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A frightened villager brings the lid of a barrel that contained uranium oxide (yellowcake) taken from the Tuwaitha nuclear facility, that was left unsecured by occupying forces after the fall of Saddam Hussein. The family used this radioactive barrel to store water and are complaining of rashes and skin problems.

Say no to war

Greenpeace is opposed to war, and we don't believe war is the answer to ridding the world of Weapons of Mass Destruction. That's one of the reasons why we took particular issue with the war on Iraq. We joined with people all over the world in months of global action to promote a non-violent solution to the conflict in Iraq.

We believedthe war was more about oil than about effectively dealing with weaponsof mass destruction. It would result in devastating human andenvironmental consequences, and set a dangerous (not to mentionillegal)precedent.

Though the occupyingforces were quick to secure Iraqi oil fields, they neglected tosafeguard dangerous nuclear material. Now that material has made itsway to homes and schools. Weapons of mass destruction, the alleged reason for the war in the first place, were never found.

Uranium and other nuclear material stored under UN control in Iraquntil the fall of Saddam Hussein have been stolen and local residentsare reportedly displaying symptoms of radiation poisoning. Six weeksafter the occupying forces took control of the country, the US finallyconceded that the UN nuclear watchdog, the International Atomic EnergyAgency (IAEA), could return to assess what has been stolen at part ofone site, Tuwaitha. Yet the IAEA has been refused access to the nearbypopulation or to other sites it wants to visit, in contravention of UNresolutions.

We went to Iraq in June 2003 with a small, specialist teamto examine the local environment and to assess the extent of anynuclear contamination. The team took samples of soil and water forlaboratory analysis and conducted on-site monitoring with specialistradiation detection equipment. While the extent of the Greenpeaceradiological survey will not be comprehensive, it will provide someidea of the true level of risk to the people of the area and to theenvironment.

We are calling for a full assessment of the situation at Tuwaitha and other nuclear sites in Iraq:

  • Theoccupying powers must allow the IAEA to remain in Iraq with anunrestricted mandate to test as well as document all nuclear sites.
  • Theoccupying powers must allow the IAEA to oversee an urgent medical andenvironmental assessment of the impact of the radioactive material thathas spread in the local community - a practice that would be standardin any other country and circumstance.
  • A hunt for all the industrial radioactive isotopes in Iraq must be conducted urgently - these are all potential dirty bombs.

The latest updates

 

Photo essay: Tamura, Japan the terrible dilemma for residents

Blog entry by Brian Blomme | October 10, 2013 3 comments

The residents of the Tamura City region of Fukushima Prefecture in Japan are facing a dilemma. They could move back once the government lifts the evacuation order following the Fukushima nuclear disaster. However, this means moving...

Fukushima’s hidden impacts

Blog entry by Dr. Rianne Teule | October 10, 2013 3 comments

I’m back in the radioactively contaminated areas around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, for the 4 th time since the nuclear disaster in March 2011. Once again it’s surreal. I’ve measured radiation levels that are...

The man who showed us all the true threat in the Arctic

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A photo is key when it comes to bearing witness and Greenpeace has been a leading organization in visuals for over forty years. We go to the frontline of environmental issues to see for ourselves what is happening so that we can show...

Apple wins U.S. EPA award for helping to lead the clean energy revolution in North...

Blog entry by David Pomerantz | September 25, 2013

Apple won a Green Power Leadership award today from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for its use of renewable energy to power its business, especially its data center in North Carolina, the building where Apple stores your...

The Nuclear Sisyphus needs to stop pushing his boulder

Blog entry by Justin McKeating | September 25, 2013 15 comments

Greek myth tells of the proud and arrogant king Sisyphus who, after trying to cheat death, was forced by the Gods to roll a giant boulder up a hill. When he reached the top of the hill, the boulder would roll back to the bottom and...

Japan is nuclear-free once more

Blog entry by Justin McKeating | September 15, 2013 7 comments

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Proof that the nuclear industry has been dodging its responsibilities for over 50 years

Blog entry by Justin McKeating | September 10, 2013 11 comments

Information released today by Greenpeace Japan shows that the builders and suppliers of nuclear reactors were afraid of being held financially responsible for any accidents they might cause from the outset of the nuclear energy era in...

You can’t build a nuclear power plant without transparency

Blog entry by Jan Haverkamp | September 5, 2013 14 comments

The Slovak Supreme Court in Bratislava fully agreed with Greenpeace last month after we complained that the construction of two reactors at the Mochovce nuclear plant should not be done without proper public participation and...

Choices, voices and being heard

Blog entry by Arin de Hoog | August 22, 2013 1 comment

Every day we have to make choices. For many, the choice is whether or not to do something to protect our environment. For a few of us, there is no choice at all. We do what we have to do to tell the world that there are wrongs that...

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