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War Dove

War on Iraq

Why we opposed war on Iraq

Greenpeace is opposed to war. We promote non-violent solutions to conflict. We actively campaign for the elimination of all weapons of mass destruction, held by any and all countries. Here are five reasons why we are opposed to the war in Iraq:
 
War would have devastating human and environmental consequences. The last Gulf war killed two hundred thousand people and left many of the survivors malnourished, diseased, and dying. Damage to ecosystems in the area remained years after the war ended. What are the consequences of this war? More  
War is an ineffective way to deal with weapons of mass destruction. There is a need for global disarmament from weapons of mass destruction that must be achieved through peaceful diplomatic negotiations. More  
Bush is clearly trying to gain control of Iraq's oil reserves. As Nelson Mandela has said, an attack on Iraq would be clearly motivated by George W. Bush's desire to please the US arms and oil industries. More  
This war is illegal and sets a dangerous precedent. Even Henry Kissinger argues that "the notion of justified pre-emption runs counter to modern international law, which sanctions the use of force in self-defense only against actual - not potential - threats." More  
It's hypocritical to single out Iraq. Other countries such as India, Pakistan and Israel all have weapons of mass destruction. More  

The latest updates

 

Greenpeace and community organisations in

Image | 5 July, 2002 at 1:00

Greenpeace and community organisations in Suva, Fiji demonstrate the Pacific people's opposition to plutonium shipments through the Pacific.

Surrounded by Japanese police and coast guards

Image | 4 July, 2002 at 1:00

Surrounded by Japanese police and coast guards Greenpeace inflatables protest beneath kites from the Mv Arctic Sunrise

Watched by Japanese police

Image | 4 July, 2002 at 1:00

Watched by Japanese police ,the Greenpeace ship 'Arctic Sunrise' and inflatables protest in Uchiura bay, beside the Takahama nuclear plant.

British nuclear freighters depart Japan en route to UK

Feature story | 4 July, 2002 at 0:00

A British freighter carrying enough plutonium to make 50 nuclear bombs is now on route through the Pacific ocean. The ship will pass South Africa then up to the Irish sea before reaching its final destination at a nuclear reprocessing facility in...

Activists stop Bosphorus oil tanker

Feature story | 4 July, 2002 at 0:00

Greenpeace activists stopped a massive oil tanker at the entrance of the Bosphorus Strait on July 4, sending a message that it's time for this dinosaur of an industry to come to an end.

Greenpeace activists board the oil tanker

Image | 4 July, 2002 at 0:00

Greenpeace activists board the oil tanker Crude Dio in the Bosphorus Straight entrance, into the Black Sea, as part of their campaign against climate change

The oil industry is represented as a dinosaur

Image | 3 July, 2002 at 1:00

The oil industry is represented as a dinosaur by Greenpeace today in the Bosphorus to announce the departure of its ship the MV Esperanza for the Earth Summit in South Africa.

Greenpeace holds a protest at the Philippines

Image | 3 July, 2002 at 1:00

Greenpeace holds a protest at the Philippines headquarters of the European energy company Alstom.

Europe votes to accept world's strictest GMO labelling

Feature story | 3 July, 2002 at 0:00

Greenpeace welcomed a European Parliament vote for tightened regulations which give consumers and farmers in Europe the choice to accept or reject GMOs (genetically modified organisms) in the food they eat and the feed they use.

Nuclear neighbours face protest in Japan and Ireland

Feature story | 3 July, 2002 at 0:00

From the heart of an ancient temple in forested hills just in from Japans’ western coast comes an unlikely opponent to Japan's plutonium programme: Nakajima Tetsuen, Chief Priest at the 1200 year old Myotsuji temple.

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