Indonesia Forests - Threats

Every year, Indonesia is losing 620,000ha of rainforest, making it one of the largest emitters of greenhouse gases on the planet. It also endangers species including Sumatran tigers and orangutans, and undermining the future for millions of Indonesians who depend on the forests for their food, shelter and livelihoods.

Indonesia's irreplaceable rainforests and carbon-rich peatlands are being destroyed to make the disposable consumer products we find in our shops: paper for our glossy magazines, toilet paper, packaging and palm oil for products like toothpaste and chocolate.

Greenpeace is campaigning for the immediate protection of all Indonesia's forests and peatlands including meaningful international support for a new green development pathway and for zero deforestation in Indonesia and globally by 2020.

To achieve this, we investigate the global supply chains that are sacrificing Indonesia’s forests for consumer products around the world, and we expose the companies that are destroying forests. Over the past few years, our campaigns and pressure from our supporters have led Nestlé, Unilever and other corporate giants to cancel big contracts with reformed suppliers like Sinar Mas. This in turn has led to commitments to forest protection on the ground from these same companies. But more must be done.

Today, Indonesia stands at a crossroads; will it choose to allow industry to relentlessly and unnecessarily expand into natural rainforests and carbon rich peatlands, or to announce a moratorium on all existing rainforest and peatlands, with the help of the international community?

The latest updates

 

Momentum builds for No Deforestation palm oil

Blog entry by Suzanne Kroger | 25 November, 2014 4 comments

By now you know the problem: a rapidly expanding palm oil industry, eating up forests, draining carbon-rich peatlands, and sparking conflict with local people and workers. But if you had to guess at what is turning out to be a key...

Forests need laws, not loopholes

Blog entry by Kumi Naidoo | 25 September, 2014 3 comments

Sitting in the towering United Nation's building on New York's east side, it might be hard for world leaders to picture a destroyed forest, but I know just how depressing the site is. In Indonesia, and elsewhere, we've seen vast tracks...

Palm oil companies say they'll put forest destruction on hold. But what happens next?

Blog entry by Annisa Rahmawati | 25 September, 2014

Some of the world’s biggest palm oil companies have suspended their forest destruction. Is this a ceasefire or the end of their war on forests? We refuse to stand by while palm oil companies turn forests to plantations. We started...

Cargill's palm oil commitment

Blog entry by Joao Talocchi | 30 July, 2014

Cargill, the largest importer of palm oil into the United States, one of the world's largest commodities traders and a palm oil producer itself, made a pledge to break the link between its palm oil and deforestation, peat destruction...

6 myths this Indonesian logger didn't want busted

Feature story | 8 July, 2014 at 4:00

A new study published last week shows Indonesia's forests are disappearing faster than anywhere else in the world. In Sumatra and Kalimantan, much of this destruction is in forested peatlands. Draining and clearing peatland forests has a...

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