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Barb wire separates the outside world from government negotiators at the Johannesburg Earth Summit.

Governments

There is a fundamental irony and injustice at the heart of the climate change problem. Today's growing body of evidence indicates very clearly that the first and worst impacts of climate change are felt by the poor in the developing world. The responsibility for the problem, however, lies primarily with the rich industrialised nations, and increasingly the rapidly industrialising nations.

Since all countries are potentially affected by and contribute toclimate change, they should all be involved in the solution. Countieswithout a mature and entrenched energy structure stand to gain by"leapfrogging" to modern energy sources like solar and wind. However,for both practical and moral reasons, it is the industrialised worldthat must take the initiative:

  • Industrialised nations are responsible for the bulk of greenhouse gas emissions - both today and historically. In the past, economic progress was linked directly to carbon dioxide emissions (via the burning of oil, coal and gas to generate energy). Renewable energy sources change this, but only a small number of nations have begun to implement them in earnest.
  • Two billion people - one third of the world's population - have no access to electricity for basic needs such as lighting or cooking. Getting people the clean and reliable energy necessary for essential needs such as clean water, health care facilities, heating and lighting is one of the most pressing problems facing humanity today.
  • Industrialised nations have the capital, resources and expertise to jump-start their renewable energy industries. Obviously, countries with advanced space programs, established higher educational systems and abundant cash for investment are better positioned to implement these new energy technologies then countries still struggling with basic energy needs.

Perhaps part of the problem, though, isthat industrialised nations are also better positioned to adapt toclimate change. Their populations can migrate more easily, newconstruction (of sea walls, etc.) is more feasible and their financialstructures are more stable (including availability of insurance). Oneneeds only think about the different level of response to a naturaldisaster, such as a hurricane, in a rich industrialised nation comparedto a less wealthy developing one to realise how climate change willlikely impact people around the world disproportionately.

However,the industrialised nations must also realize that there will be a point(perhaps already reached) beyond which adaptation alone is no longerthe cost effective choice, and beyond that a point where simplyadapting to climate change is no longer possible.

Fundamentally, we have one Earth, and only one global climate.

More information:

Climate Analysis Indicators Tool by World Resources Institute

Climate Justice

The latest updates

 

Month in Pictures - November 2011

Slideshow | 29 November, 2011

Top Spot for HP in New Guide to Greener Electronics

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We just released a new version of the Guide to Greener Electronics , which this time ranks 15 gadget and electronics companies on energy, greener products and sustainable operations. HP takes the lead at 5.9 out of a possible 10...

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Publication | 1 November, 2011 at 11:35

At Rio de Janeiro in 2012 governments must change the dangerous course we’re on. Sustainable Development Goals should be launched to form the basis of development within planetary boundaries.

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My favourite article on our recent 40th anniversary was about the serious, important but often invisible political work we do. So while Brian has already told you that our new flagship Rainbow Warrior III will be heading to Rio...

2011 Green Game Changers

Blog entry by Kumi Naidoo | 30 September, 2011 1 comment

The Huffington Post has been kind enough to include me in their list of game changers for 2011. It really is an honour to see myself in the company of such amazing and inspiring people – all of whom are doing fantastic work. ...

Moving the Planet actions from Canada to Nepal

Blog entry by Eoin Dubsky | 26 September, 2011 4 comments

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Image | 15 August, 2011 at 12:43

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Tim DeChristopher, A New Hero

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The environment and the world have a new hero, a reluctant hero perhaps, but someone who in good conscience could not stand by and watch a grave injustice take place without trying to prevent it. Without taking a stand at a risk to...

Jedi, we need your help. There has been a disturbance in the Force.

Blog entry by JamesS - Greenpeace UK | 1 July, 2011 18 comments

Last night – at approximately 18:30 – our communications equipment took a direct hit . After providing nearly 2 million transmissions of our latest Rebellion underground message “VW: The Dark Side”, our YouTube films and channel were...

Dr. Willie Soon: a Career Fueled by Koch, Big Oil and Coal

Blog entry by Kert Davies | 29 June, 2011 2 comments

When US climate denier and astrophysicist Dr Willie Soon wrote a controversial paper in 2003 that attempted to challenge the historical temperature records, we all raised eyebrows at revelations that the American Petroleum Institute...

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