Celebrate Food Diversity

Solution: an eco-farming revolution

Food is taste and nourishment. Food is family and culture. Food is science, identity and religion. Food is connection. But do we know where our food comes from, how it is grown and by whom? The answer is a revolution in ecological farming. Unlike our current broken industrial ag model, eco-farming answers these questions as it is a food system, with people and farmers at its heart.

Eco-farming combines modern science and innovation with respect for nature and biodiversity. It ensures healthy farming and healthy food. It protects the soil, the water and the climate. It does not contaminate the environment with chemical inputs or use genetically engineered crops. And it places people and farmers – consumers and producers, rather than the corporations who control our food now – at its very heart.

It is a vision of sustainability and food sovereignty in which food is grown with health and safety first and where control over food and farming rests with local communities, rather than transnational corporations.

Ecological Farm in Brazil. 5 Dec, 2014 © Peter Caton / Greenpeace

Seven basic principles about eco-farming you should know

  • Food sovereignty – Producers and consumers, not corporations, should control the food chain and determine how food is produced.

  • Rewarding rural livelihoods – Eco-agriculture is instrumental in rural development, food security and fighting poverty.

  • Smarter food production and yields – Eco-agriculture can create higher yields to help feed the world.

  • Biodiversity – Promoting diversity in crops, instead of monocultures like corn and soy, is essential to protecting nature.

  • Sustainable soil – Soil fertility can improve using eco-farming methods and refraining from chemical fertilizers and inputs.

  • Ecological pest protection – Farmers can control pest damage and weeds effectively through natural means instead of chemical pesticides.

  • Food Resilience – Diverse and resilient agriculture, not monoculture crops, is the best way to protect communities from shocks from climate and food prices.

Jump-start an eco-food revolution by sharing this page. Then click to see What You Can Do now.

The latest updates


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"In the last four years, the chemical industry has spent $11.2 million on a PR initiative to say it's not their fault, so we know whose fault it is." ― Jon Cooksey, writer, director: How to Boil a Frog . We know what is killing...

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Blog entry by Janet Cotter | 31 May, 2013 1 comment

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Blog entry by Iza Kruszewska | 14 May, 2013

Agribusiness and commodity traders are thin on the ground at this week’s FAO conference in Rome on Forests for Food Security and Nutrition. Despite its title, this event is of little interest to Big Food. After all, this conference is...

EU bans three bee-killer pesticides: a light of hope for bees and agriculture

Blog entry by Matthias Wüthrich | 3 May, 2013 4 comments

The next time you see a bee buzzing around, it’s worthwhile remembering that much of the food we eat depends significantly on pollination these insects provide. But bees and other pollinators are declining globally, particularly in...

Bees in decline: how long will Syngenta deny science?

Blog entry by Marianne Kuenzle | 23 April, 2013 1 comment

Today, six days before the key EU vote to ban bee-killer pesticides, Greenpeace is attending the annual general meeting (AGM) of Syngenta in Basel, Switzerland, in order to alert shareholders to the company’s role in the global decline...

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