Junking the Jungle: How KFC is driving rainforest destruction and tiger extinction

Publication: 23 May 2012

KFC is one of the most prominent fast food brands around the world yet has made no commitments to ensure its purchase of products such as soya, palm oil and paper don’t contribute to rainforest destruction.  Now Greenpeace International research has revealed that KFC is sourcing paper for its packaging products from rainforests. This has been confirmed in China, the UK and Indonesia. Products found to contain rainforest fibre include cups, food boxes, French fries holders, napkins and the famous chicken buckets. Greenpeace research has tracked a number of these products back to Asia Pulp & Paper (APP), a company that continues to rely on rainforest clearance in Indonesia.

By purchasing from APP and by using paper made from rainforests, KFC and its parent company Yum! are driving the destruction of forests in countries like Indonesia.  These forests are a key defence against climate change and are habitat for many protected species including the critically endangered Sumatran tiger.

It’s time for the company to take action to stop deforestation.

Join the revolt today and help change KFC’s secret recipe for destruction.

Download a full PDF version here: Junking the Jungle report

The latest updates

 

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Publication | 1 November, 1999 at 0:00

Re-Source: Market Alternatives to Ancient Forest Destruction is the second in a series of Greenpeace reports aimed at the corporate consumers of forest products to help them end their role in ancient forest destruction.The first report, Buying...

Re-source: market alternatives to ancient forest destruction, part two of three

Publication | 1 November, 1999 at 0:00

Re-Source: Market Alternatives to Ancient Forest Destruction is the second in a series of Greenpeace reports aimed at the corporate consumers of forest products to help them end their role in ancient forest destruction.The first report, Buying...

Re-Source: market alternatives to ancient forest destruction, part one of three

Publication | 1 November, 1999 at 0:00

Re-Source: Market Alternatives to Ancient Forest Destruction is the second in a series of Greenpeace reports aimed at the corporate consumers of forest products to help them end their role in ancient forest destruction.The first report, Buying...

Greenpeace campaigner Paolo Adario standing

Image | 1 May, 1999 at 1:00

Greenpeace campaigner Paolo Adario standing on "Clovis" log raft Tapaua River.

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Image | 1 May, 1999 at 1:00

Greenpeace commisioned boat 'NOE IV' with banner against WTK logging plans in Deni land. Canaca River.

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Image | 1 May, 1999 at 1:00

Rainforest logging in the Cameroon. 1999

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Timber logged by the company Carolina, in Itaquatiara. Amazon, Brazil.

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Image | 1 May, 1999 at 1:00

Logging by the French company Coron in Cameroon.

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Image | 24 April, 1999 at 1:00

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Image | 24 April, 1999 at 1:00

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