This page has been archived, and may no longer be up to date

War Dove

War on Iraq

Why we opposed war on Iraq

Greenpeace is opposed to war. We promote non-violent solutions to conflict. We actively campaign for the elimination of all weapons of mass destruction, held by any and all countries. Here are five reasons why we are opposed to the war in Iraq:
 
War would have devastating human and environmental consequences. The last Gulf war killed two hundred thousand people and left many of the survivors malnourished, diseased, and dying. Damage to ecosystems in the area remained years after the war ended. What are the consequences of this war? More  
War is an ineffective way to deal with weapons of mass destruction. There is a need for global disarmament from weapons of mass destruction that must be achieved through peaceful diplomatic negotiations. More  
Bush is clearly trying to gain control of Iraq's oil reserves. As Nelson Mandela has said, an attack on Iraq would be clearly motivated by George W. Bush's desire to please the US arms and oil industries. More  
This war is illegal and sets a dangerous precedent. Even Henry Kissinger argues that "the notion of justified pre-emption runs counter to modern international law, which sanctions the use of force in self-defense only against actual - not potential - threats." More  
It's hypocritical to single out Iraq. Other countries such as India, Pakistan and Israel all have weapons of mass destruction. More  

The latest updates

 

In December of 2003

Image | 7 January, 2004 at 0:00

In December of 2003, George Bush opened up vast tracts of Alaska's ancient forests for logging.

Chinese consumer challenges Nestlé

Feature story | 7 January, 2004 at 0:00

What motivated a mother from Shanghai to travel half way around the world to global food giant Nestlé´s HQ in Switzerland? In March 2003 Eileen Zhu Yanling was shocked to discover from the internet that Nestlé´s Nesquik milk powder, a product she...

Tasmanian forests under threat

Publication | 5 January, 2004 at 0:00

The Styx Valley in south-west Tasmania, Australia houses the world's tallest hardwood trees and flowering plants. The Eucalyptus regnans or 'swamp gums' in the Styx stand up to 96.5 metres tall and are second in height only to the famous Redwood...

U.S. Government paves way for logging in Pristine Tongass Forest

Publication | 5 January, 2004 at 0:00

The Tongass National Forest is among the world's largest tracts of remaining old-growth temperate rainforest and is under threat from logging. The Tongass is located in the southeast of Alaska's coastal archipelago and is the largest national...

Malaysia's Mega-diversity under Threat

Publication | 5 January, 2004 at 0:00

Malaysia ranks 14th on the list of the 17 mega-diverse countries that contain around 70% or more of the planet’s (terrestrial, freshwater and marine) biodiversity making them transcendental to global efforts of biodiversity conservation. ...

Patagonia A Protected Reserve of Life or home to a Giant Aluminum Smelter?

Publication | 5 January, 2004 at 0:00

The Aysén Region of Chile's Central Patagonia encompasses an area of nearly 11 million hectares (about 110,000 km2), an area about the size of Austria and Netherlands combined. It currently safeguards five million hectares of native forest, more...

Canada's Largest Ecosystem is being destroyed by Logging

Publication | 5 January, 2004 at 0:00

Canada's Boreal forest is one of the largest tracts of ancient forest left in the world. Almost 80 per cent of the world's original forests have been degraded or completely destroyed, making the protection of our boreal forest all the more...

Amazon under seige

Publication | 5 January, 2004 at 0:00

The Amazon Basin covers five percent of the land surface of the planet, extending over some 7.8 million km2. It has 25,000 km of navigable rivers and contains around 20% of the Earth’s fresh water. Its forests represent one of the most important...

Tanjung Puting National Park under Seige

Publication | 5 January, 2004 at 0:00

Illegal logging is rampant and out of control in Indonesia. It has permeated virtually every forest including areas that are protected from exploitation. In Central Kalimantan, the once pristine Tanjung Puting National Park is one of many...

Fished out

Publication | 5 January, 2004 at 0:00

The life of the oceans is being destroyed. Huge ecosystems, once thought to be resilient and inexhaustible, are collapsing. Populations of top predators, a key indication of ecosystem health are disappearing at a frightening rate, 90% of all...

11201 - 11210 of 13592 results.