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War Dove

War on Iraq

Why we opposed war on Iraq

Greenpeace is opposed to war. We promote non-violent solutions to conflict. We actively campaign for the elimination of all weapons of mass destruction, held by any and all countries. Here are five reasons why we are opposed to the war in Iraq:
 
War would have devastating human and environmental consequences. The last Gulf war killed two hundred thousand people and left many of the survivors malnourished, diseased, and dying. Damage to ecosystems in the area remained years after the war ended. What are the consequences of this war? More  
War is an ineffective way to deal with weapons of mass destruction. There is a need for global disarmament from weapons of mass destruction that must be achieved through peaceful diplomatic negotiations. More  
Bush is clearly trying to gain control of Iraq's oil reserves. As Nelson Mandela has said, an attack on Iraq would be clearly motivated by George W. Bush's desire to please the US arms and oil industries. More  
This war is illegal and sets a dangerous precedent. Even Henry Kissinger argues that "the notion of justified pre-emption runs counter to modern international law, which sanctions the use of force in self-defense only against actual - not potential - threats." More  
It's hypocritical to single out Iraq. Other countries such as India, Pakistan and Israel all have weapons of mass destruction. More  

The latest updates

 

Corporations must be accountable

Feature story | 4 June, 2002 at 0:00

Greenpeace called on governments to curb the devastation wreaked by big business, by adopting a set of principles formed in the wake of the Bhopal disaster.

Adverse impacts of GE Bt cotton

Feature story | 4 June, 2002 at 0:00

Research on the Chinese experience with genetically engineered (GE) cotton tells a story of resistant superbugs, emerging secondary pests, diminishing natural enemies, destabilized insect ecology, and increased pesticide use.

Protest against Nestlé

Image | 2 June, 2002 at 1:00

Protest against Nestle's "shut up and eat" policy of selling genetically contaminated baby food to Asia.

Dispensing polio vaccine

Image | 1 June, 2002 at 1:00

Dispensing polio vaccine. Solar chill technology will allow vital vaccines to reach remote areas to help save lives.

Amanda

Image | 1 June, 2002 at 1:00

Amanda, Greenpeace crew member on board the MV Esperanza

I remember making three

Image | 1 June, 2002 at 1:00

I remember making three-tired graves. In those three to four days we must have buried more than 4,000 persons, says Mohammad Aziz as he looks at these skeletons that have come out of the graves.

Genetically engineered wheat - Changing our daily bread

Publication | 1 June, 2002 at 0:00

Wheat is grown on an enormous scale world wide. The 560 million tonnes of wheat produced each year makes up more than one quarterof the world cereal output. Wheat forms an important part of many people’s diet in both the developedand developing...

Corporate Crimes

Publication | 1 June, 2002 at 0:00

Compiles cases of corporate crime from various industrial sectors, including the chemical, forest, mining, genetic engineering, nuclear and oil industries, from different parts of the world.

Empty promises: The “Rome Declaration on World Food Security” in 1996 and today’s...

Publication | 1 June, 2002 at 0:00

When representatives of 186 countries (112 of them heads of state) met in Rome in November1996, their declared aim was to secure a political commitment to tackle the underlying issuescauseing widespread hunger and malnutrition. They committed...

Food dictators won't feed the world - they are part of the problem

Publication | 1 June, 2002 at 0:00

Genetic Engineering (GE) has nothing to do with feeding a hungry world. The contrary is the case. The main reasons for hunger lie in social and political problems.

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