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War Dove

War on Iraq

Why we opposed war on Iraq

Greenpeace is opposed to war. We promote non-violent solutions to conflict. We actively campaign for the elimination of all weapons of mass destruction, held by any and all countries. Here are five reasons why we are opposed to the war in Iraq:
 
War would have devastating human and environmental consequences. The last Gulf war killed two hundred thousand people and left many of the survivors malnourished, diseased, and dying. Damage to ecosystems in the area remained years after the war ended. What are the consequences of this war? More  
War is an ineffective way to deal with weapons of mass destruction. There is a need for global disarmament from weapons of mass destruction that must be achieved through peaceful diplomatic negotiations. More  
Bush is clearly trying to gain control of Iraq's oil reserves. As Nelson Mandela has said, an attack on Iraq would be clearly motivated by George W. Bush's desire to please the US arms and oil industries. More  
This war is illegal and sets a dangerous precedent. Even Henry Kissinger argues that "the notion of justified pre-emption runs counter to modern international law, which sanctions the use of force in self-defense only against actual - not potential - threats." More  
It's hypocritical to single out Iraq. Other countries such as India, Pakistan and Israel all have weapons of mass destruction. More  

The latest updates

 

Indonesian illegal logging

Feature story | 16 February, 2004 at 0:00

The Greenpeace ship Rainbow Warrior discovered barges loaded with hundreds of logs soon to be exported from Indonesia and suspected to have been extracted illegally. The logs come from a region that includes the Tanjung Puting National Park --...

Three teenagers from Thailand prepare traditional

Image | 16 February, 2004 at 0:00

Three teenagers from Thailand prepare traditional drinks and food during the UN Summit for the Life on Earth (Convention on Biological Diversity.) in Kuala Lumpur Malaysia.

Children from various parts of the world

Image | 16 February, 2004 at 0:00

Children from various parts of the world offer food from their countries at the UN Summit for Life on Earth (the Convention of Biological Diversity.) In Kuala Lumpur Malaysia. Their presence at the CBD is part of the Greenpeace "Kids for Forests"...

A young Brazilian teenager stands in front

Image | 16 February, 2004 at 0:00

A young Brazilian teenager stands in front of a inflated tiger during the UN Summit for Life on Earth (the Convention of Biological Diversity.) In Kuala Lumpur Malaysia.

A teenager from Cameroon (foreground) and

Image | 16 February, 2004 at 0:00

A teenager from Cameroon (foreground) and a girl from Canada (background) at the UN Summit for Life on Earth (Convention on Biological Diversity.) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Omanie Sakapeso from the Papua New Guinea

Image | 16 February, 2004 at 0:00

Omanie Sakapeso from the Papua New Guinea wears his traditional head dress during the UN Summit for Life on Earth (the Convention of Biological Diversity). His presence at the CBD is part of the Greenpeace "Kids for Forests" project where young...

Greenpeace activists temporarily halt the

Image | 15 February, 2004 at 0:00

Greenpeace activists temporarily halt the loading of woodchips at Triabunna Port, Tasmania. The action escalates the environment group's campaign to stop the destruction of Tasmania's old growth forests and the export of ancient forest...

Greenpeace identifies suspected illegal logs

Image | 15 February, 2004 at 0:00

Greenpeace identifies suspected illegal logs on a barge off the coast of central Kalimantan in Indonesia. These logs came from an area including the Tanjung Puting National Park -- home of dwindling numbers of orang-utans where logging is forbidden.

Patagonia revisited

Feature story | 13 February, 2004 at 0:00

The icefields in Patagonia are suffering from the fastest glacial retreat on Earth caused by global warming. Jorge Quinteros who first visited the area during an expedition 50 years ago, joined the Artic Sunrise to witness firsthand the speed of...

Visit Iceland: Save Whales

Feature story | 11 February, 2004 at 0:00

Despite the international ban on whaling, its spectre is looming on the horizon following the Icelandic Government's announcement to start a so-called 'scientific' whaling programme. Join our Iceland Travel Pledge to help stop the program.

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