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Greenpeace scientist Dr. Rianne Teule measures radioactive levels of a device from the nearby Tuwaitha nuclear facility. The device, abandoned on a roadside, contains yellow powder that is 1000 times background levels of radiation.

 

We are calling for a full assessment of the situation at Tuwaitha and other nuclear sites in Iraq. Find out what we discovered on our trip in June and July 2003.

One member of the Iraq team writes, "How do you tell someone they can't stay in their own home anymore? How do you look someone in the eye when you know that what little they have, they should abandon, even though they have nowhere else to go? We had to do that today. Another day looking for nightmares, another day finding them..."

The latest updates

 

You did it! Samsung will finally recycle millions of Galaxy Note 7s

Blog entry by Jude Lee | 27 March, 2017

Remember when we did this… Greenpeace activists create satirical scenes to show the explosion of the Galaxy Note 7 as well as how the device can be recycled at the front gate of the Samsung Electronics’ headquarters in Suwon. ...

Melting sea ice breaks new records — an Arctic sanctuary is more urgent than ever

Blog entry by Sophie Allain | 23 March, 2017 9 comments

With sea ice at record low levels this winter, the Arctic needs us now perhaps more than ever. Last week, a vote in the European Parliament showed that Arctic protection has become an established conversation in the corridors of...

Why Brazil’s rotten meat scandal is a big problem — and not just for Brazilians

Blog entry by Davin Hutchins | 22 March, 2017 4 comments

Food scandals like this happen more often than you think and may affect you more than you know — even if you don’t live in Brazil. Have you heard about the shocking rotten meat scandal that’s shaking the Brazilian society...

Samsung, the clock is ticking

Blog entry by Robin Perkins | 22 March, 2017

Galaxy Note7 is the most talked about phone release in years — unfortunately for Samsung however, for the wrong reasons. Anyone travelling on a plane since November anywhere in the world will have heard about the overheating issues...

How community land rights can save our forests and climate

Blog entry by Fionuala Cregan | 21 March, 2017 1 comment

Almost exactly two years ago, the local communities of Mahan forest, in the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh, had plenty of reason to celebrate. On the eve of the International Day of Forests 2015, they received news that their...

When reindeer have nowhere to run

Blog entry by Konstantin Fomin | 17 March, 2017

For hundreds of years the Khanty people of Western Siberia have lived in harmony with nature. But as the oil industry seizes more and more of their land, their animals perish in oil spills and reindeer herders are losing their last...

Mars and Nestlé just stepped up to protect the ocean and workers. Here's how.

Blog entry by John Hocevar | 16 March, 2017 2 comments

Thanks to the hard work of pet owners and activists like you, Mars and Nestlé — the two largest pet food companies in the world — are committing to make immediate changes to help ensure their pet food supply chains are safer for our...

In Brazil, dams threaten rivers, the environment and people's lives

Blog entry by Luana Lila | 14 March, 2017 2 comments

Today is the International Day of Action for Rivers: a time to remember and honour the communities who have been impacted by the construction of dams and the movements trying to prevent disastrous new dam projects. For Brazil, the...

The world is ready to Break Free. Will you join us?

Blog entry by Agustin Maggio | 13 March, 2017

This weekend marked the global kick-off of the Break Free movement calling for a world free from fossil fuels. Break Free is a wave of individuals, communities, local and international organisations taking a firm stance against...

Biological Restoration of water and land

Blog entry by Rex Weyler | 10 March, 2017

According to the 2015 World Economic Forum Global Risks 2015 Report, the water crisis is the world’s #1 risk. The problem is not only the amount of water available in the world’s rivers, lakes, and aquifers, but the pollution of...

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