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Greenpeace scientist Dr. Rianne Teule measures radioactive levels of a device from the nearby Tuwaitha nuclear facility. The device, abandoned on a roadside, contains yellow powder that is 1000 times background levels of radiation.

 

We are calling for a full assessment of the situation at Tuwaitha and other nuclear sites in Iraq. Find out what we discovered on our trip in June and July 2003.

One member of the Iraq team writes, "How do you tell someone they can't stay in their own home anymore? How do you look someone in the eye when you know that what little they have, they should abandon, even though they have nowhere else to go? We had to do that today. Another day looking for nightmares, another day finding them..."

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Once the mangroves are ripped out to make

Image | 1 May, 2002 at 1:00

Once the mangroves are ripped out to make way for shrimp farming, the coast is rendered unstable. Habitat for creatures like this turtle is eliminated.

A coati (member of the raccoon family) prowls

Image | 1 May, 2002 at 1:00

A coati (member of the raccoon family) prowls the mangrove forest.

In addition to shrimp

Image | 1 May, 2002 at 1:00

In addition to shrimp, mangroves also provide a nursery for fresh water oysters.

This magnificent frigate bird relies on the

Image | 1 May, 2002 at 1:00

This magnificent frigate bird relies on the mangrove forest for food and shelter.

Mangroves are home to many different forms

Image | 1 May, 2002 at 1:00

Mangroves are home to many different forms of wildlife, including this little green heron.

Mangrove seed pods

Image | 1 May, 2002 at 1:00

Mangrove seed pods. Some 35 percent of mangroves have been lost in the last 20 years.

Flowering mangrove plants.

Image | 1 May, 2002 at 1:00

Flowering mangrove plants.

Mangrove forest roots are bulldozed into

Image | 1 May, 2002 at 1:00

Mangrove forest roots are bulldozed into the mud to make way for the intruding shrimp farms.

Mangroves are the coastal equivalent to terrestrial

Image | 1 May, 2002 at 1:00

Mangroves are the coastal equivalent to terrestrial rain forests.

Panoramic view of a red mangrove forest

Image | 1 May, 2002 at 1:00

Panoramic view of a red mangrove forest, breeding ground for a diverse group of fish, shellfish, and other wildlife.

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