Indonesia's plantation sector can – and must - make a genuine contribution to Indonesia’s development, rather than destroying the future for its people, its wildlife and the global climate on which we all depend.

Palm Oil

Greenpeace believes that palm oil can be produced responsibly. Palm oil production has been part of the livelihoods of local communities in Asia and Africa for decades, and can contribute both to economic development, while protecting forests and other ecosystems.

An example of this is the Dosan village on the Indonesian island of Sumatra. Palm oil producers, like the members of the Palm Oil Innovation Group, have shown that there is a business case for palm oil production that does not lead to forest destruction or violate the rights of local communities.

Greenpeace envisions palm oil production by local communities and industrial players that protects forests, and follows responsible agricultural practices while contributing to economic development and respecting the social, economic and cultural rights of local communities.

Wilmar International

Wilmar International, the world's largest palm oil trader, announced a No Deforestation Policy in December 2013 in response to pressure from Greenpeace, NGOs and consumers around the world. The policy has the potential to be a landmark win for the world’s forests and the people that depend on them for their livelihoods.

Wilmar International accounts for more than a third of global trade of palm oil, which means this policy – if implemented – could transform the industry. But while this policy is great news for forests and tigers, its success will be judged by Wilmar’s actions to implement and enforce it.

Greenpeace now challenges other palm oil traders and consumer companies to follow Wilmar’s path and ensure their palm oil is free from forest destruction.

Pulp and Paper

Asia Pulp & Paper’s (APP) Forest Conservation Policy sets a model for the pulp and paper industry. In February 2013 Greenpeace suspended active campaigning against APP following the announcement of its Forest Conservation Policy includes an immediate moratorium on all further forest clearance by all of its Indonesian suppliers while independent assessments are conducted to establish areas for protection.

If we are to turn the tide of forest destruction in Indonesia, we need many more companies to make commitments to end their role in deforestation. And we have to ensure that those companies that do make such commitments deliver on them.

Political Solutions

Greenpeace calls for permanent and full protection of forest and peatland, including a review concessions permits, governance and law enforcement, as well as the implementation of a responsible and just land-use planning system.

In May 2011, Indonesia introduced a two-year moratorium on permits for new concessions in primary forests and peatlands. While this moratorium was a welcome step in terms of the signals it sent, in practice most of the primary forests that it covers are already legally protected; the remainder are largely inaccessible and not under immediate threat of development.

More work needs to be done to harmonise spatial planning, develop sectoral policies and maps, as well as provide stronger law enforcement and mechanisms for resolving social conflicts.

Find out more here.

The latest updates


Logging camp in Central Kalimantan

Image | 5 July, 2010 at 23:21

A logging camp in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. Indonesia's forests are home to 10% of the planet's diversity of plants and animals. Orang-utans, elephants, tigers, rhinoceros, more than 1500 species of birds, and thousands plant species are all...

Govs show Indonesian forests the money: 4 billion fund for forest protection

Blog entry by Laura K. | 28 May, 2010 5 comments

Indonesian forests got some love and some money this week. The money came in the form of a 4 billion USD fund contributed to by seven wealthy countries - US, UK, Norway, Germany, Australia, Japan and France - to be used for forest...

Sweet success for Kit Kat campaign

Feature story | 17 May, 2010 at 15:00

A big 'Thank You!' to the hundreds of thousands of you who supported our two-month Kit Kat campaign by e-mailing Nestlé, calling them, or spreading the campaign message via your Facebook, Twitter and other social media profiles. This morning,...

What does Nestle's (sort of) response mean?

Blog entry by Ruben | 29 April, 2010

Mr Brabeck-Letmathe & our activist at the AGM. Originally posted by Laura on April 27, 2010 9:21 AM Good question. After dropping into Nestlé's Annual General Meeting on April 15th to deliver the message that the largest...

Your messages to Nestlé shareholders: delivered.

Blog entry by Ruben | 29 April, 2010 3 comments

Originally posted by Laura on April 16, 2010 9:21 AM You sent over 200.000 e-mails to Nestlé and all we've gotten so far is a lot of repetitive statements from the largest food and drink company in the world. Yesterday we...

Activists 'drop' in to Nestlé shareholder meeting

Feature story | 15 April, 2010 at 16:50

Thirty activist 'orang-utans' greeted shareholders as they arrived for Nestle's Annual General Meeting today asking them to give Indonesia's rainforests a break and stop profiting from destroying rainforest, threatening biodiversity and...

Nestlé needs to give rainforests a real break

Feature story | 23 March, 2010 at 0:00

Nestlé has remained relatively silent since issuing its initial statement of contract cancellations with palm oil supplier Sinar Mas. This is despite the fact that it is still receiving a barrage of complaints and criticism via its Facebook page...

Caught Red Handed

Image | 17 March, 2010 at 8:07

Caught Red Handed

Caught Red-Handed: How Nestlé's Use of Palm Oil is Having a Devastating Impact on...

Publication | 17 March, 2010 at 0:00

Nestlé's sourcing of palm oil from from the company Sinar Mas- responsible for destroying Indonesian rainforests and peatlands- threatens already endangered orang-utans with extinction and is accelerating climate change.

Activists dressed as orangutans at Nestle's HQ in Croydon

Image | 17 March, 2010 at 0:00

Activists dressed as orangutans with banners and barrels reading "Nestle: Killer" target the confectionary giant over the use of palm oil in their products. Destruction of the rainforest for palm oil is destroying habitat of the endangered orangutan.

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