Monica Laflamme

Monica Laflamme - Canada

I live in Toronto Canada, but I’m originally from Kobe Japan, and I have lots of family and friends here. So when the Fukushima nuclear disaster happened it was a scary event for me. There are a couple of reactors close to Toronto, less than 30km from where I live now, and like Japan, our government is pushing ahead with nuclear without thinking through the risks properly. What happened in Fukushima can happen anywhere. This is a problem that affects all of the world, not just Japan, and we need to stop nukes now.

 

Daniel Szonyi

Daniel Szonyi - Hungary

They say: “If you climb Mount Fuji once, you are a wise man.” I say; if you keep using nuclear power you are a fool.
My name is Donci and I am climbing on this amazing Japanese mountain to show my solidarity with those affected in the last year by the disaster and to tell my government that keeping the Paks nuclear power plant instead of investing in the renewable energy sector is not just dangerous and expensive, but it is also a fool’s choice.

 

Tomasz Dziemianczuk

Tomasz Dziemianczuk - Poland

I am climbing Mt Fuji to show my disagreement to the Polish government’s plans to build the first nuclear power plant in my country. I think nuclear energy is a threat to mankind and the Chernobyl and Fukushima disasters have proven that. It is not safe and it is not cheap, as some might say. I wish Poland invested into renewable energy the same money they are planning to spend on a new power plant. I also do not believe in saying that building power plants would increase the employment rate as there would be only jobs for a small number of scientists and specialists.

 

Mateo Perez Garcia

Mateo Perez Garcia - Spain

Hello. I’m Mateo from the south of Spain. I’m climbing Mt Fuji to make sure that accidents like Fukushima are not forgotten. I don’t want to leave future generations a legacy of nuclear waste.

 

Arnaud Durand

Arnaud Durand - France

I am from France, the most nuclear-ised country in the world. The future is terrifying; the population does not seem to be aware that the disasters that happened in Fukushima and Chernobyl are also possible in any country that has nuclear energy. I want to protest and show solidarity with the people of Japan. A future without nukes and EPR is possible.

 

Christian Schmutz

Christian Schmutz - Switzerland

I am from Switzerland, the country with the oldest nuclear power plant in the world (Beznau). Here in Japan, the country of Fukushima, I am taking a stand for a nuclear-free, renewable future – all over the world!

 

Francois-Xavier Bleau

Francois-Xavier Bleau -  Canada

I am here to show, by climbing the iconic Mt Fuji, that nuclear power is a real danger in Japan, and everywhere in the world. We cannot live with this risk. The only control we have over the dangers of nuclear energy is to simply refuse it and make room for alternative sources of energy.

 

Alessio Ponza

Alessio Ponza - Italy

I’m Alessio, and first I’m here to show solidarity with the Fukushima people. I’m from Italy, a land less seismically-active than Japan, and we have already stopped with nuclear energy. I want to suggest to the Japanese people that they can pressure their government to stop gambling with nuclear power and switch to renewable energy. An energy revolution is both possible and necessary for future generations.

The latest updates

 

Poland's nuclear energy programme stumbles again: Has PGE lost control of its...

Blog entry by Jan Haverkamp | 22 May, 2014 9 comments

In late February, during one of our regular strolls through the Lubiatowo dunes where the Polish government and the utility PGE are planning to build 3,000 MW of nuclear capacity, we found something peculiar. Bright orange sticks –...

The Chernobyl nuclear disaster: 28 years ago today

Blog entry by Kendra Ulrich | 26 April, 2014 20 comments

Today marks the 28th anniversary of the Chernobyl catastrophe, the worst nuclear disaster in world history. Located in the Ukraine, the massive radioactive releases – 100 times more than the Hiroshima atomic bomb – heavily...

There are no human rights on a dead planet

Blog entry by Kumi Naidoo | 16 April, 2014 3 comments

Yesterday I spoke at the International Association of Democratic Lawyers congress in Brussels. In the audience there were over 500 hundred progressive lawyers from over 50 countries. Many of these lawyers focus on human rights issues...

How Germany is revolutionising its energy system. And who's standing in the way.

Blog entry by Karsten Smid | 9 April, 2014 6 comments

As the UN climate panel meets in Berlin this week to finalise its report on options for combating climate change, here's how Germany is rising to the challenge. Rapidly reduce your reliance on coal? AND phase out nuclear power at...

Japan offers us hope in the face of more bad news from the IPCC

Blog entry by Justin McKeating | 2 April, 2014

The Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released this week makes for grim reading. The attitudes and behaviour of humanity is going to have to change and quickly if we are to save ourselves...

Japan should not be a nuclear playground

Blog entry by Kumi Naidoo | 24 March, 2014 26 comments

Op-ed originally published on Kyodo News. A busy playground beams with hope and echoes with giggles. It was in this safe place, three months after the disaster, that I heard infectious ripples of laughter from children going back...

The mythologies of thorium and uranium

Blog entry by Jan Beránek | 24 March, 2014 108 comments

Thorium and uranium represent the heaviest naturally occurring elements on Earth. Both were named after ancient gods: Uranus was the principal Greek god of the sky while Thor was the Norse (and broadly Germanic) god of a thunder. ...

The Nuclear Security Summit fails to address the big hazards

Blog entry by Jorien de Lege | 20 March, 2014 2 comments

World leaders are coming together at The Hague in the Netherlands next week for the Nuclear Security Summit to talk about what Barack Obama called "one of the greatest threat to international security": nuclear terrorism. That does...

Greenpeace activists occupy France's Fessenheim nuclear power plant to say "Stop...

Blog entry by Justin McKeating | 18 March, 2014 2 comments

Around 60 Greenpeace activists from 14 countries entered France's Fessenheim nuclear power plant this morning to send the message that the ageing plant should be closed. Our people unfurled a banner next to the Fessenheim Number 1...

Don't Forget Fukushima

Slideshow | 11 March, 2014

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