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War Dove

War on Iraq

Why we opposed war on Iraq

Greenpeace is opposed to war. We promote non-violent solutions to conflict. We actively campaign for the elimination of all weapons of mass destruction, held by any and all countries. Here are five reasons why we are opposed to the war in Iraq:
 
War would have devastating human and environmental consequences. The last Gulf war killed two hundred thousand people and left many of the survivors malnourished, diseased, and dying. Damage to ecosystems in the area remained years after the war ended. What are the consequences of this war? More  
War is an ineffective way to deal with weapons of mass destruction. There is a need for global disarmament from weapons of mass destruction that must be achieved through peaceful diplomatic negotiations. More  
Bush is clearly trying to gain control of Iraq's oil reserves. As Nelson Mandela has said, an attack on Iraq would be clearly motivated by George W. Bush's desire to please the US arms and oil industries. More  
This war is illegal and sets a dangerous precedent. Even Henry Kissinger argues that "the notion of justified pre-emption runs counter to modern international law, which sanctions the use of force in self-defense only against actual - not potential - threats." More  
It's hypocritical to single out Iraq. Other countries such as India, Pakistan and Israel all have weapons of mass destruction. More  

The latest updates

 

Fight Esso's censorship

Feature story | 24 July, 2002 at 0:00

Esso succeeded in having a parody logo banned from the Internet in France, but Esso can not hide their own crimes against the climate. The censored site has been moved to oil country and Esso’s own backyard.

Fight Esso's censorship

Feature story | 24 July, 2002 at 0:00

Esso succeeded in having a parody logo banned from the Internet in France, but Esso can not hide their own crimes against the climate. The censored site has been moved to oil country and Esso’s own backyard.

Nuclear Free Seas Flotilla

Slideshow | 22 July, 2002

With a sucessful protest behind them the

Image | 22 July, 2002 at 1:00

With a sucessful protest behind them the flotilla yacths head homewards. For the dangerous and irresponsible nuclear cargo, more protests await on route.

Ian Cohen

Image | 22 July, 2002 at 1:00

Ian Cohen,MLC N.S.W Parliment, the Greens ,and crew member of the African Queen,one of the Pacific Peace Fleet Flotilla,Stuart Lennox, seen here in the water near the Pacific Teal, one of the two ships bringing plutonium through the Tasman.

Protest flotilla success: plutonium ship intercepted

Feature story | 22 July, 2002 at 0:00

The plutonium transport ships are large, fast and bristling with guns and security personnel. But they balked at the prospect of passing a tiny flotilla of sailboats armed only with cameras, because it posed one unbearable risk: exposing a deadly...

The N

Image | 21 July, 2002 at 1:00

The N.Z boat Tiama,with Henk Haazen, which forms part of the Nuclear Free Flotilla, seen here, midway between Lord Howe and Norfolk Island,where the Flotilla hopes to intercept the Pacific Pintail.

Security from the Phillipine's biggest coal

Image | 21 July, 2002 at 1:00

Security from the Phillipine's biggest coal fired power station, Sual, fire a warning shot to activists from the Greenpeace ship, MV Arctic Sunrise.

Greenpeace and Nuclear Free Seas Flotilla

Image | 21 July, 2002 at 1:00

Greenpeace and Nuclear Free Seas Flotilla between Lord Howe and Norfolk Islands in the Tasman Sea wait for the two armed nuclear freighters The Pacific Pintail and Pacific Teal to deliver their protest message.

Day of reckoning nears in the Pacific

Feature story | 21 July, 2002 at 0:00

Eleven small boats aim to show that the people of the Pacific do not want dangerous nuclear transports putting the whole Pacific at risk

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