Tiger Manifesto

Protect Paradise

Time is running out for the as few as 400 Sumatran tigers left in Indonesia’s forests. Forest destruction for dirty palm oil plantations is destroying their home and finding its way into our homes through some of the products we use everyday.

From big brands that make shampoos to washing detergent and chocolate, dirty palm oil is everywhere.

But clean, tiger-friendly palm oil is possible.

Consumers – people like you – are daring to challenge the companies who continue to sell forest destruction to customers around the world. And we are starting to win. The world’s largest trader of palm oil, Wilmar International, as well as big plantation companies and household brands like L’Oreal, Nestle, Unilever and Ferrero are listening to the demand for clean palm oil and have committed to become tiger and forest-friendly.

We need more household brands to accelerate the shift to clean palm and show the government of Indonesia that consumers worldwide care about forest protection.

On our streets and online, we’re tracking these brands down and telling them, their bosses and their suppliers to protect the Sumatran tiger’s only home. We’re spreading the word to get our friends, culture makers and policy makers to join us. Your voice is powerful. We want Sumatran tigers and forests in our future; we want to Protect Paradise. Together, we’ve done this before and we know we can win again.

Join us and help the products we love get a makeover.

The latest updates

 

You did it! Palm oil giant commits to No Deforestation

Blog entry by Bustar Maitar | 6 December, 2013

Wilmar International - the world's biggest palm oil company - has committed to a No Deforestation Policy. To put this into perspective, palm oil is the single biggest cause of deforestation in Indonesia and a growing threat in...

This is what ‘dirty’ palm oil looks like

Blog entry by Bustar Maitar | 22 November, 2013

Bumitama Agro, a notorious palm oil supplier to Wilmar with a track record of of forest destruction , has hit headlines in Indonesia. Yesterday it denied that it has “destroyed forest or killed orang-utans”, but promised that it would...

Who's going to take the Tiger Challenge next?

Blog entry by Areeba Hamid | 18 November, 2013

Greenpeace supporters are moving giants. The millions behind Greenpeace give our campaigns the power that pushes companies to protect our planet. Last week was proof. We have launched the Tiger Challenge, demanding big players in...

Protect Paradise

Slideshow | 15 November, 2013

An orang-utan graveyard, Wilmar, and the addiction to dirty palm oil

Blog entry by Wirendro Sumargo | 11 November, 2013 4 comments

This beautiful orang-utan sat just metres from me, serenely eating the fruit placed on the platform. It’s an incredible experience to see these creatures so close, and yet so at ease in their forest home. But this orang-utan represents...

Asia Pulp & Paper: from confrontation to engagement

Blog entry by Bustar Maitar | 29 October, 2013 5 comments

I’m usually concerned about speaking too soon, but it feels to me like the risk of Asia Pulp & Paper (APP) now reneging on its zero deforestation pledge is diminishing with every passing month. Breaking such a highly publicised promise...

APP's Forest Conservation Policy

Publication | 29 October, 2013 at 5:00

In February 2013 Greenpeace suspended active campaigning against Asia Pulp & Paper (APP) following the announcement of APP's Forest Conservation Policy (FCP), which includes an immediate moratorium on all further forest clearance by all of its...

Wilmar: making you, me and your mum part of forest destruction

Blog entry by Bustar Maitar | 22 October, 2013 1 comment

For most of the last year our team has been investigating and documenting gross acts of environmental destruction in Indonesia’s last remaining forests.  What these investigations reveal is a story of one massive, faceless company with...

Licence to kill

Publication | 22 October, 2013 at 5:00

As few as 400 tigers are thought to remain in the rainforests of Sumatra, which are vanishing at a staggering rate – a quarter of a million hectares every year. Expansion of oil palm and pulpwood plantations was responsible for nearly two-thirds...

Certifying Destruction

Publication | 3 September, 2013 at 5:00

Oil palm plantations are the largest driver of deforestation in Indonesia.

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