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War Dove

War on Iraq

Why we opposed war on Iraq

Greenpeace is opposed to war. We promote non-violent solutions to conflict. We actively campaign for the elimination of all weapons of mass destruction, held by any and all countries. Here are five reasons why we are opposed to the war in Iraq:
 
War would have devastating human and environmental consequences. The last Gulf war killed two hundred thousand people and left many of the survivors malnourished, diseased, and dying. Damage to ecosystems in the area remained years after the war ended. What are the consequences of this war? More  
War is an ineffective way to deal with weapons of mass destruction. There is a need for global disarmament from weapons of mass destruction that must be achieved through peaceful diplomatic negotiations. More  
Bush is clearly trying to gain control of Iraq's oil reserves. As Nelson Mandela has said, an attack on Iraq would be clearly motivated by George W. Bush's desire to please the US arms and oil industries. More  
This war is illegal and sets a dangerous precedent. Even Henry Kissinger argues that "the notion of justified pre-emption runs counter to modern international law, which sanctions the use of force in self-defense only against actual - not potential - threats." More  
It's hypocritical to single out Iraq. Other countries such as India, Pakistan and Israel all have weapons of mass destruction. More  

The latest updates

 

Logging by the French company Coron in Cameroon

Image | 1 May, 1999 at 1:00

Logging by the French company Coron in Cameroon.

Whales in Competition with Commercial Fisheries

Publication | 1 May, 1999 at 0:00

A Modern Myth Based on Pseudo-Science

Aerial view of dammed shrimp ponds

Image | 24 April, 1999 at 1:00

Aerial view of dammed shrimp ponds, with intact mangroves visible at the bottom. Previously a luxury item only consumed in some periods of the year, shrimp is now turning into an everyday product.

Digging up mangrove forest to build new shrimp

Image | 24 April, 1999 at 1:00

Digging up mangrove forest to build new shrimp ponds. To grow as many shrimp as possible and maintain overcrowded populations, large amounts of artificial feed and chemicals are added to the pools.

People sorting shrimps on long tables at

Image | 24 April, 1999 at 1:00

People sorting shrimps on long tables at the Ecuatesca packaging plant. Almost 50 percent of Ecuador mangroves have been lost, most of it attributed to shrimp farming.

Scenes of dead baby camels are not uncommon

Image | 10 April, 1999 at 1:00

Scenes of dead baby camels are not uncommon in Innner Mongolia. Mother camels do not have enough milk for the baby camels because desertification has eroded much of the grassland.

The Chain of Destruction: from the Great Bear Rainforest to the United States market

Publication | 1 April, 1999 at 0:00

The US remains the largest single consumer of forest products worldwide, consuming approximately 9.5 billion board feet of lumber alone per year — enough wood to make a board one foot wide by one inch thick that would wrap around the world more...

Greenpeace activists shadow pirate vessel

Image | 4 March, 1999 at 1:00

Greenpeace activists shadow pirate vessel caught fishing within protected Antarctic waters.

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