Monica Laflamme

Monica Laflamme - Canada

I live in Toronto Canada, but I’m originally from Kobe Japan, and I have lots of family and friends here. So when the Fukushima nuclear disaster happened it was a scary event for me. There are a couple of reactors close to Toronto, less than 30km from where I live now, and like Japan, our government is pushing ahead with nuclear without thinking through the risks properly. What happened in Fukushima can happen anywhere. This is a problem that affects all of the world, not just Japan, and we need to stop nukes now.

 

Daniel Szonyi

Daniel Szonyi - Hungary

They say: “If you climb Mount Fuji once, you are a wise man.” I say; if you keep using nuclear power you are a fool.
My name is Donci and I am climbing on this amazing Japanese mountain to show my solidarity with those affected in the last year by the disaster and to tell my government that keeping the Paks nuclear power plant instead of investing in the renewable energy sector is not just dangerous and expensive, but it is also a fool’s choice.

 

Tomasz Dziemianczuk

Tomasz Dziemianczuk - Poland

I am climbing Mt Fuji to show my disagreement to the Polish government’s plans to build the first nuclear power plant in my country. I think nuclear energy is a threat to mankind and the Chernobyl and Fukushima disasters have proven that. It is not safe and it is not cheap, as some might say. I wish Poland invested into renewable energy the same money they are planning to spend on a new power plant. I also do not believe in saying that building power plants would increase the employment rate as there would be only jobs for a small number of scientists and specialists.

 

Mateo Perez Garcia

Mateo Perez Garcia - Spain

Hello. I’m Mateo from the south of Spain. I’m climbing Mt Fuji to make sure that accidents like Fukushima are not forgotten. I don’t want to leave future generations a legacy of nuclear waste.

 

Arnaud Durand

Arnaud Durand - France

I am from France, the most nuclear-ised country in the world. The future is terrifying; the population does not seem to be aware that the disasters that happened in Fukushima and Chernobyl are also possible in any country that has nuclear energy. I want to protest and show solidarity with the people of Japan. A future without nukes and EPR is possible.

 

Christian Schmutz

Christian Schmutz - Switzerland

I am from Switzerland, the country with the oldest nuclear power plant in the world (Beznau). Here in Japan, the country of Fukushima, I am taking a stand for a nuclear-free, renewable future – all over the world!

 

Francois-Xavier Bleau

Francois-Xavier Bleau -  Canada

I am here to show, by climbing the iconic Mt Fuji, that nuclear power is a real danger in Japan, and everywhere in the world. We cannot live with this risk. The only control we have over the dangers of nuclear energy is to simply refuse it and make room for alternative sources of energy.

 

Alessio Ponza

Alessio Ponza - Italy

I’m Alessio, and first I’m here to show solidarity with the Fukushima people. I’m from Italy, a land less seismically-active than Japan, and we have already stopped with nuclear energy. I want to suggest to the Japanese people that they can pressure their government to stop gambling with nuclear power and switch to renewable energy. An energy revolution is both possible and necessary for future generations.

The latest updates

 

General Electric, Toshiba & Hitachi hide from their responsibilities in Fukushima

Blog entry by Hisayo Takada | 5 March, 2013 5 comments

At 2:46pm, 11 March 2011, a massive earthquake and tsunami hit north east Japan, triggering three meltdowns at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Since then, an unthinkable amount of radioactive contamination has been...

Four things you should know about the Fukushima nuclear disaster

Blog entry by Laura Kenyon | 28 February, 2013 9 comments

The Fukushima nuclear disaster that began on March 11, 2011 was a scary time for the whole world. Some early reports even warned about radiation being carried on the wind as far as the west coasts of the USA and Canada, and many...

The nuclear reality: lives in limbo after Fukushima

Blog entry by Rianne Teule | 19 February, 2013 9 comments

As a nuclear campaigner, I have seen the nuclear industry walk away from its mistakes many times, ignoring people’s suffering. But it is the terrible effect on people of a nuclear disaster such as Fukushima that really brings home...

Fukushima Fallout

Publication | 15 February, 2013 at 23:30

From the beginning of the use of nuclear power to produce electricity 60 years ago, the nuclear industry has been protected from paying the full costs of its failures. Governments have created a system that protects the profits of companies while...

Ending the nuclear weapons age

Feature story | 15 February, 2013 at 11:00

The exact number of nuclear weapons situated across the world is shrouded in mystery, but whatever the number, North Korea's underground test this week is a grim reminder of the devastation and destruction these weapons could unleash.

The UK’s nuclear triple whammy is worse than you think

Blog entry by Justin McKeating | 6 February, 2013 32 comments

It’s being called a ‘triple whammy’ for the UK nuclear industry. And with what’s on the horizon - it’s beginning to look more like a quadruple or quintuple whammy. First, local representatives in Cumbria in the north of the country...

Beyond Nuclear

Publication | 6 February, 2013 at 0:30

After decades of market dominance, high profitability and the creation of strong shareholder value, Japan's nuclear utilities have seen their fortunes turn in the wake of the Fukushima nuclear disaster.

Bulgarians dismiss nuclear power by staying home

Blog entry by Jan Haverkamp | 29 January, 2013 2 comments

It was clear from the start that the first referendum held in Bulgaria since the fall of communism was going to be a farce. Last Sunday, January 27, the farce reached its conclusion. Bulgarians expressed themselves on the issue of...

More nuclear cynicism: Fukushima’s decontamination scandal

Blog entry by Justin McKeating | 28 January, 2013 1 comment

The unfolding radiation decontamination scandal in Japan’s Fukushima prefecture – the scene of the 2011 nuclear disaster – shows the nuclear industry at its cynical worst. As a nukes watcher for Greenpeace, I’ve seen a lot in my...

Nuclear history repeats in Niger

Blog entry by Justin McKeating | 21 January, 2013

There are many uncertainties surrounding nuclear power – how much will it cost, what to do with its deadly waste and when will the next accident happen? These are just three uncertainties, but certainly three of the most glaring issues...

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