Monica Laflamme

Monica Laflamme - Canada

I live in Toronto Canada, but I’m originally from Kobe Japan, and I have lots of family and friends here. So when the Fukushima nuclear disaster happened it was a scary event for me. There are a couple of reactors close to Toronto, less than 30km from where I live now, and like Japan, our government is pushing ahead with nuclear without thinking through the risks properly. What happened in Fukushima can happen anywhere. This is a problem that affects all of the world, not just Japan, and we need to stop nukes now.

 

Daniel Szonyi

Daniel Szonyi - Hungary

They say: “If you climb Mount Fuji once, you are a wise man.” I say; if you keep using nuclear power you are a fool.
My name is Donci and I am climbing on this amazing Japanese mountain to show my solidarity with those affected in the last year by the disaster and to tell my government that keeping the Paks nuclear power plant instead of investing in the renewable energy sector is not just dangerous and expensive, but it is also a fool’s choice.

 

Tomasz Dziemianczuk

Tomasz Dziemianczuk - Poland

I am climbing Mt Fuji to show my disagreement to the Polish government’s plans to build the first nuclear power plant in my country. I think nuclear energy is a threat to mankind and the Chernobyl and Fukushima disasters have proven that. It is not safe and it is not cheap, as some might say. I wish Poland invested into renewable energy the same money they are planning to spend on a new power plant. I also do not believe in saying that building power plants would increase the employment rate as there would be only jobs for a small number of scientists and specialists.

 

Mateo Perez Garcia

Mateo Perez Garcia - Spain

Hello. I’m Mateo from the south of Spain. I’m climbing Mt Fuji to make sure that accidents like Fukushima are not forgotten. I don’t want to leave future generations a legacy of nuclear waste.

 

Arnaud Durand

Arnaud Durand - France

I am from France, the most nuclear-ised country in the world. The future is terrifying; the population does not seem to be aware that the disasters that happened in Fukushima and Chernobyl are also possible in any country that has nuclear energy. I want to protest and show solidarity with the people of Japan. A future without nukes and EPR is possible.

 

Christian Schmutz

Christian Schmutz - Switzerland

I am from Switzerland, the country with the oldest nuclear power plant in the world (Beznau). Here in Japan, the country of Fukushima, I am taking a stand for a nuclear-free, renewable future – all over the world!

 

Francois-Xavier Bleau

Francois-Xavier Bleau -  Canada

I am here to show, by climbing the iconic Mt Fuji, that nuclear power is a real danger in Japan, and everywhere in the world. We cannot live with this risk. The only control we have over the dangers of nuclear energy is to simply refuse it and make room for alternative sources of energy.

 

Alessio Ponza

Alessio Ponza - Italy

I’m Alessio, and first I’m here to show solidarity with the Fukushima people. I’m from Italy, a land less seismically-active than Japan, and we have already stopped with nuclear energy. I want to suggest to the Japanese people that they can pressure their government to stop gambling with nuclear power and switch to renewable energy. An energy revolution is both possible and necessary for future generations.

The latest updates

 

The beginning of the end for nuclear weapons

Blog entry by Jen Maman | 20 September, 2017

"I have been waiting for this day for seven decades and I am overjoyed that it has finally arrived,” said Hiroshima survivor Setsuko Thurlow in July, when a new treaty banning nuclear weapons was agreed at the United Nations in New...

Can the world come to its senses on nuclear weapons?

Blog entry by Bunny McDiarmid | 29 August, 2017 3 comments

Looking back, one of the key moments that was to define both my professional and personal path was the moment I stepped onto the small atoll of Rongelap, in the Pacific Ocean. It was 17 May 1985 and I was 24 years old. At first...

72 years after Hiroshima, where is Japan’s commitment to end nuclear weapons?

Blog entry by Yuko Yoneda | 4 August, 2017

Even with the passing of the UN’s Nuclear Weapons Ban Treaty, Japan still remains an outlier, betraying the hopes of atomic bomb survivors from Hiroshima and Nagasaki . It started with just 12 of them. With a bold mission, this...

Historic day at the UN: Nuclear weapons are now banned under international law

Blog entry by Jen Maman | 7 July, 2017 3 comments

Today at the UN Headquarters in New York, a global treaty banning nuclear weapons has been adopted.  This is an historic moment: according to the treaty, to possess and develop nuclear weapons is now illegal under international law.

Nuclear power and the collapse of society

Blog entry by Rex Weyler | 5 May, 2017 14 comments

On March 1 1954, on Bikini Atoll, in the Marshall Islands, the US military detonated the world’s first lithium-deuteride hydrogen bomb, a thousand times more powerful than the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs. The radiation blew downwind,...

Chernobyl: lessons not learned

Blog entry by Rashid Alimov | 25 April, 2017 2 comments

A greyish brick building with a bust of Lenin in front of it. A school in Stariye Bobovichi in the Bryansk region of Russia. There could be something nostalgic about this picture, were it not for the feeling of danger it gives. When...

Priorities? Global military spending just hit US$1.6 trillion

Blog entry by Jen Maman | 25 April, 2017 2 comments

Military spending worldwide is going up. 2016 has seen governments around the world spend US$1.686 trillion on their militaries according to a new repor t from the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI). Spending...

This treaty would ban nuclear weapons. But will the world take it?

Blog entry by Jen Maman | 31 March, 2017

“I’m here at the U.N. asking for an abolition of nuclear weapons,” said Toshiki Fujimori, a survivor of the Hiroshima atomic bombing, to diplomats from more than 120 countries gathered at the UN general assembly on 27 March. ...

They want you to think the Fukushima nuclear disaster is over. But it’s still with us.

Blog entry by Yuko Yoneda | 10 March, 2017 1 comment

Six years ago, over 15,000 people perished and tens of thousands of people's lives changed forever. Northeastern Japan was hit by a massive earthquake, followed by an enormous tsunami that wiped out coastal towns one after another.

Fukushima nuclear disaster and the violation of women’s & children’s human rights

Blog entry by Kendra Ulrich | 7 March, 2017

The 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear catastrophe may feel like ancient history in world constantly bombarded with news of the another tragedy or disaster. But for those who were impacted by the worst nuclear disaster in a generation, the...

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