Monica Laflamme

Monica Laflamme - Canada

I live in Toronto Canada, but I’m originally from Kobe Japan, and I have lots of family and friends here. So when the Fukushima nuclear disaster happened it was a scary event for me. There are a couple of reactors close to Toronto, less than 30km from where I live now, and like Japan, our government is pushing ahead with nuclear without thinking through the risks properly. What happened in Fukushima can happen anywhere. This is a problem that affects all of the world, not just Japan, and we need to stop nukes now.

 

Daniel Szonyi

Daniel Szonyi - Hungary

They say: “If you climb Mount Fuji once, you are a wise man.” I say; if you keep using nuclear power you are a fool.
My name is Donci and I am climbing on this amazing Japanese mountain to show my solidarity with those affected in the last year by the disaster and to tell my government that keeping the Paks nuclear power plant instead of investing in the renewable energy sector is not just dangerous and expensive, but it is also a fool’s choice.

 

Tomasz Dziemianczuk

Tomasz Dziemianczuk - Poland

I am climbing Mt Fuji to show my disagreement to the Polish government’s plans to build the first nuclear power plant in my country. I think nuclear energy is a threat to mankind and the Chernobyl and Fukushima disasters have proven that. It is not safe and it is not cheap, as some might say. I wish Poland invested into renewable energy the same money they are planning to spend on a new power plant. I also do not believe in saying that building power plants would increase the employment rate as there would be only jobs for a small number of scientists and specialists.

 

Mateo Perez Garcia

Mateo Perez Garcia - Spain

Hello. I’m Mateo from the south of Spain. I’m climbing Mt Fuji to make sure that accidents like Fukushima are not forgotten. I don’t want to leave future generations a legacy of nuclear waste.

 

Arnaud Durand

Arnaud Durand - France

I am from France, the most nuclear-ised country in the world. The future is terrifying; the population does not seem to be aware that the disasters that happened in Fukushima and Chernobyl are also possible in any country that has nuclear energy. I want to protest and show solidarity with the people of Japan. A future without nukes and EPR is possible.

 

Christian Schmutz

Christian Schmutz - Switzerland

I am from Switzerland, the country with the oldest nuclear power plant in the world (Beznau). Here in Japan, the country of Fukushima, I am taking a stand for a nuclear-free, renewable future – all over the world!

 

Francois-Xavier Bleau

Francois-Xavier Bleau -  Canada

I am here to show, by climbing the iconic Mt Fuji, that nuclear power is a real danger in Japan, and everywhere in the world. We cannot live with this risk. The only control we have over the dangers of nuclear energy is to simply refuse it and make room for alternative sources of energy.

 

Alessio Ponza

Alessio Ponza - Italy

I’m Alessio, and first I’m here to show solidarity with the Fukushima people. I’m from Italy, a land less seismically-active than Japan, and we have already stopped with nuclear energy. I want to suggest to the Japanese people that they can pressure their government to stop gambling with nuclear power and switch to renewable energy. An energy revolution is both possible and necessary for future generations.

The latest updates

 

Fukushima Nuclear Crisis Update for 9 August to 12 August 2013

Blog entry by Christine McCann | 13 August, 2013 4 comments

State of the Fukushima Reactors In an effort to deal with its ongoing water crisis, TEPCO began to pump up contaminated groundwater from a new well at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant at the end of last week, in order to reduce...

7 things you missed from Kumi Naidoo’s AMA on Reddit

Blog entry by Kumi Naidoo | 12 August, 2013

Ask me anything, as Reddit arranges is a risky proposition, one that I relished, but that also made me a little nervous. Smart, funny and incisive questions came in fast and furious. It was a struggle to keep up. I did my best and...

Time for Japan to take control of the Fukushima disaster

Blog entry by Aslihan Tumer | 7 August, 2013 10 comments

For more than two years we have watched how the Fukushima nuclear plant operator TEPCO has failed to take control of the disaster or be transparent about the real situation at the stricken plant, trying to hide problems such as leaking...

Fukushima Nuclear Crisis Update for August 2nd to August 5th, 2013

Blog entry by Christine McCann | 7 August, 2013 5 comments

Here’s the latest of our news bulletins from the ongoing crisis at Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.   State of the Fukushima Reactors In response to worsening news about the radioactive water crisis in...

Fukushima clean up costs hit $58 billion

Blog entry by Justin McKeating | 2 August, 2013 1 comment

...or 5.81 trillion yen. That's five times more than first estimated and the Japanese government has so far only allocated one trillion yen. These rocketing costs are unlikely to stop there. This figure doesn't even include the...

Fukushima crisis rolls on as TEPCO admits radiation leaks

Blog entry by Justin McKeating | 24 July, 2013 7 comments

TEPCO, the owner of the stricken Fukushima nuclear power plant, has admitted that the damaged reactors are leaking highly toxic radioactive contamination into the Pacific Ocean – confirming what many of us had feared for some time.

The nuclear industry is back at the EU with its begging bowl once again

Blog entry by Justin McKeating | 19 July, 2013

The nuclear industry has had 60 years to come up with a way of financing itself. In that time it has failed utterly to do so. Decade after decade it has had to rely on taxpayers and government subsidies to build its reactors. It's...

Greenpeace's Shard ascent reminds us of the power of civil disobedience

Blog entry by Kumi Naidoo | 18 July, 2013 3 comments

Article originally published in the Guardian. Does it all seem too hard? Does it feel like governments and corporations will always get away with it in the end? Do you ask yourself what one person alone can do? Greenpeace is part...

The diminishing glow of nuclear energy

Blog entry by Arin de Hoog | 15 July, 2013 26 comments

In France, Greenpeace activists got past security and climbed reactor structures at the Tricastin nuclear power plant. They unfurled a banner which read: TRICASTIN ACCIDENT NUCLÉAIRE: PRÉSIDENT DE LA CATASTROPHE? (Tricastin Nuclear...

Kori Nuclear Reactor, South Korea

Image | 15 July, 2013 at 12:17

The Rainbow Warrior is seen in front of the Kori 1 nuclear reactor, with a banner reading (in Korean): 'Chernobyl! Fukushima!, Busan?' as Greenpeace call for a nuclear energy phase out starting with the Kori 1 reactor, the oldest nuclear...

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