Solutions

Indonesia's plantation sector can – and must - make a genuine contribution to Indonesia’s development, rather than destroying the future for its people, its wildlife and the global climate on which we all depend.

Palm Oil

Greenpeace believes that palm oil can be produced responsibly. Palm oil production has been part of the livelihoods of local communities in Asia and Africa for decades, and can contribute both to economic development, while protecting forests and other ecosystems.

An example of this is the Dosan village on the Indonesian island of Sumatra. Palm oil producers, like the members of the Palm Oil Innovation Group, have shown that there is a business case for palm oil production that does not lead to forest destruction or violate the rights of local communities.

Greenpeace envisions palm oil production by local communities and industrial players that protects forests, and follows responsible agricultural practices while contributing to economic development and respecting the social, economic and cultural rights of local communities.

Wilmar International

Wilmar International, the world's largest palm oil trader, announced a No Deforestation Policy in December 2013 in response to pressure from Greenpeace, NGOs and consumers around the world. The policy has the potential to be a landmark win for the world’s forests and the people that depend on them for their livelihoods.

Wilmar International accounts for more than a third of global trade of palm oil, which means this policy – if implemented – could transform the industry. But while this policy is great news for forests and tigers, its success will be judged by Wilmar’s actions to implement and enforce it.

Greenpeace now challenges other palm oil traders and consumer companies to follow Wilmar’s path and ensure their palm oil is free from forest destruction.

Pulp and Paper

Asia Pulp & Paper’s (APP) Forest Conservation Policy sets a model for the pulp and paper industry. In February 2013 Greenpeace suspended active campaigning against APP following the announcement of its Forest Conservation Policy includes an immediate moratorium on all further forest clearance by all of its Indonesian suppliers while independent assessments are conducted to establish areas for protection.

If we are to turn the tide of forest destruction in Indonesia, we need many more companies to make commitments to end their role in deforestation. And we have to ensure that those companies that do make such commitments deliver on them.

Political Solutions

Greenpeace calls for permanent and full protection of forest and peatland, including a review concessions permits, governance and law enforcement, as well as the implementation of a responsible and just land-use planning system.

In May 2011, Indonesia introduced a two-year moratorium on permits for new concessions in primary forests and peatlands. While this moratorium was a welcome step in terms of the signals it sent, in practice most of the primary forests that it covers are already legally protected; the remainder are largely inaccessible and not under immediate threat of development.

More work needs to be done to harmonise spatial planning, develop sectoral policies and maps, as well as provide stronger law enforcement and mechanisms for resolving social conflicts.

Find out more here.

The latest updates

 

7 Greenpeace victories you made possible in 2014

Blog entry by Greenpeace USA | 27 December, 2014

It's been a great year for Greenpeace and our supporters. Getting toxic chemicals out of our clothes. Putting sustainable seafood in our grocery stores. Giant internet companies breaking away from climate-denying lobbyists. We could go...

Golden Agri Resources

Publication | 22 December, 2014 at 14:00

When Golden Agri-Resources (GAR) announced its ambitious Forest Conservation Policy (FCP) in early 2011, it aimed to position the company as an industry leader. GAR has collaborated with The Forest Trust to implement its FCP and to move towards...

Overwhelming evidence of APRIL's forest destruction in Indonesia

Blog entry by Zulfahmi | 18 December, 2014

The case against Indonesia's largest forest destroyer, APRIL, grows stronger by the day. Indonesian NGOs have found even more evidence that the company and its suppliers are trashing rainforests and are about to put endangered...

Wilmar's palm oil promise: One year later

Blog entry by Suzanne Kroger | 5 December, 2014 1 comment

One year ago this week, Wilmar International, the world's biggest trader of palm oil, announced an ambitious No Deforestation, No Peat land, No Exploitation policy. A few months earlier Greenpeace had released evidence of Wilmar...

Saving peatland with the President

Blog entry by Longgena Ginting | 27 November, 2014 3 comments

Today we made history in the protection of Indonesian peatlands. I’ve just got back from a monitoring trip to Sumatra’s devastated peatland forests with Indonesia’s new president Jokowi, where the president witnessed firsthand ongoing...

Momentum builds for No Deforestation palm oil

Blog entry by Suzanne Kroger | 25 November, 2014 4 comments

By now you know the problem: a rapidly expanding palm oil industry, eating up forests, draining carbon-rich peatlands, and sparking conflict with local people and workers. But if you had to guess at what is turning out to be a key...

Forests need laws, not loopholes

Blog entry by Kumi Naidoo | 25 September, 2014 3 comments

Sitting in the towering United Nation's building on New York's east side, it might be hard for world leaders to picture a destroyed forest, but I know just how depressing the site is. In Indonesia, and elsewhere, we've seen vast tracks...

Palm oil companies say they'll put forest destruction on hold. But what happens next?

Blog entry by Annisa Rahmawati | 25 September, 2014

Some of the world’s biggest palm oil companies have suspended their forest destruction. Is this a ceasefire or the end of their war on forests? We refuse to stand by while palm oil companies turn forests to plantations. We started...

Cargill's palm oil commitment

Blog entry by Joao Talocchi | 30 July, 2014

Cargill, the largest importer of palm oil into the United States, one of the world's largest commodities traders and a palm oil producer itself, made a pledge to break the link between its palm oil and deforestation, peat destruction...

6 myths this Indonesian logger didn't want busted

Feature story | 8 July, 2014 at 4:00

A new study published last week shows Indonesia's forests are disappearing faster than anywhere else in the world. In Sumatra and Kalimantan, much of this destruction is in forested peatlands. Draining and clearing peatland forests has a...

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