Fukushima: Don't Forget

End the nuclear age

Greenpeace has always fought - and will continue to fight - vigorously against nuclear power because it is an unacceptable risk to the environment and to humanity. The only solution is to halt the expansion of all nuclear power, and for the shutdown of existing plants.

Nastya, from Belarus was only three years old when she was diagnosed with cancer of the uterus and lungs. According to local doctors the region has seen a huge increase in childhood cancer cases since the Chernobyl disaster.

We need an energy system that can fight climate change, based on renewable energy and energy efficiency. Nuclear power already delivers less energy globally than renewable energy, and the share will continue to decrease in the coming years.

Despite what the nuclear industry tells us, building enough nuclear power stations to make a meaningful reduction in greenhouse gas emissions would cost trillions of dollars, create tens of thousands of tons of lethal high-level radioactive waste, contribute to further proliferation of nuclear weapons materials, and result in a Chernobyl-scale accident once every decade. Perhaps most significantly, it will squander the resources necessary to implement meaningful climate change solutions.  (Briefing: Climate change - Nuclear not the answer.)

The Nuclear Age began in July 1945 when the US tested their first nuclear bomb near Alamogordo, New Mexico. A few years later, in 1953, President Eisenhower launched his "Atoms for Peace" Programme at the UN amid a wave of unbridled atomic optimism.

But as we know there is nothing "peaceful" about all things nuclear. More than half a century after Eisenhower's speech the planet is left with the legacy of nuclear waste. This legacy is beginning to be recognised for what it truly is.

Things are moving slowly in the right direction. In November 2000 the world recognised nuclear power as a dirty, dangerous and unnecessary technology by refusing to give it greenhouse gas credits during the UN Climate Change talks in The Hague. Nuclear power was dealt a further blow when a UN Sustainable Development Conference refused to label nuclear a sustainable technology in April 2001.

The risks from nuclear energy are real, inherent and long-lasting.

The latest updates

 

Japan celebrates one year completely nuclear-free and the birth of a clean energy future

Press release | 15 September, 2014 at 18:15

Tokyo, 15 September 2014 – Today, Japan celebrates a unique and inspiring anniversary, a full year nuclear free, a year without the constant risks and threats of nuclear power.

Happy nuclear free birthday to the people of Japan

Blog entry by Kendra Ulrich | 15 September, 2014 28 comments

Every birthday is special – but today Japan is celebrating something unique. Japan has been nuclear-free for one year. Nuclear-free – a phrase that in its simplicity carries a devastating message for the worldwide nuclear industry,...

Belgium’s nuclear reactors are phasing themselves out

Blog entry by Eloi Glorieux | 13 September, 2014 5 comments

On Wednesday 10 September 2014 , Greenpeace activists in Brussels visited the politicians currently negotiating a new federal governmental agreement about the country's nuclear power supply. We were there to make it clear that...

Japanese regulator caves to the nuclear industry and government pressure – but still...

Blog entry by Kendra Ulrich | 10 September, 2014 1 comment

As with all things nuclear, things are not always what they seem. Good example - today's decision on the so called restarting of the Sendai reactors by the Japanese Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA), the best nuclear regulator in...

Floating nuclear power stations - history's warnings

Blog entry by Jan Haverkamp | 29 August, 2014 3 comments

After an unsuccessful try at selling floating nuclear power stations all over the world, including to Indonesia and Cape Verde,  Rosatom, the main nuclear operator in Russia, is now trying to tie up a deal with China . Russia is...

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