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War Dove

War on Iraq

Why we opposed war on Iraq

Greenpeace is opposed to war. We promote non-violent solutions to conflict. We actively campaign for the elimination of all weapons of mass destruction, held by any and all countries. Here are five reasons why we are opposed to the war in Iraq:
 
War would have devastating human and environmental consequences. The last Gulf war killed two hundred thousand people and left many of the survivors malnourished, diseased, and dying. Damage to ecosystems in the area remained years after the war ended. What are the consequences of this war? More  
War is an ineffective way to deal with weapons of mass destruction. There is a need for global disarmament from weapons of mass destruction that must be achieved through peaceful diplomatic negotiations. More  
Bush is clearly trying to gain control of Iraq's oil reserves. As Nelson Mandela has said, an attack on Iraq would be clearly motivated by George W. Bush's desire to please the US arms and oil industries. More  
This war is illegal and sets a dangerous precedent. Even Henry Kissinger argues that "the notion of justified pre-emption runs counter to modern international law, which sanctions the use of force in self-defense only against actual - not potential - threats." More  
It's hypocritical to single out Iraq. Other countries such as India, Pakistan and Israel all have weapons of mass destruction. More  

The latest updates

 

Forest on the banks of the Congo river system

Image | 1 April, 2004 at 1:00

Forest on the banks of the Congo river system, Equatorial province, Democratic Republic of Congo. Greenpeace fact finding tour aimed at documenting the social and environmental impacts of industrial logging.

In George Orwell's classic "Animal Farm"

Image | 1 April, 2004 at 1:00

In George Orwell's classic "Animal Farm" it was the pigs who rewrote history. In the dystopia Monsanto is creating, they'll own those pigs.

Stephanie Tunmore

Image | 1 April, 2004 at 1:00

Greenpeace climate campaigner Stephanie Tunmore. Stephanie initially started working in the peace movement in the 80's before joining Greenpeace in 1989. Since 1996 she has worked on climate issues, leading campaigns against BP and Exxon's...

Piles of cables and computer waste awaiting

Image | 1 April, 2004 at 1:00

Piles of cables and computer waste awaiting scrapping. Wenling, zhejiang Province, China.

Chinese man smelts computer parts in the

Image | 1 April, 2004 at 1:00

Chinese man smelts computer parts in the open air to extract metals. Open air burning of computer waste releases large amounts of toxic fumes.

Chinese woman smelts computer circuit boards

Image | 1 April, 2004 at 1:00

Chinese woman smelts computer circuit boards over an open stove to extract metals. The fan is vain attempt to disperse the highly toxic fumes created by the smelting.

Piles of circuit boards from hazardous computer

Image | 1 April, 2004 at 1:00

Piles of circuit boards from hazardous computer waste stretch into the distance near an e-waste scrap yard. The circuit boards will be smelted by hand to extract metals. Smelting releases highly poisonous gases and pollutes the environment.

Truck overloaded with hazardous computer

Image | 1 April, 2004 at 1:00

Truck overloaded with hazardous computer waste on the way to scrapping yards.

Ford reverses plans to crush all its electric

Image | 1 April, 2004 at 1:00

Ford reverses plans to crush all its electric Th!nk cars. Ford had planned on crushing this environmental solution because it succeeded in trashing the California legislation that encouraged their use.

Ford plans to crush all its electric Th!nk

Image | 1 April, 2004 at 1:00

Ford plans to crush all its electric Th!nk cars despite being offered US$1million for them.

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