Junking the Jungle: How KFC is driving rainforest destruction and tiger extinction

Publication: 23 May 2012

KFC is one of the most prominent fast food brands around the world yet has made no commitments to ensure its purchase of products such as soya, palm oil and paper don’t contribute to rainforest destruction.  Now Greenpeace International research has revealed that KFC is sourcing paper for its packaging products from rainforests. This has been confirmed in China, the UK and Indonesia. Products found to contain rainforest fibre include cups, food boxes, French fries holders, napkins and the famous chicken buckets. Greenpeace research has tracked a number of these products back to Asia Pulp & Paper (APP), a company that continues to rely on rainforest clearance in Indonesia.

By purchasing from APP and by using paper made from rainforests, KFC and its parent company Yum! are driving the destruction of forests in countries like Indonesia.  These forests are a key defence against climate change and are habitat for many protected species including the critically endangered Sumatran tiger.

It’s time for the company to take action to stop deforestation.

Join the revolt today and help change KFC’s secret recipe for destruction.

Download a full PDF version here: Junking the Jungle report

The latest updates

 

Finnish government takes the chainsaw to the last of their forests

Feature story | 20 January, 2003 at 0:00

Some 30 countries throughout eastern and western Europe have no intact ancient forest left. Finland retains only about five percent of the old-growth boreal forests that once covered most of the country, but now even that is under threat, and by...

Aerial view of Rokkasho

Image | 21 November, 2002 at 0:00

Aerial view of Rokkasho-mura reprocessing plant taken from Greenpeace sampling kite.

Environmental deathstar heads for Chile's 'reserve of life'

Feature story | 18 November, 2002 at 0:00

The raw materials will come from Australia, Brazil and Jamaica. The finished product will go to the US and Japan. But the massive environmental damage? Well, that stays right there with the Chilean locals. The proposed Noranda Alumysa aluminium...

CITES: Survival hangs from thread

Feature story | 13 November, 2002 at 0:00

Two dramatic Greenpeace actions today and yesterday stressed the plight of endangered species to delegates who will vote to decide their fate. Decisions being made this week on toothfish, sharks, and elephants and other threatened species at the...

600 children tell CITES to save species

Feature story | 7 November, 2002 at 0:00

Spectacular animals like whales, elephants and jaguars may become little more than mythical creatures to children of the future. But this is an unhappy ending that children of today took action to prevent. More than six hundred of them marched...

Species survival plans crucial at CITES

Feature story | 4 November, 2002 at 0:00

Theories abound for dinosaurs' dramatic exit from the planet millions of years ago. Now another mass extinction is underway on Earth, but this time the cause is amply clear: humans. It's time to stop trading Earth's biodiversity for profits, and...

Illegal export of mahogany continues

Feature story | 28 October, 2002 at 0:00

One year ago we uncovered a stash of illegal mahogany in the Brazilian Amazon worth over US$7 million. The seizure of these logs and continued investigations by the government led to a ban on the logging, transport and export of mahogany. But...

Imazon supports increased control over international trade of mahogany: the species’...

Publication | 15 October, 2002 at 0:00

Mahogany has long been subjected to predatory logging throughout tropical America - including Brazil – that is, harvest rates of natural populations exceed natural replacement rates through growth and regeneration. Appendix II listing would...

Forest Views: a newsletter for customers and investors of Canadian logging companies,...

Publication | 1 October, 2002 at 0:00

In this Issue: Forestry in BC: Business as Usual, Forest Practices Code, Who´s Good, Between the Covers? Wind Generation and Benchmarks.

Illegal logs seized in the Amazon

Feature story | 22 September, 2002 at 0:00

After only three days, the river blockade mounted by local communities in the Amazon has stopped two illegal logging barges carrying over 200 logs. The barges have been impounded and the owner fined almost 200,000 Brazilian Reals - nearly US$ 60,000.

1011 - 1020 of 1301 results.

Categories