I Know Who Grew It

Why our food and farming system is broken

Food is life. Food is happiness. Food is love. Our relationship with it is universal, primal, historic, rich in tradition and pride. But right now, most of us do not know where our food comes from. A greedy elite are industrialising, commodifying and controlling every aspect of our food system -- from genome to grocery store. They are growing our food on huge monoculture farms, spraying genetically modified crops with obscene amounts of chemicals and feeding these crops to factory-farmed animals.

Organic Farmer in Cambodia. 9 Oct, 2014 © Peter Caton / Greenpeace

The result is a broken system: soils drained of nutrients, poisoned waterways and the destruction of a precious diversity of crop varieties that have enabled human societies to thrive from the mountains to the coast for millennia. At the other end of the food chain, urban consumers – especially the poor – have little choice but to buy pre-packaged food built devoid of nutrition.

Did you know:

  • 6 Big Ag giants control nearly 70 percent of the world's seed market, much of which has been genetically-modified so they can reap profits on every seed they sell

  • 4 global corporations control 75% of all global grain trade

  • Top 10 global food processing companies control 26% of the global food markets

  • Animal livestock (beef, chicken, etc.) -- mostly grown on industrial factory farms -- is responsible for 18 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions, more than the combined exhaust of all motor vehicles worldwide?

It’s time to transform our broken food system

But a growing food movement is starting to brew around the world. More people are demanding to know where their food is coming from. Farmers and communities are reclaiming control over the seeds of life, and their right to self-determination through the food they grow and eat. A number of far-sighted corporations are looking to meet the evolving demands of the consumers they serve with a food system that matches this growing shift in consciousness.

Greenpeace’s food campaign is here to support the global food movement based on "ecological farming" -- where most of our food is grown ecologically, and farmers together with consumers reject toxic pesticides, chemical fertilizers and GMO seeds. It’s a future where people from all walks of life work together to build a system that is best for their families, farmers, and for the planet.

But we need all of us to act if we’re going to make a dent. Help jumpstart an eco-food revolution by sharing this page. Then click to see What We Can All Do now.

The latest updates


Twenty Years of Failure

Publication | 5 November, 2015 at 8:00

Twenty years ago, the first genetically modified (GM) crops were planted in the USA, alongside dazzling promises about this new technology. Two decades on, the promises are getting bigger and bigger, but GM crops are not delivering any of them.

Europe's Pesticide Addiction

Publication | 13 October, 2015 at 8:00

Europe's dependency on chemical pesticides is nothing short of an addiction. Crops are routinely doused with a variety of chemicals, usually applied multiple times to single crops throughout the whole growing season. Industrial agriculture, with...

Food and Farming Vision

Publication | 18 May, 2015 at 9:00

We are living with a broken food system. It needs to be replaced urgently for the benefit of all people, and the planet. Greenpeace's Food and Farming Vision describes what Ecological Farming means, and how it can be summarised in seven...

Pesticides and our Health

Publication | 12 May, 2015 at 9:00

Since 1950 the human population has doubled, yet the area of arable land used to feed these people has increased by only 10%. There are huge pressures to provide food, at low cost, on land that is becoming more and more degraded as nutrients are...

Smart Breeding

Publication | 28 October, 2014 at 0:00

GE crops are very limited in sophistication, being almost completely dominated by herbicide tolerance and insect resistance traits. Could the numerous tools of biotechnology deliver better outcomes? This report tries to answer that question.

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