Iconic buildings of the world submerged in Cancun

Greenpeace submerges icons of world famous structures: Eiffel Tower, Big Ben, Taj Mahal, Statue of Liberty, Angel of Independence, the Christ, Great Pyramid of Giza, Temple of Heaven, and the Sydney Opera House in the sea.

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Iconic buildings of the world submerged in Cancun

UN Climate Conference, November 29 - 10 December 2010 - Cancun, Mexico

At this year's climate summit governments have a choice. They can decide between a safe future or continue with business as usual and allow climate change to continue to threaten many aspects of life as we know it. After the failure in Copenhagen last year, we know the chances of getting out of Cancun with a global deal that encompasses everything we need are very small. What countries can do here in Cancun is decide on some critical issues that will pave the way for an Energy [R]evolution.

Right now, a clean and safe future is a choice we can still make. An international climate change agreement would catalyze and help pay for a world with clean, secure and independent means of energy guaranteed for generations to come. It could keep forests standing and forest peoples thriving, as well as protecting many species and helping to stop catastrophic climate change.

It would also mean that governments are saying no to coal, going beyond oil and supporting an Energy [R]evolution.

If they can do these things in Cancun, we can start to believe that governments have woken up to the stark choice facing the planet and are stepping out on the right path. Cancun must be where it starts.

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