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Greenpeace activists climb a 700-ft coal plant smokestack to denounce Bush's dirty power plan. The Hatfield's Ferry Power Station is a symbol and an example of the Bush administration's dirty energy policy that favors polluting fossil fuels over clean energy sources.

United States

The saying, "If you not part of the solution, you're part of the problem", is a massive understatement when it comes to the Bush administration and climate change. With less than 5 percent of the world's population, the US is the world's largest producer of greenhouse gases and is responsible for nearly 25 percent of global carbon dioxide emissions.

And yet, the Bush administration has withdrawn from the onlyinternationally binding measure to tackle climate change - the KyotoProtocol.  Instead, the policy of the Bush administration, and itslegislative allies, is business as usual but only more so. They aregiving millions of dollars in subsidies to the oil, gas and coalindustries; making no credible effort to support renewable energy; andare opening the Arctic National Wildlife refuge for drilling. On theinternational scene, the Bush administration has made extraordinaryefforts to impede progress in tackling climate change. Again and again,at international meetings Greenpeace delegates have watched the Bushteam try to obstruct and weaken international efforts to reduce globalemissions, just as it has tried to wreck so many other internationalnegotiations over the past 15 years.

Not living up to its promise

Ironically,the US could easily be a world leader in addressing climatechange.  Along with energy efficiency, the US has made significantcontributions to wind and solar technology development, and despitelack of support from the Bush administration both industries showstrong domestic growth.  US scientists have also played animportant role in climate change research.  For example, in whatis being called the "smoking gun" of global warming, a decade long NASAled research project has confirmed that our planet is absorbing moreenergy from the sun than is emitted back into space - indicating an"energy imbalance" and a warming world.

Taking a leadership role in climate change would also benefit the US in many ways.  For example:

  • More skilled jobs - Renewable energy creates more jobs per kilowatt than fossil fuels or nuclear.
  • Smaller US trade deficit - Solar and wind power hardware will likely find lucrative export markets.
  • Greater energy security - Less reliance on foreign oil.
  • Foster international good will - By joining the rest of the world in tackling climate change.

Instead,the Bush administration continues to ignore its own scientists, and actas if climate change isn't happening.  Bush's energy policieswould seem divorced from reality if it weren't for the cold hard cashBush and his political allies get from the fossil fuel and nuclearindustries as campaign contributions.  It seems these politicalcontributions, and Bush's own past with the oil industry, handilyoutweigh scientific evidence and world opinion when it comes to hisadministration's energy policy.  

Greenpeace will continueto pressure the US government to take action on climate change. It is also working to persuade US states, cities, the businesscommunity and individuals not to wait for the government, but to moveahead on their own by implementing energy efficiency technologies andbuying renewable energy.  See the Greenpeace USA actions page for how you can help.


More information:

US withdraws from Kyoto Protocol

Stage is set to drill in Arctic refuge

Bush energy scams

Energy scams continued...

Greenpeace USA

Big oil protects its interests - Center for Public Integrity

US Government 'out on a limb over climate change science' - Royal Society news

Who's to blame ten years after Rio? (pdf)

The latest updates

 

From typhoon hit Philippines, a call for climate justice

Blog entry by Aaron Gray-Block | 11 December, 2014

Smashed houses, fallen trees and streets littered with debris greeted us when Greenpeace arrived in Dolores, Eastern Samar, on Tuesday after Typhoon Hagupit made a direct hit on the seaside town. Much of the region's crops had been...

Nature does not negotiate: climate catastrophe is with us now!

Blog entry by Kumi Naidoo | 7 December, 2014 25 comments

As Typhoon Hagupit hits the Philippines, one of the biggest peacetime evacuations in history has been launched to prevent a repeat of the massive loss of life which devastated communities when Super Typhoon Haiyan hit the same area...

The power of the energy transition is spreading fast

Blog entry by Matjaž Dovečar | 5 December, 2014

Greenpeace brought mayors from all over Europe to Bavaria to show them the best practices of German energy transition. First impressions: the 'Energiewende' is contagious! We travelled with eight  mayors from Hungary, Turkey,...

A rainbow from Machu Picchu to Düsseldorf

Blog entry by Sven Teske | 1 December, 2014 1 comment

Peru! What comes to mind when you think of Peru? Right! The mysterious Inca ruins of Machu Picchu, which attract and inspire so many people from around the world, and still have scientists puzzling over their origin. Last night,...

Government spying undermines climate action

Blog entry by Andrew Kerr | 27 November, 2014 1 comment

Unless you’ve been living in a hole in the ground or in a galaxy far, far away you won’t have missed media revelations about government security services snooping on our every communication. Personal phone calls and e-mails are...

Social PreCOP – More than just a document at stake

Blog entry by Mauro Fernandez | 13 November, 2014

The Social PreCOP held in Venezuela left civil society, governments and the delegation of the hosting country with mixed feelings. Can I accept the outcome as is? The answer is 'no'. After a long fight to establish an official...

Historic US-China deal marks the beginning of the end of China’s coal chapter

Blog entry by Li Shuo | 12 November, 2014 4 comments

Today could be the most important day so far this century in climate and energy politics. China and United States have come to an historic agreement , negotiated privately over a period of months, that represents China's first...

Sadness turns to joy as Turkish coal project halted

Blog entry by Deniz Bayram | 12 November, 2014 6 comments

The community of the western Turkish village of Yirca has experienced a rollercoaster of sadness and elation in recent days, winning an important court battle against a coal project but losing 6,000 valuable olive trees. Just...

On World Energy Day let's remind the EU that people want ambitious EU 2030 targets

Blog entry by Virag Kaufer | 22 October, 2014 5 comments

Our ship, the Arctic Sunrise is back with a mission. After a year in Russian custody for a peaceful protest against oil drilling in the Arctic, she is now released, repaired and back in the water. Once again she will challenge reckless...

Assaulted for protecting olive trees

Blog entry by Andrew Davies | 21 October, 2014 7 comments

Villagers and activists were assaulted, handcuffed and hospitalized today while protecting olive trees at the site of a proposed coal plant in Turkey. The Kolin Group wants the olive trees cut down to make way for a new coal power...

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