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Greenpeace activists paint two gigantic cracks on the 32 year old nuclear reactor dome at Borssele, Netherlands. The Dutch government wants to keep the plant, one of the world's oldest, open beyond 2013, despite inherent safety and security risks.

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Climate change is a priority issue for us here at Greenpeace.  Disruptions to ecosystems will likely harm everything from minke whales to coral reefs to polar bears. Whole forests will be lost, and hundreds of thousands of species will become extinct. Climate change will bring devastation to people and communities, especially some of the world's poorest.

Certainly, a big part of our job is bringing home to people everywherethe realities of climate change and the struggle against it.  To name names, protest corporations, shame governments - while helping make climate change solutions a reality.

Our expeditions document the impacts of climate change on people and ecosystems. Our professional negotiators, scientists and policy expertsattend world climate conferences and persuade decision makers to take action.  Our volunteers and cyberactivists keep up the pressure on lawmakers and corporations.  Our activists put their safety and freedom on the line for even the smallest chance to change the world.

Luckily enough, Greenpeace is itself only part of a much larger movement towards positive energy policy.  We are fortunate to work with and beside many other environmental organisations, as well as many companies, governments and individuals who share our dedication, optimism and belief that there is a solution for every problem.

If you would like to be a part of this global movement, and like how wework, please choose to volunteer, sign up as a cyberactivst, and/orsupport us financially. For more ways to help see the Take Action page.

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Bob Hunter on Phyllis Cormack together with

Image | July 9, 1971 at 0:00

Bob Hunter on Phyllis Cormack together with Ben Metcalfe. en route to Amchitka to oppose US nuclear weapons testing.

Imja Glacier in the Himalayan Khumbu Range of Eastern Nepal

Image | April 1, 1961 at 1:00

The Imja Glacier in the Himalayan Khumbu Range of Eastern Nepal, southeast of Mount Everest. This glacier is retreating at nearly 10 metres per year.

The original viewpoint taken at the HPS31

Image | April 1, 1954 at 0:00

The original viewpoint taken at the HPS31 glacier fifty years ago.

"Frozen Tears" glacier has retreated 1500 metres since 1860

Image | April 1, 1939 at 1:00

The Maori call New Zealand's Franz Josef glacier Ka Roimato or "Frozen Tears", after a tale of doomed lovers. This very dynamic glacier it has retreated 1500 metres since scientific observations began in 1860.

"Blomstrandbreen" Glacier in Svalbard, 1922

Image | April 1, 1922 at 1:00

View of the "Blomstrandbreen" Glacier in Svalbard in 1922

Grinnell Glacier in the USA's Glacier National Park

Image | April 1, 1914 at 1:00

Grinnell Glacier in the USA's Glacier National Park flows into the semi-arid high plains through the St Marys and South Saskatchewan Rivers through Canada Hudson's Bay.

Equatorial glaciers rapidly retreating

Image | April 1, 1906 at 1:00

The Orubare Glacier (or Elena Glacier) covers a face of Uganda's Mount Rwenzori on the border with the Democratic Republic of Congo. In 1906 this glacier was in one solid piece. Equatorial glaciers are rare and this legendary African glacier on...

The Pasterze Glacier in the Austrian Alps

Image | April 1, 1900 at 1:00

The Pasterze Glacier in the Austrian Alps, provides water that flows into the Danube basin, home to 83 million people. United Nations scientists have found that the European Alps lost half of the original ice volume since 1850.

1981 - 1988 of 1988 results.