Tiger Manifesto

Protect Paradise

Time is running out for the as few as 400 Sumatran tigers left in Indonesia’s forests. Forest destruction for dirty palm oil plantations is destroying their home and finding its way into our homes through some of the products we use everyday.

From big brands that make shampoos to washing detergent and chocolate, dirty palm oil is everywhere.

But clean, tiger-friendly palm oil is possible.

Consumers – people like you – are daring to challenge the companies who continue to sell forest destruction to customers around the world. And we are starting to win. The world’s largest trader of palm oil, Wilmar International, as well as big plantation companies and household brands like L’Oreal, Nestle, Unilever and Ferrero are listening to the demand for clean palm oil and have committed to become tiger and forest-friendly.

We need more household brands to accelerate the shift to clean palm and show the government of Indonesia that consumers worldwide care about forest protection.

On our streets and online, we’re tracking these brands down and telling them, their bosses and their suppliers to protect the Sumatran tiger’s only home. We’re spreading the word to get our friends, culture makers and policy makers to join us. Your voice is powerful. We want Sumatran tigers and forests in our future; we want to Protect Paradise. Together, we’ve done this before and we know we can win again.

Join us and help the products we love get a makeover.

The latest updates

 

Cooking the Climate

Video | 4 February, 2009 at 15:57

The soaring global demand for palm oil is accelerating the destruction of the Indonesian rainforests. A tragedy for the forests and the people who depend on them and a disaster for the global climate.

Papua: Indonesia's Last Forest Frontier

Video | 2 October, 2008 at 14:42

Papua is home to Indonesia's last remaining pristine forest. These areas are now under increasing threat from the encroaching palm oil industry.

Palm oil: Cooking the Climate

Feature story | 8 November, 2007 at 0:00

If, as you read this, you're tucking into a KitKat or dipping into a tube of Pringles, you might be interested to know that these products contain palm oil that is linked to the destruction of forests and peatlands in Indonesia. As our new report...

How the palm oil industry is Cooking the Climate - full report

Publication | 8 November, 2007 at 0:00

Every year, 1.8 billion tonnes (Gt) of climate changing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are released by the degradation and burning of Indonesia’s peatlands – 4% of global GHG emissions from less than 0.1% of the land on earth. This report shows...

How the palm oil industry is Cooking the Climate

Publication | 8 November, 2007 at 0:00

Every year, 1.8 billion tonnes (Gt) of climate changing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are released by the degradation and burning of Indonesia’s peatlands – 4% of global GHG emissions from less than 0.1% of the land on earth. This report shows...

Forests and climate up in smoke

Feature story | 10 October, 2007 at 0:00

Never has the threat to the world’s forests been more acute nor the risk of dangerous climate change so imminent. With about one-fifth of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions being caused by forest destruction we are highlighting how Indonesia...

Kayu Lapis Indonesia: the untouchable God of Indonesian ancient forest destruction

Publication | 11 April, 2006 at 10:01

This crime file focusses on logging companies such as Kayu Lapis Indonesia, which operate with total disregard of Indonesia’s logging laws. Companies like this are destroying Indonesia’s ancient forests at an alarming rate.

Tanjung Puting National Park under Seige

Publication | 5 January, 2004 at 0:00

Illegal logging is rampant and out of control in Indonesia. It has permeated virtually every forest including areas that are protected from exploitation. In Central Kalimantan, the once pristine Tanjung Puting National Park is one of many...

Indonesia's Forests in Crisis

Publication | 5 January, 2004 at 0:00

Indonesia is an archipelago of 17,000 islands stretching from the waters off Malaysia to the island of New Guinea. Indonesia's forests are home to 10% of the planet's diversity of plants and animals. Orang-utans, elephants, tigers, rhinoceros,...

Partners in Crime: Malaysian loggers, timber markets and the politics of...

Publication | 2 April, 2002 at 0:00

The Paradise Forests of Papua New Guinea are among the largest and most biologically diverse ancient forests left in the world. The future of these forests, and of the people who depend upon them, is currently at the mercy of an international...

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