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George Bush leads the US toward a policy of unilateral, pre-emptive counterproliferation warfighting strategy.

Abolish nuclear weapons

The Cold War may be over, but this does not mean nuclear weapons have disappeared. Far from it: There are over 30,000 nuclear weapons in the world, with more than a thousand of them ready to launch at a moment's notice, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Over 400 reactors in warships and nuclear submarines are still circlingthe globe. Some are rotting away on the bottom of the ocean or in adistant port somewhere in Russia. Accidents such as the Russiansubmarine, the Kursk, tragically sinking in the Barents Sea can happenevery day, anywhere.

Over 2,000 nuclear weapons tests have left a legacy of global andregional contamination. People living near the test sites have sufferedfrom cancers, stillbirths, miscarriages and other health effects -- and are still suffering today. Manyhad to leave their hometown or island as it became too contaminated tolive there.

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The nuclear threat has quite literally scaled down in the last twodecades. While the prospect of an all out exchange of arsenals betweenRussia and the US has receded, the 15 kilotons of destructionthat obliterated Hiroshima could today be accomplished with a lunch-boxsized bomb. George Bush talks openly of developing new "more useable"nuclear weapons. Even more alarmingly, the administration continues toseek approval for a programme geared toward designing more robust, more'usable' nuclear weapons.

The prospects of a nuclear weapon actuallybeing used are perhaps greater today than during the cold war.

Today, the number of countries involved in active weapons programsis increasing. A growing number of countries are lining up to join thenuclear club, increasing the chance that a nuclear catastrophe willhappen somewhere on the planet. 

George Bush's war on Weapons of Mass Descruction had its firstconcrete result when the number of countries in the world with declarednuclear weapons increased to 8 from 7, when North Korea announced thatit had built "enough nuclear weapons to deter a US attack."

Nuclear brinkmanship is inevitable in a climate of nuclearhypocrisy. Only when all countries pursue nuclear disarmament in goodfaith can we begin putting the nuclear genie back in the bottle bybanning the use and manufacture of the nuclear materials at the heart of the bomb.

The only thing that will stop the threat is the voice of the second superpower: world opinion.

The latest updates

 

PFC Pollution Hotspots

Publication | 14 November, 2016 at 14:00

The manufacture of hazardous per- and polyfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) is leading to contamination of the local environment, including surface water, drinking water, groundwater as well as air and dust.

A Deadly Trade-off

Publication | 27 September, 2016 at 6:00

Over the last two decades, the plantation sector has laid waste to Indonesia’s forests and peatlands. Millions of hectares have been destroyed for pulp and oil palm concessions at great cost to wildlife, the climate and people.

Hidden in Plain Sight

Publication | 13 July, 2016 at 9:00

A recent investigation by Greenpeace has found hazardous poly-fluorinated chemicals (PFCs) in the indoor air of stores selling outdoor gear in Europe and East Asia. Samples were taken in the flagship stores of the brands Mammut, The North Face,...

Burning Issue

Publication | 9 June, 2016 at 0:00

The Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) suspended Malaysian palm oil company IOI in March 2016 for breaches of RSPO principles. Since its suspension, IOI has lost many of its biggest customers. It responded with a lawsuit against the RSPO,...

Made in Taiwan

Publication | 14 April, 2016 at 2:30

Illegality and criminal wrongdoing in Taiwanese fisheries are increasingly well documented. Yet too often these very serious problems are reported and dealt with by Taiwanese authorities as if they were isolated incidents - the responsibility of...

Damning the Amazon

Publication | 13 April, 2016 at 8:00

Brazil’s Amazon region, which includes most of the world’s largest remaining area of rainforest, is under attack by uncontrolled economic exploitation. Mainly as a result of industrial agriculture, cattle ranching, mines and infrastructure...

The Great Water Grab

Publication | 22 March, 2016 at 1:15

Water is essential for all life on earth and plays a central role in human development: from sanitation and health, to food and energy production, to industrial activities and economic development.

Nuclear Scars

Publication | 9 March, 2016 at 7:00

It is 30 years since the beginning of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. It is also five years since the Fukushima disaster began. To mark these anniversaries, Greenpeace has commissioned substantial reviews of scientific studies examining the...

Cutting Deforestation Out Of Palm Oil

Publication | 3 March, 2016 at 6:00

In recent years, the world’s biggest companies have woken up to the environmental costs associated with palm oil and the other commodities they buy. Nowhere are those costs more evident than in Indonesia, which has lost 31 million hectares of...

This Far, No Further

Publication | 2 March, 2016 at 6:00

Investigations by Greenpeace have shown industrial fishing fleets using destructive bottom trawling are invading previously pristine areas of the Barents Sea in the Norwegian Arctic.

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