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War Dove

War on Iraq

Why we opposed war on Iraq

Greenpeace is opposed to war. We promote non-violent solutions to conflict. We actively campaign for the elimination of all weapons of mass destruction, held by any and all countries. Here are five reasons why we are opposed to the war in Iraq:
 
War would have devastating human and environmental consequences. The last Gulf war killed two hundred thousand people and left many of the survivors malnourished, diseased, and dying. Damage to ecosystems in the area remained years after the war ended. What are the consequences of this war? More  
War is an ineffective way to deal with weapons of mass destruction. There is a need for global disarmament from weapons of mass destruction that must be achieved through peaceful diplomatic negotiations. More  
Bush is clearly trying to gain control of Iraq's oil reserves. As Nelson Mandela has said, an attack on Iraq would be clearly motivated by George W. Bush's desire to please the US arms and oil industries. More  
This war is illegal and sets a dangerous precedent. Even Henry Kissinger argues that "the notion of justified pre-emption runs counter to modern international law, which sanctions the use of force in self-defense only against actual - not potential - threats." More  
It's hypocritical to single out Iraq. Other countries such as India, Pakistan and Israel all have weapons of mass destruction. More  

The latest updates

 

As juveniles

Image | 1 April, 2000 at 1:00

As juveniles, transparent squid live in the upper ocean. However, as adults they live in much deeper water.

The giant squid is the world's largest invertebrate

Image | 1 April, 2000 at 1:00

The giant squid is the world's largest invertebrate. Rarely seen, the largest specimen ever recorded was 18 meters (59 feet) long.

The monkfish is also known as the goosefish

Image | 1 April, 2000 at 1:00

The monkfish is also known as the goosefish, anglerfish, or allmouth.

Black corals are actually brilliantly coloured

Image | 1 April, 2000 at 1:00

Black corals are actually brilliantly coloured when alive: only their skeletons are black.

The Ghost Shark isn't actually a shark

Image | 1 April, 2000 at 1:00

The Ghost Shark isn't actually a shark, but is closely related. It lives in waters between 200 and 1200 meters in depth.

Desmophyllum dianthus looks like the filamented

Image | 1 April, 2000 at 1:00

Desmophyllum dianthus looks like the filamented underside of a mushroom. The closest they reach the sea surface is in Fiordland at around 30m but more commonly grow in depths of 200m and down to 1500m. The golden coral is restricted almost...

The spiny seahorse.

Image | 1 April, 2000 at 1:00

The spiny seahorse.

Some Gorgonian Corals can live at great depths

Image | 1 April, 2000 at 1:00

Some Gorgonian Corals can live at great depths without sunlight.

Members of the Solar generation project installing

Image | 1 April, 2000 at 1:00

Members of the Solar generation project installing solar panels in an Indian village.

Members of the Solar generation project on

Image | 1 April, 2000 at 1:00

Members of the Solar generation project on a solar panel roof.

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