leads the US toward a policy of unilateral, pre-emptive counterproliferation warfighting strategy.

Abolish nuclear weapons

The Cold War may be over, but this does not mean nuclear weapons have disappeared. Far from it: There are over 30,000 nuclear weapons in the world, with more than a thousand of them ready to launch at a moment's notice, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Over 400 reactors in warships and nuclear submarines are still circlingthe globe. Some are rotting away on the bottom of the ocean or in adistant port somewhere in Russia. Accidents such as the Russiansubmarine, the Kursk, tragically sinking in the Barents Sea can happenevery day, anywhere.

Over 2,000 nuclear weapons tests have left a legacy of global andregional contamination. People living near the test sites have sufferedfrom cancers, stillbirths, miscarriages and other health effects -- and are still suffering today. Manyhad to leave their hometown or island as it became too contaminated tolive there.

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The nuclear threat has quite literally scaled down in the last twodecades. While the prospect of an all out exchange of arsenals betweenRussia and the US has receded, the 15 kilotons of destructionthat obliterated Hiroshima could today be accomplished with a lunch-boxsized bomb. George Bush talks openly of developing new "more useable"nuclear weapons. Even more alarmingly, the administration continues toseek approval for a programme geared toward designing more robust, more'usable' nuclear weapons.

The prospects of a nuclear weapon actuallybeing used are perhaps greater today than during the cold war.

Today, the number of countries involved in active weapons programsis increasing. A growing number of countries are lining up to join thenuclear club, increasing the chance that a nuclear catastrophe willhappen somewhere on the planet. 

George Bush's war on Weapons of Mass Descruction had its firstconcrete result when the number of countries in the world with declarednuclear weapons increased to 8 from 7, when North Korea announced thatit had built "enough nuclear weapons to deter a US attack."

Nuclear brinkmanship is inevitable in a climate of nuclearhypocrisy. Only when all countries pursue nuclear disarmament in goodfaith can we begin putting the nuclear genie back in the bottle bybanning the use and manufacture of the nuclear materials at the heart of the bomb.

The only thing that will stop the threat is the voice of the second superpower: world opinion.

The latest updates

 

Life of a 5-star activist

Blog entry by Veena Krishnamurthy | 22 May, 2015 14 comments

I wonder how '5-star activists' are defined, but I guess I am one of them. And here is a glimpse of my activist life, and some riches I gathered along the way. In the forests of Sathyamangalam three decades ago, fellow activists...

How our breakfast choice can change the food system

Blog entry by Reyes Tirado | 18 May, 2015 2 comments

8:00 am, Monday, southern Spain: "What's for breakfast, Mom?" Everyday, at least three times a day, we are faced with the same question: What to eat? For almost 1 billion people in the world this is a painful question, with an...

Marine Stewardship Council: Living in fisheries fantasy land

Blog entry by Dr. Cat Dorey | 14 May, 2015 2 comments

Imagine if you're sick or injured and your doctor gives you the 'all clear' while still developing your treatment plan. You'd get a new doctor, right? Well, the latest tuna fishery recommended for Marine Stewardship Council (MSC)...

Mad Max is here

Feature story | 14 May, 2015 at 11:00

We went on an expedition to see up close — and from above, with unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs or drones) — the real situation of the main reservoirs of the south-eastern Brazil. What we saw shows that the worst of the water crisis is yet to come.

Low impact fishermen, alive and kicking!

Blog entry by Elvira Jimenez | 12 May, 2015 1 comment

Last week I had the pleasure of re visiting Dénia, a small vibrant town in the Mediterranean coast of Spain. When the Greenpeace ship Arctic Sunrise toured Europe in support of low impact fishers in 2013 , Dénia was one of many stops...

Those who produce our food suffer the most

Blog entry by Kirsten Thompson | 12 May, 2015 2 comments

How pesticides affect farmers' and our health. At Greenpeace we have been campaigning against the use of chemical pesticides in agriculture for a long time. Not only because they are not necessary for food production, in fact...

When industrial food fails us, it's time to change the food system

Blog entry by Alessandro Saccoccio | 11 May, 2015 5 comments

The current food system is broken. We all see how industrial and chemical intensive food production impacts on people and farmers, the planet and animals. For example, did you know that in 2007, 269 tonnes of pesticides were used...

Greenpeace India: The price of dissent

Blog entry by Ashish Fernandes | 6 May, 2015 10 comments

In less than a month, Greenpeace India is in danger of closing. Over the last year, we have born the brunt of repeated attacks. In June 2014, all funds coming from Greenpeace's international office were frozen. Then in January, my...

A simple gesture to help protect the Arctic

Blog entry by Virginia Rabal | 2 May, 2015 1 comment

OK so this week we've been talking about the OSPAR Convention , and the delegates who have the power to secure a Marine Protected Area in 10% of the future Arctic Sanctuary. All this is very interesting, but what can I do to let OSPAR...

The Rainbow Warrior heads to Vanuatu

Blog entry by Matisse Walkden-Brown | 30 April, 2015 2 comments

Since Cyclone Pam devastated Vanuatu and the Pacific in March, 75,000 people have been left in dire need of emergency shelter and other goods to restore their lives and homes. There are ongoing tireless efforts from many different...

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