Indonesia Forests - Threats

Every year, Indonesia is losing 620,000ha of rainforest, making it one of the largest emitters of greenhouse gases on the planet. It also endangers species including Sumatran tigers and orangutans, and undermining the future for millions of Indonesians who depend on the forests for their food, shelter and livelihoods.

Indonesia's irreplaceable rainforests and carbon-rich peatlands are being destroyed to make the disposable consumer products we find in our shops: paper for our glossy magazines, toilet paper, packaging and palm oil for products like toothpaste and chocolate.

Greenpeace is campaigning for the immediate protection of all Indonesia's forests and peatlands including meaningful international support for a new green development pathway and for zero deforestation in Indonesia and globally by 2020.

To achieve this, we investigate the global supply chains that are sacrificing Indonesia’s forests for consumer products around the world, and we expose the companies that are destroying forests. Over the past few years, our campaigns and pressure from our supporters have led Nestlé, Unilever and other corporate giants to cancel big contracts with reformed suppliers like Sinar Mas. This in turn has led to commitments to forest protection on the ground from these same companies. But more must be done.

Today, Indonesia stands at a crossroads; will it choose to allow industry to relentlessly and unnecessarily expand into natural rainforests and carbon rich peatlands, or to announce a moratorium on all existing rainforest and peatlands, with the help of the international community?

The latest updates

 

Palm oil: who’s still trashing forests?

Blog entry by Annisa Rahmawati | 3 March, 2016 3 comments

How 'clean' is the palm oil used by major brands around the world? Today, we're releasing the results of our investigation into which companies are keeping promises to stop deforestation in Indonesia for palm oil. Take a look now to...

Will Europe lead the way towards 'zero deforestation'?

Blog entry by Sébastien Risso | 2 December, 2015 2 comments

From the time we're in school, we are taught that forests absorb and store carbon dioxide, one of the main greenhouse gases (GHG) responsible for climate change, and that they produce and release oxygen. Yet despite the essential role...

Forest Reference Emission Level (FREL) report

Publication | 2 December, 2015 at 11:00

In September 2015, the Indonesian Ministry of Environment and Forestry (MoEF) announced the publication of a new Forest Reference Emission Level (FREL) report. This is the country’s official report to the UNFCCC, establishing baseline...

Meet the Indonesians taking climate action into their own hands

Blog entry by Yuyun Indradi | 2 December, 2015 5 comments

Just over a year ago, President Joko "Jokowi" Widodo of Indonesia - one of the biggest emitters along with the US, China and India - visited a local community affected by the forest fires and vowed to tackle the devastating crisis.

10 shocking facts show how companies are still trashing Indonesia’s forests

Blog entry by Danielle Boobyer | 23 November, 2015 1 comment

For months, forest fires raged across Indonesia bringing the world's attention to the country's devastating forest destruction. Both people and orang-utans were endangered as the fires raged and a thick, choking haze swept across...

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