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War Dove

War on Iraq

Why we opposed war on Iraq

Greenpeace is opposed to war. We promote non-violent solutions to conflict. We actively campaign for the elimination of all weapons of mass destruction, held by any and all countries. Here are five reasons why we are opposed to the war in Iraq:
 
War would have devastating human and environmental consequences. The last Gulf war killed two hundred thousand people and left many of the survivors malnourished, diseased, and dying. Damage to ecosystems in the area remained years after the war ended. What are the consequences of this war? More  
War is an ineffective way to deal with weapons of mass destruction. There is a need for global disarmament from weapons of mass destruction that must be achieved through peaceful diplomatic negotiations. More  
Bush is clearly trying to gain control of Iraq's oil reserves. As Nelson Mandela has said, an attack on Iraq would be clearly motivated by George W. Bush's desire to please the US arms and oil industries. More  
This war is illegal and sets a dangerous precedent. Even Henry Kissinger argues that "the notion of justified pre-emption runs counter to modern international law, which sanctions the use of force in self-defense only against actual - not potential - threats." More  
It's hypocritical to single out Iraq. Other countries such as India, Pakistan and Israel all have weapons of mass destruction. More  

The latest updates

 

Gustavo Ampugnani from Greenpeace Mexico

Image | 1 April, 2000 at 1:00

Gustavo Ampugnani from Greenpeace Mexico inspects maize grown in an area known to be contaminated by genetic pollution.

GE rice is fool's gold because an adult would

Image | 1 April, 2000 at 1:00

GE rice is fool's gold because an adult would have to eat at least 12 times the normal intake of 300 grams to get the daily recommended amount of provitamin A.

Traditional farming methods support biodiversity

Image | 1 April, 2000 at 1:00

Traditional farming methods support biodiversity.

A Bangladeshi farmer using organic methods

Image | 1 April, 2000 at 1:00

A Bangladeshi farmer using organic methods plants young rice into soil that has been recently flooded.

Wheat.

Image | 1 April, 2000 at 1:00

Wheat.

Genetically engineered soya pods.

Image | 1 April, 2000 at 1:00

Genetically engineered soya pods.

Activists demonstrate against genetically

Image | 1 April, 2000 at 1:00

Activists demonstrate against genetically altered Starlink corn that was accidentally fed to animals.

Large genetically engineered (GE) salmon

Image | 1 April, 2000 at 1:00

Large genetically engineered (GE) salmon compared with smaller non-GE Salmon.

The Argus.

Image | 1 April, 2000 at 1:00

The Argus.

Head of the Ethiopian environmental protection

Image | 1 April, 2000 at 1:00

Head of the Ethiopian environmental protection authority and the non-profit Institute for Sustainable Development Dr Tewolde Egziabher.

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