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War Dove

War on Iraq

Why we opposed war on Iraq

Greenpeace is opposed to war. We promote non-violent solutions to conflict. We actively campaign for the elimination of all weapons of mass destruction, held by any and all countries. Here are five reasons why we are opposed to the war in Iraq:
 
War would have devastating human and environmental consequences. The last Gulf war killed two hundred thousand people and left many of the survivors malnourished, diseased, and dying. Damage to ecosystems in the area remained years after the war ended. What are the consequences of this war? More  
War is an ineffective way to deal with weapons of mass destruction. There is a need for global disarmament from weapons of mass destruction that must be achieved through peaceful diplomatic negotiations. More  
Bush is clearly trying to gain control of Iraq's oil reserves. As Nelson Mandela has said, an attack on Iraq would be clearly motivated by George W. Bush's desire to please the US arms and oil industries. More  
This war is illegal and sets a dangerous precedent. Even Henry Kissinger argues that "the notion of justified pre-emption runs counter to modern international law, which sanctions the use of force in self-defense only against actual - not potential - threats." More  
It's hypocritical to single out Iraq. Other countries such as India, Pakistan and Israel all have weapons of mass destruction. More  

The latest updates

 

No War

Feature story | 24 September, 2002 at 0:00

What did we learn from the cold war, the disarmament movement of the last three decades, and the intricate history of arms control?

Illegal logs seized in the Amazon

Feature story | 22 September, 2002 at 0:00

After only three days, the river blockade mounted by local communities in the Amazon has stopped two illegal logging barges carrying over 200 logs. The barges have been impounded and the owner fined almost 200,000 Brazilian Reals - nearly US$ 60,000.

Two barges transporting over 200 logs of

Image | 21 September, 2002 at 1:00

Two barges transporting over 200 logs of illegal wood were impounded by IBAMA (Brazilian Environmental Agency) after a three days blockade by 40 small river boats in the Jaraucu river.

Greenpeace marks a maize field with signs

Image | 20 September, 2002 at 1:00

Greenpeace marks a maize field with signs showing corn with a 'question mark' indicating that 1 in 200 maize crops can be genetically contaminated if the draft EU seed directive is passed .

Activists mark a maize field with question

Image | 20 September, 2002 at 0:00

Activists mark a maize field with question marks. 1 in 200 maize crops can be genetically contaminated if the draft EU seed directive is passed.

Traditional forest dwellers blocked the

Image | 19 September, 2002 at 1:00

Traditional forest dwellers blocked the Jaracu river to protest against forest destruction.

Amazon diary

Feature story | 19 September, 2002 at 0:00

From a wooden, shallow-hulled river boat strung with colourful hammocks, activists describe days and nights travelling through the Amazon.

Pathway away from destruction

Feature story | 19 September, 2002 at 0:00

One of the most dangerous and unnecessary shipments ever to have taken place reached journey’s end on September 17th 2002 when it docked in the UK port of Barrow. The effect that this shipment’s 18,000 mile, 75-day passage, through some of the...

River blockade to save Amazon forest

Feature story | 19 September, 2002 at 0:00

With the name of Chico Mendes on their lips, people representing almost 600 Amazon forest dwellers joined by Greenpeace and other organisations blocked the bright green waters of Brazil’s Jaraucu river in the first such community protest in...

Seeds of doubt: North American farmers' experiences of GM crops

Publication | 18 September, 2002 at 0:00

A UK-based Soil Association report compiles all the latest data on economic and other costs to North American farmers of using GM crops.

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