Junking the Jungle: How KFC is driving rainforest destruction and tiger extinction

Publication: 23 May 2012

KFC is one of the most prominent fast food brands around the world yet has made no commitments to ensure its purchase of products such as soya, palm oil and paper don’t contribute to rainforest destruction.  Now Greenpeace International research has revealed that KFC is sourcing paper for its packaging products from rainforests. This has been confirmed in China, the UK and Indonesia. Products found to contain rainforest fibre include cups, food boxes, French fries holders, napkins and the famous chicken buckets. Greenpeace research has tracked a number of these products back to Asia Pulp & Paper (APP), a company that continues to rely on rainforest clearance in Indonesia.

By purchasing from APP and by using paper made from rainforests, KFC and its parent company Yum! are driving the destruction of forests in countries like Indonesia.  These forests are a key defence against climate change and are habitat for many protected species including the critically endangered Sumatran tiger.

It’s time for the company to take action to stop deforestation.

Join the revolt today and help change KFC’s secret recipe for destruction.

Download a full PDF version here: Junking the Jungle report

The latest updates

 

APP's Forest Conservation Policy

Publication | 29 October, 2013 at 5:00

In February 2013 Greenpeace suspended active campaigning against Asia Pulp & Paper (APP) following the announcement of APP's Forest Conservation Policy (FCP), which includes an immediate moratorium on all further forest clearance by all of its...

Asia Pulp & Paper: from confrontation to engagement

Blog entry by Bustar Maitar | 29 October, 2013 5 comments

I’m usually concerned about speaking too soon, but it feels to me like the risk of Asia Pulp & Paper (APP) now reneging on its zero deforestation pledge is diminishing with every passing month. Breaking such a highly publicised promise...

Licence to kill

Publication | 22 October, 2013 at 5:00

As few as 400 tigers are thought to remain in the rainforests of Sumatra, which are vanishing at a staggering rate – a quarter of a million hectares every year. Expansion of oil palm and pulpwood plantations was responsible for nearly two-thirds...

Wilmar: making you, me and your mum part of forest destruction

Blog entry by Bustar Maitar | 22 October, 2013 1 comment

For most of the last year our team has been investigating and documenting gross acts of environmental destruction in Indonesia’s last remaining forests.  What these investigations reveal is a story of one massive, faceless company with...

An Impending Storm

Publication | 30 September, 2013 at 14:55

Forests provide ecosystem services that include the regulation of weather and climate at local, regional and even global levels. While it is well known that deforestation emits carbon dioxide that contributes to global climate change, less well...

The man who showed us all the true threat in the Arctic

Blog entry by John Novis, Head of Photography, Greenpeace Int'l | 27 September, 2013 10 comments

A photo is key when it comes to bearing witness and Greenpeace has been a leading organization in visuals for over forty years. We go to the frontline of environmental issues to see for ourselves what is happening so that we can show...

Cameroonians realise what Herakles Farms really plans for their forests

Blog entry by Greg Norman | 12 September, 2013 7 comments

As the rain thunders down, it becomes not just increasingly hard to hear the speakers but also to see them. The lack of light due to the poor electricity supply in this part of South West Cameroon means that as the clouds darken, the...

Revealed: new evidence of illegal logging by Herakles Farms

Blog entry by Irene Wabiwa | 12 September, 2013

Herakles Farms is in trouble again. After months of turmoil for the US-based corporation - including a temporary suspension order from the Cameroonian Government, confirmation that the company failed to obtain the Free, Prior and...

Certifying Destruction

Publication | 3 September, 2013 at 5:00

Oil palm plantations are the largest driver of deforestation in Indonesia.

71 - 80 of 1163 results.

Categories