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War Dove

War on Iraq

Why we opposed war on Iraq

Greenpeace is opposed to war. We promote non-violent solutions to conflict. We actively campaign for the elimination of all weapons of mass destruction, held by any and all countries. Here are five reasons why we are opposed to the war in Iraq:
 
War would have devastating human and environmental consequences. The last Gulf war killed two hundred thousand people and left many of the survivors malnourished, diseased, and dying. Damage to ecosystems in the area remained years after the war ended. What are the consequences of this war? More  
War is an ineffective way to deal with weapons of mass destruction. There is a need for global disarmament from weapons of mass destruction that must be achieved through peaceful diplomatic negotiations. More  
Bush is clearly trying to gain control of Iraq's oil reserves. As Nelson Mandela has said, an attack on Iraq would be clearly motivated by George W. Bush's desire to please the US arms and oil industries. More  
This war is illegal and sets a dangerous precedent. Even Henry Kissinger argues that "the notion of justified pre-emption runs counter to modern international law, which sanctions the use of force in self-defense only against actual - not potential - threats." More  
It's hypocritical to single out Iraq. Other countries such as India, Pakistan and Israel all have weapons of mass destruction. More  

The latest updates

 

Warren Anderson

Image | 1 August, 2002 at 1:00

Warren Anderson, former CEO of Union Carbide, at his door in Bridgehampton, Long Island, New York.

Warren Anderson

Image | 1 August, 2002 at 0:00

Warren Anderson, former Chief Executive Officer of Union Carbide, at his door in Bridgehampton, Long Island, New York.

Marine mammals protest inaction on climate change

Feature story | 31 July, 2002 at 0:00

Marine mammals are fed up with Bush’s inaction on climate change, and his latest announcement that he will not attend the Earth Summit in Johannesburg has prompted protest on both coasts.

72% of the British public say no to nuclear

Image | 30 July, 2002 at 1:00

72% of the British public say no to nuclear power and yes to wind. Greenpeace projects poll result onto Sizewell nuclear plant in Suffolk, UK

Watch The Wind, speak out for clean energy

Feature story | 30 July, 2002 at 0:00

World leaders will meet for the Earth Summit in Johannesburg in less than a month. They will chose to lead us down the path of two possible futures – a world devastated by global warming and nuclear threat, or one powered by the force of the wind...

Greenpeace activists serve coffee and tea

Image | 29 July, 2002 at 1:00

Greenpeace activists serve coffee and tea to employees of the Board of Investments (Dept of Trade and Industry) in downtown Manila from a mobile solar powered cafe to promote the use of clean, sustainable energy. They gathered signatures on a...

Burning our Future

Publication | 29 July, 2002 at 0:00

The true costs of building coal-fired power plants and the case for renewable energy alternatives

Skippers' account of Nuclear Free Seas flotilla's Nuclear titanics encounter

Feature story | 25 July, 2002 at 0:00

"The two plutonium ships obviously had something to hide that could not bear the light of day..." Henk, the Skipper of the Tiama gives a first hand account about how a protest flotilla of 10 small yachts spread across 80 miles of ocean had BNFL...

Fight Esso's censorship

Feature story | 24 July, 2002 at 0:00

Esso succeeded in having a parody logo banned from the Internet in France, but Esso can not hide their own crimes against the climate. The censored site has been moved to oil country and Esso’s own backyard.

Fight Esso's censorship

Feature story | 24 July, 2002 at 0:00

Esso succeeded in having a parody logo banned from the Internet in France, but Esso can not hide their own crimes against the climate. The censored site has been moved to oil country and Esso’s own backyard.

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