Indonesia's plantation sector can – and must - make a genuine contribution to Indonesia’s development, rather than destroying the future for its people, its wildlife and the global climate on which we all depend.

Palm Oil

Greenpeace believes that palm oil can be produced responsibly. Palm oil production has been part of the livelihoods of local communities in Asia and Africa for decades, and can contribute both to economic development, while protecting forests and other ecosystems.

An example of this is the Dosan village on the Indonesian island of Sumatra. Palm oil producers, like the members of the Palm Oil Innovation Group, have shown that there is a business case for palm oil production that does not lead to forest destruction or violate the rights of local communities.

Greenpeace envisions palm oil production by local communities and industrial players that protects forests, and follows responsible agricultural practices while contributing to economic development and respecting the social, economic and cultural rights of local communities.

Wilmar International

Wilmar International, the world's largest palm oil trader, announced a No Deforestation Policy in December 2013 in response to pressure from Greenpeace, NGOs and consumers around the world. The policy has the potential to be a landmark win for the world’s forests and the people that depend on them for their livelihoods.

Wilmar International accounts for more than a third of global trade of palm oil, which means this policy – if implemented – could transform the industry. But while this policy is great news for forests and tigers, its success will be judged by Wilmar’s actions to implement and enforce it.

Greenpeace now challenges other palm oil traders and consumer companies to follow Wilmar’s path and ensure their palm oil is free from forest destruction.

Pulp and Paper

Asia Pulp & Paper’s (APP) Forest Conservation Policy sets a model for the pulp and paper industry. In February 2013 Greenpeace suspended active campaigning against APP following the announcement of its Forest Conservation Policy includes an immediate moratorium on all further forest clearance by all of its Indonesian suppliers while independent assessments are conducted to establish areas for protection.

If we are to turn the tide of forest destruction in Indonesia, we need many more companies to make commitments to end their role in deforestation. And we have to ensure that those companies that do make such commitments deliver on them.

Political Solutions

Greenpeace calls for permanent and full protection of forest and peatland, including a review concessions permits, governance and law enforcement, as well as the implementation of a responsible and just land-use planning system.

In May 2011, Indonesia introduced a two-year moratorium on permits for new concessions in primary forests and peatlands. While this moratorium was a welcome step in terms of the signals it sent, in practice most of the primary forests that it covers are already legally protected; the remainder are largely inaccessible and not under immediate threat of development.

More work needs to be done to harmonise spatial planning, develop sectoral policies and maps, as well as provide stronger law enforcement and mechanisms for resolving social conflicts.

Find out more here.

The latest updates


10 shocking facts show how companies are still trashing Indonesia’s forests

Blog entry by Danielle Boobyer | 23 November, 2015

For months, forest fires raged across Indonesia bringing the world's attention to the country's devastating forest destruction. Both people and orang-utans were endangered as the fires raged and a thick, choking haze swept across...

Sad, scared, alone. The baby orangutan orphaned by the plantation industry

Blog entry by Zamzami | 13 November, 2015 3 comments

For half an hour Otan wouldn't let go. Only eight months old, he already had a vice-like grip, his nails digging so deep they left half-moon imprints in the skin of his carer. If there were trees, Otan would be swinging freely from...

4 ways to STOP Indonesia's forest fires

Blog entry | 2 November, 2015 8 comments

A brief spell of rainfall in Indonesia has minimised the number of fire hotspots that have been broadcasting toxic smoke across the country...for now. Here are four ways to #StoptheHaze…once and for all. 13-yr old sister holds...

"I'm tired of being made sick by this smoke"

Blog entry | 28 October, 2015

22 year old Indonesian student, Rahmi Carolina has spent her entire life living with the haze. Each year, as the fires rage and grow more intense, so does she. So she's using social media and doing something about it. Elementary...

The generation living under Indonesia's deadly forest fires

Blog entry by Zamzami | 7 October, 2015 1 comment

The impacts of Indonesia’s forest fires are being felt most amongst Indonesia’s young, turning them into the “haze generation”. I flew from Jakarta and landed in the city of Pontianak, the capital of West Kalimantan, in...

Choked in smoke - living in the thick of Indonesia’s haze

Blog entry | 11 September, 2015 2 comments

Smoke caused by forest fires and peatland destruction, is covering about 80% of Sumatra, Indonesia. And it seems like no matter how far you try to escape, the smoke follows. My wife and daughter should be at our home in...

How fixing palm oil could save orangutans from extinction

Blog entry by Achmad Saleh Suhada | 21 August, 2015 1 comment

The United Nations recently, and boldly, declared that orangutans could face extinction in Borneo. Why? Because deforestation is ‘simply unsustainable'. In Indonesia, we’ve shown that the palm oil sector was the single largest...

Company destroys plantations to protect forest

Blog entry by Awang Kuswara | 13 August, 2015

This is a story of how setting an example and persistently struggling for change can eventually lead to a turnaround by governments and seemingly recalcitrant companies involved in environmental destruction. “First they ignore...

APRIL, pulp and paper giant ends its deforestation

Blog entry by Bustar Maitar | 3 June, 2015

Indonesian paper giant APRIL just agreed to stop pulping the rainforest. With so many companies trying to put deforestation behind them, will Indonesia's President Jokowi follow their lead? We've achieved so much together. ...

The giants who had no hearts in their bodies

Blog entry by Suzanne Kroger | 27 April, 2015

How some of palm oil's biggest players are actively working against reform. Fairy tales, like the Norwegian story The Giant Who Had No Heart in His Body are meant to teach us that no good comes of greed, and that redemption is...

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