Solutions

Indonesia's plantation sector can – and must - make a genuine contribution to Indonesia’s development, rather than destroying the future for its people, its wildlife and the global climate on which we all depend.

Palm Oil

Greenpeace believes that palm oil can be produced responsibly. Palm oil production has been part of the livelihoods of local communities in Asia and Africa for decades, and can contribute both to economic development, while protecting forests and other ecosystems.

An example of this is the Dosan village on the Indonesian island of Sumatra. Palm oil producers, like the members of the Palm Oil Innovation Group, have shown that there is a business case for palm oil production that does not lead to forest destruction or violate the rights of local communities.

Greenpeace envisions palm oil production by local communities and industrial players that protects forests, and follows responsible agricultural practices while contributing to economic development and respecting the social, economic and cultural rights of local communities.

Wilmar International

Wilmar International, the world's largest palm oil trader, announced a No Deforestation Policy in December 2013 in response to pressure from Greenpeace, NGOs and consumers around the world. The policy has the potential to be a landmark win for the world’s forests and the people that depend on them for their livelihoods.

Wilmar International accounts for more than a third of global trade of palm oil, which means this policy – if implemented – could transform the industry. But while this policy is great news for forests and tigers, its success will be judged by Wilmar’s actions to implement and enforce it.

Greenpeace now challenges other palm oil traders and consumer companies to follow Wilmar’s path and ensure their palm oil is free from forest destruction.

Pulp and Paper

Asia Pulp & Paper’s (APP) Forest Conservation Policy sets a model for the pulp and paper industry. In February 2013 Greenpeace suspended active campaigning against APP following the announcement of its Forest Conservation Policy includes an immediate moratorium on all further forest clearance by all of its Indonesian suppliers while independent assessments are conducted to establish areas for protection.

If we are to turn the tide of forest destruction in Indonesia, we need many more companies to make commitments to end their role in deforestation. And we have to ensure that those companies that do make such commitments deliver on them.

Political Solutions

Greenpeace calls for permanent and full protection of forest and peatland, including a review concessions permits, governance and law enforcement, as well as the implementation of a responsible and just land-use planning system.

In May 2011, Indonesia introduced a two-year moratorium on permits for new concessions in primary forests and peatlands. While this moratorium was a welcome step in terms of the signals it sent, in practice most of the primary forests that it covers are already legally protected; the remainder are largely inaccessible and not under immediate threat of development.

More work needs to be done to harmonise spatial planning, develop sectoral policies and maps, as well as provide stronger law enforcement and mechanisms for resolving social conflicts.

Find out more here.

The latest updates

 

APRIL walks away from the FSC

Blog entry by Bustar Maitar | 19 June, 2013 1 comment

Did it see the writing on the wall? Notorious Indonesian pulp and paper producer APRIL has had a chequered history with the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC). But late last week we heard that the relationship has finally came to...

Down to Zero

Publication | 7 June, 2013 at 9:00

Through photos and campaign artwork, "Down to Zero" tells the story of our campaign to end the destruction of Indonesia's rainforests, and what you have helped us to achieve.

World Biodiversity Day

Slideshow | 22 May, 2013

International Biodiversity Day in photos

Blog entry by Bustar Maitar | 22 May, 2013 3 comments

On this International Day for Biological Diversity, we want to show you stunning images from one of the world’s richest places in biodiversity: Indonesia. From whale sharks, to abundant coral reefs and forests teeming with life, the...

Why we are happy, but not celebrating the Indonesian forest moratorium

Blog entry by Yuyun Indradi | 17 May, 2013 2 comments

I have been fielding calls non-stop over the last couple of days, because as you may have noticed, there has been widespread coverage lately (see here, here and here ) on the Indonesian government’s extension of its forest...

Forest destroyer kicked out of club

Blog entry by Suzanne Kroger | 14 May, 2013 3 comments

It was one of those days when we felt like change was in the air – even if it was a small victory it was an important one. Yesterday, we confirmed that notorious palm oil producer and forest destroyer, Duta Palma, has (finally) been...

Sailing through the world’s richest waters – Rainbow Warrior arrives in Indonesia

Blog entry by Bustar Maitar | 9 May, 2013 5 comments

I grew up in West Papua, which sits in the far west of the world’s biggest archipelago. I studied forestry in the province’s capital, but grew up in another city called Jayapura. If West Papua is considered frontier land, then Jayapura...

How rogue palm oil producers are getting away with forest destruction

Blog entry by Wirendro Sumargo | 25 April, 2013 8 comments

It always amazes me how the actions – or rather inaction – of high-level meetings in far-off cities can so seriously impact forests in my own country. Today, an organisation with the declared aim of ensuring environmentally...

A Dirty Business

Publication | 25 April, 2013 at 4:00

This crime file reveals the ongoing rogue activities of one of Indonesia's largest palm oil producers, the Darmex Agro group – generally known as "Duta Palma" – whose illegal and destructive operations were first exposed by Greenpeace...

APRIL, you can’t fool everyone

Blog entry by Bustar Maitar | 12 April, 2013 1 comment

Some companies just don’t get the hint.  You might claim to be sustainable, you might boast of your membership to corporate sustainability groups, and you might bandy around the United Nations to shore up your “green” credentials. ...

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