Monica Laflamme

Monica Laflamme - Canada

I live in Toronto Canada, but I’m originally from Kobe Japan, and I have lots of family and friends here. So when the Fukushima nuclear disaster happened it was a scary event for me. There are a couple of reactors close to Toronto, less than 30km from where I live now, and like Japan, our government is pushing ahead with nuclear without thinking through the risks properly. What happened in Fukushima can happen anywhere. This is a problem that affects all of the world, not just Japan, and we need to stop nukes now.

 

Daniel Szonyi

Daniel Szonyi - Hungary

They say: “If you climb Mount Fuji once, you are a wise man.” I say; if you keep using nuclear power you are a fool.
My name is Donci and I am climbing on this amazing Japanese mountain to show my solidarity with those affected in the last year by the disaster and to tell my government that keeping the Paks nuclear power plant instead of investing in the renewable energy sector is not just dangerous and expensive, but it is also a fool’s choice.

 

Tomasz Dziemianczuk

Tomasz Dziemianczuk - Poland

I am climbing Mt Fuji to show my disagreement to the Polish government’s plans to build the first nuclear power plant in my country. I think nuclear energy is a threat to mankind and the Chernobyl and Fukushima disasters have proven that. It is not safe and it is not cheap, as some might say. I wish Poland invested into renewable energy the same money they are planning to spend on a new power plant. I also do not believe in saying that building power plants would increase the employment rate as there would be only jobs for a small number of scientists and specialists.

 

Mateo Perez Garcia

Mateo Perez Garcia - Spain

Hello. I’m Mateo from the south of Spain. I’m climbing Mt Fuji to make sure that accidents like Fukushima are not forgotten. I don’t want to leave future generations a legacy of nuclear waste.

 

Arnaud Durand

Arnaud Durand - France

I am from France, the most nuclear-ised country in the world. The future is terrifying; the population does not seem to be aware that the disasters that happened in Fukushima and Chernobyl are also possible in any country that has nuclear energy. I want to protest and show solidarity with the people of Japan. A future without nukes and EPR is possible.

 

Christian Schmutz

Christian Schmutz - Switzerland

I am from Switzerland, the country with the oldest nuclear power plant in the world (Beznau). Here in Japan, the country of Fukushima, I am taking a stand for a nuclear-free, renewable future – all over the world!

 

Francois-Xavier Bleau

Francois-Xavier Bleau -  Canada

I am here to show, by climbing the iconic Mt Fuji, that nuclear power is a real danger in Japan, and everywhere in the world. We cannot live with this risk. The only control we have over the dangers of nuclear energy is to simply refuse it and make room for alternative sources of energy.

 

Alessio Ponza

Alessio Ponza - Italy

I’m Alessio, and first I’m here to show solidarity with the Fukushima people. I’m from Italy, a land less seismically-active than Japan, and we have already stopped with nuclear energy. I want to suggest to the Japanese people that they can pressure their government to stop gambling with nuclear power and switch to renewable energy. An energy revolution is both possible and necessary for future generations.

The latest updates

 

Don't Forget Fukushima

Slideshow | 11 March, 2014

Fukushima: we must not forget!

Blog entry by Dr. Rianne Teule | 11 March, 2014 9 comments

“Forgetting Fukushima makes it more likely that such a nuclear disaster could happen elsewhere,” said Mrs Tatsuko Okawara, one of the hundreds of thousands of victims of the Fukushima accident that began on 11 March 2011. Though...

Old nuclear reactors can't save the climate

Blog entry by Isadora Wronski | 6 March, 2014 10 comments

Yesterday, 240 Greenpeace activists from national and regional offices took action across Europe to highlight the risk of ageing nuclear reactors.   80 activists staged a decommissioning of the Tihange reactor in Belgium. A...

Ageing nuclear reactors – risky stumbling block for Europe's energy transition

Blog entry by Jan Haverkamp | 5 March, 2014 14 comments

Why the 'right to decide on the national energy mix' doesn't help national mix issues in reality, or why European leaders should support ambitious and binding EU wide and national targets for renewables and efficiency. Too...

Japan still doesn't get it: it is time to go nuclear free for good

Blog entry by Brian Blomme | 27 February, 2014 5 comments

Japan has released a first draft of a new energy policy that surprisingly, given the Fukushima disaster, still sees a future for nuclear in the country's energy mix. The plan also calls for an increase in renewables, but the call for...

Compelling stories of shameful treatment of Fukushima victims

Blog entry by Brian Blomme | 21 February, 2014 1 comment

When most of us think of the ongoing Fukushima nuclear disaster we think about leaks of contaminated water, criminal gangs hiring ill-trained workers to work on cleaning up radioactive materials on the site, ice-dams to stop water...

Nuclear Protest in Budapest

Image | 3 February, 2014 at 18:08

Greenpeace Hungary activists protest at Budapest’s Liberty Statue, against plans to expand the Paks 2 Nuclear Power Plant. Greenpeace calls on the Hungarian Parliament to withdraw their support for an extension of the nuclear plant. 2014-2-3

EU criticizes UK for state aid to new Hinkley C nuclear reactors

Blog entry by Greenpeace UK | 3 February, 2014

For a full briefing on the Commissions comments please go to Energydesk. The European Commission (EC) has delivered what can only be called a scathing initial verdict on the UK Government’s deal with French state owned EDF to...

Will a new lawsuit finally give some justice to the victims of Fukushima?

Blog entry by Justin McKeating | 31 January, 2014 2 comments

A joint lawsuit filed in Tokyo this week offers a glimmer of hope that those responsible for the Fukushima disaster might finally face justice … The 1,415 plaintiffs, including 38 Fukushima residents and 357 people from outside...

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