Solutions

Indonesia's plantation sector can – and must - make a genuine contribution to Indonesia’s development, rather than destroying the future for its people, its wildlife and the global climate on which we all depend.

Palm Oil

Greenpeace believes that palm oil can be produced responsibly. Palm oil production has been part of the livelihoods of local communities in Asia and Africa for decades, and can contribute both to economic development, while protecting forests and other ecosystems.

An example of this is the Dosan village on the Indonesian island of Sumatra. Palm oil producers, like the members of the Palm Oil Innovation Group, have shown that there is a business case for palm oil production that does not lead to forest destruction or violate the rights of local communities.

Greenpeace envisions palm oil production by local communities and industrial players that protects forests, and follows responsible agricultural practices while contributing to economic development and respecting the social, economic and cultural rights of local communities.

Wilmar International

Wilmar International, the world's largest palm oil trader, announced a No Deforestation Policy in December 2013 in response to pressure from Greenpeace, NGOs and consumers around the world. The policy has the potential to be a landmark win for the world’s forests and the people that depend on them for their livelihoods.

Wilmar International accounts for more than a third of global trade of palm oil, which means this policy – if implemented – could transform the industry. But while this policy is great news for forests and tigers, its success will be judged by Wilmar’s actions to implement and enforce it.

Greenpeace now challenges other palm oil traders and consumer companies to follow Wilmar’s path and ensure their palm oil is free from forest destruction.

Pulp and Paper

Asia Pulp & Paper’s (APP) Forest Conservation Policy sets a model for the pulp and paper industry. In February 2013 Greenpeace suspended active campaigning against APP following the announcement of its Forest Conservation Policy includes an immediate moratorium on all further forest clearance by all of its Indonesian suppliers while independent assessments are conducted to establish areas for protection.

If we are to turn the tide of forest destruction in Indonesia, we need many more companies to make commitments to end their role in deforestation. And we have to ensure that those companies that do make such commitments deliver on them.

Political Solutions

Greenpeace calls for permanent and full protection of forest and peatland, including a review concessions permits, governance and law enforcement, as well as the implementation of a responsible and just land-use planning system.

In May 2011, Indonesia introduced a two-year moratorium on permits for new concessions in primary forests and peatlands. While this moratorium was a welcome step in terms of the signals it sent, in practice most of the primary forests that it covers are already legally protected; the remainder are largely inaccessible and not under immediate threat of development.

More work needs to be done to harmonise spatial planning, develop sectoral policies and maps, as well as provide stronger law enforcement and mechanisms for resolving social conflicts.

Find out more here.

The latest updates

 

HSBC promises to cut ties with forest-trashing palm oil companies

Blog entry by Annisa Rahmawati | 21 February, 2017 1 comment

There's been a major breakthrough in protecting Indonesia's forests: HSBC has committed to  breaking its links to palm oil companies destroying forests and peatlands. This is a fantastic  result for everyone who has been campaigning...

I've seen the forest fires HSBC is helping to fund

Blog entry by Adi Prabowo | 13 February, 2017

The elderly gentleman approached me as our morning protest yesterday unfolded in front of HSBC’s Indonesian head office in Jakarta’s World Trade Centre building. Refusing the campaign postcard that I offered, his brow furrowed, he...

Revealed: HSBC is funding forest destruction

Blog entry by Annisa Rahmawati | 17 January, 2017 1 comment

Today we’ve let the cat out of the bag that HSBC - one of the biggest banks in the world - is funding destructive palm oil companies. Now its customers are waking up to the news that the bank card in their pocket is linked to the...

Dirty Bankers

Publication | 17 January, 2017 at 1:00

HSBC, headquartered in the UK, is currently one of the largest providers of financial services to the palm oil industry. HSBC has detailed policies on forestry and agricultural commodities (including specific sections on palm oil). It claims...

How palm oil companies like IOI have set Indonesia on fire

Blog entry by Adi Prabowo | 27 September, 2016

This morning, while most of the Netherlands was still asleep, my colleague Nilus and I - along with dozens of Greenpeace activists - slipped into Rotterdam’s port facilities. The temperature is just eight degrees celsius, my first time...

A Deadly Trade-off

Publication | 27 September, 2016 at 6:00

Over the last two decades, the plantation sector has laid waste to Indonesia’s forests and peatlands. Millions of hectares have been destroyed for pulp and oil palm concessions at great cost to wildlife, the climate and people.

Destructive palm oil company IOI let off the hook too easily by RSPO

Blog entry by Annisa Rahmawati | 10 August, 2016 1 comment

A major palm oil company, which had its sustainability certificates suspended for violating rules designed to prevent the destruction of Indonesia's forests and peatlands, has had those certificates reinstated. This shocking decision...

Palm oil giant IOI has lost customers for destroying forests, but will it change?

Blog entry by Annisa Rahmawati | 9 June, 2016

IOI - one of the largest palm oil companies in the world - is having a difficult time right now. Not only has it recently lost its sustainability certification , but as a result its customers are leaving in droves. And with good...

Burning Issue

Publication | 9 June, 2016 at 0:00

The Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) suspended Malaysian palm oil company IOI in March 2016 for breaches of RSPO principles. Since its suspension, IOI has lost many of its biggest customers. It responded with a lawsuit against the RSPO,...

When palm oil companies get banned, are they willing to change?

Blog entry by Kiki Taufik | 25 April, 2016 1 comment

As Indonesia's president announces a temporary ban on palm oil development, one of the world's biggest palm oil traders faces a customer revolt over its deforestation in Borneo… and it could lead to some big wins for forest protection.

1 - 10 of 208 results.

Categories
Tags