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War Dove

War on Iraq

Why we opposed war on Iraq

Greenpeace is opposed to war. We promote non-violent solutions to conflict. We actively campaign for the elimination of all weapons of mass destruction, held by any and all countries. Here are five reasons why we are opposed to the war in Iraq:
 
War would have devastating human and environmental consequences. The last Gulf war killed two hundred thousand people and left many of the survivors malnourished, diseased, and dying. Damage to ecosystems in the area remained years after the war ended. What are the consequences of this war? More  
War is an ineffective way to deal with weapons of mass destruction. There is a need for global disarmament from weapons of mass destruction that must be achieved through peaceful diplomatic negotiations. More  
Bush is clearly trying to gain control of Iraq's oil reserves. As Nelson Mandela has said, an attack on Iraq would be clearly motivated by George W. Bush's desire to please the US arms and oil industries. More  
This war is illegal and sets a dangerous precedent. Even Henry Kissinger argues that "the notion of justified pre-emption runs counter to modern international law, which sanctions the use of force in self-defense only against actual - not potential - threats." More  
It's hypocritical to single out Iraq. Other countries such as India, Pakistan and Israel all have weapons of mass destruction. More  

The latest updates

 

Europe votes to accept world's strictest GMO labelling

Feature story | 3 July, 2002 at 0:00

Greenpeace welcomed a European Parliament vote for tightened regulations which give consumers and farmers in Europe the choice to accept or reject GMOs (genetically modified organisms) in the food they eat and the feed they use.

Nuclear neighbours face protest in Japan and Ireland

Feature story | 3 July, 2002 at 0:00

From the heart of an ancient temple in forested hills just in from Japans’ western coast comes an unlikely opponent to Japan's plutonium programme: Nakajima Tetsuen, Chief Priest at the 1200 year old Myotsuji temple.

Alstom must end days as dirty technology supplier

Feature story | 3 July, 2002 at 0:00

Greenpeace wants to remind shareholders attending Alstom's annual general meeting in Paris that the company makes money by selling dirty, polluting coal-based technology to the South.

Belgium must go wind, stop nuclear

Feature story | 3 July, 2002 at 0:00

Activists from the Greenpeace Choose Positive Energy Tour have sent a clear message to Belgian leaders that they must end the country's reliance on risky and expensive nuclear power.

Alstrom - Investing in Global Warming

Publication | 2 July, 2002 at 0:00

“More than ever, it is in our interest to meet environmental demands for sustainable development.” - It’s a paradox of today that a statement as seemingly unequivocal as this made by a global energy industry giant will likely turn out to be among...

Thai girl with pinwheel.

Image | 1 July, 2002 at 1:00

Thai girl with pinwheel.

Nuclear site in Takahama

Image | 1 July, 2002 at 1:00

Nuclear site in Takahama, Japan, under heavy guard for loading of rejected plutonium MOX fuel, which is being returned to the UK by ship.

Our correspondent in Johannesburg reports

Image | 1 July, 2002 at 1:00

Our correspondent in Johannesburg reports about something fishy happening inside the summit.

The Japanese nuclear industry at Takahama

Image | 1 July, 2002 at 1:00

The Japanese nuclear industry at Takahama loading BNFL plutonium mox fuel to be returned to Sellafield, UK in July 2002.

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