Protecting forests

With the vast majority of the world's forests already destroyed or degraded, Greenpeace is deeply committed to protecting what is left. Our experience of years working in the biggest forest regions of the world has positioned us well to push for the ambitious targets required to deliver forest protection at the speed and scale needed. Thanks to years of campaigning, governments and some companies have finally caught up to these goals and signed agreements aiming to stop deforestation once and for all.

We know, however, that these goals will only be fulfilled with continuous public pressure on government and business to ensure that immediate and concrete implementation is happening on the ground. That is why -- for the benefit of the world's forests - their peoples, biodiversity, carbon stock and other ecological values - and honoring the rights of Indigenous Peoples and other local communities living in forested landscapes, Greenpeace will work as part of a broader global movement to deliver the following goals:

1. Halt deforestation globally by 2020 (in line with UN Sustainable Development target 15.2)

2. Massively reduce forest degradation globally (prioritizing intact forest landscapes)

3. Restore 500 million hectares of native forests by 2030 (exceeding the CBD Aichi target 15 and the New York Declaration of Forests)

Our actions to protect and restore forests aim to make a decisive contribution to the Paris Climate agreement goal to keep global temperature change below a 1.5°C change, complementing efforts to phase-out fossil fuel emissions by 2050.

Pursuing these ambitious goals will require a fundamental mindset shift: from perceiving forests as a limitless resource to recognizing forests as a precious, finite network of life.

The latest updates

 

Global support for Indigenous community fighting mega-dam in the Amazon reaches one...

Press release | 8 July, 2016 at 19:09

Munduruku Indigenous Territory, Pará state, Brazil, 8 July 2016 – Greenpeace International Executive Director Bunny McDiarmid is in the Amazon today, working with the Munduruku Indigenous People in the fight against a mega-dam on their lands.

Brazil: the most dangerous country for environmental activists in 2015

Blog entry by Márcio Astrini | 27 June, 2016

Last year was the worst year on record for the murder of environmental activists, and m ore killings took place in Brazil than in any other country in the world . Activists across the globe are facing increasing violence...

Protesting at Siemens in defense of the Amazon’s Tapajós River

Blog entry by Jannes Stoppel | 22 June, 2016 1 comment

Greenpeace activists are asking the company not to get involved in the construction of an enormous hydroelectric dam in the heart of the Amazon. Last week, Greenpeace activists gathered at Siemens headquarters in Germany and...

Protecting the Amazon, side by side with the Munduruku

Blog entry by Danicley de Aguiar | 15 June, 2016 5 comments

This morning I woke up in the Sawré Muybu village with a strong sense of anticipation. Today we start a series of collaborations with the Munduruku Indigenous People to defend their ancestral territories and protect the heart of the...

Munduruku and Greenpeace demarcate Indigenous Lands in the heart of the Amazon

Press release | 15 June, 2016 at 0:11

Itaituba, Pára State, Brazil, 15 June 2016 - The Munduruku Indigenous Peoples and Greenpeace Brazil joined forces today in an unofficial, community-led demarcation of their land, deep in the heart of the Brazilian Amazon.

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