Monica Laflamme

Monica Laflamme - Canada

I live in Toronto Canada, but I’m originally from Kobe Japan, and I have lots of family and friends here. So when the Fukushima nuclear disaster happened it was a scary event for me. There are a couple of reactors close to Toronto, less than 30km from where I live now, and like Japan, our government is pushing ahead with nuclear without thinking through the risks properly. What happened in Fukushima can happen anywhere. This is a problem that affects all of the world, not just Japan, and we need to stop nukes now.

 

Daniel Szonyi

Daniel Szonyi - Hungary

They say: “If you climb Mount Fuji once, you are a wise man.” I say; if you keep using nuclear power you are a fool.
My name is Donci and I am climbing on this amazing Japanese mountain to show my solidarity with those affected in the last year by the disaster and to tell my government that keeping the Paks nuclear power plant instead of investing in the renewable energy sector is not just dangerous and expensive, but it is also a fool’s choice.

 

Tomasz Dziemianczuk

Tomasz Dziemianczuk - Poland

I am climbing Mt Fuji to show my disagreement to the Polish government’s plans to build the first nuclear power plant in my country. I think nuclear energy is a threat to mankind and the Chernobyl and Fukushima disasters have proven that. It is not safe and it is not cheap, as some might say. I wish Poland invested into renewable energy the same money they are planning to spend on a new power plant. I also do not believe in saying that building power plants would increase the employment rate as there would be only jobs for a small number of scientists and specialists.

 

Mateo Perez Garcia

Mateo Perez Garcia - Spain

Hello. I’m Mateo from the south of Spain. I’m climbing Mt Fuji to make sure that accidents like Fukushima are not forgotten. I don’t want to leave future generations a legacy of nuclear waste.

 

Arnaud Durand

Arnaud Durand - France

I am from France, the most nuclear-ised country in the world. The future is terrifying; the population does not seem to be aware that the disasters that happened in Fukushima and Chernobyl are also possible in any country that has nuclear energy. I want to protest and show solidarity with the people of Japan. A future without nukes and EPR is possible.

 

Christian Schmutz

Christian Schmutz - Switzerland

I am from Switzerland, the country with the oldest nuclear power plant in the world (Beznau). Here in Japan, the country of Fukushima, I am taking a stand for a nuclear-free, renewable future – all over the world!

 

Francois-Xavier Bleau

Francois-Xavier Bleau -  Canada

I am here to show, by climbing the iconic Mt Fuji, that nuclear power is a real danger in Japan, and everywhere in the world. We cannot live with this risk. The only control we have over the dangers of nuclear energy is to simply refuse it and make room for alternative sources of energy.

 

Alessio Ponza

Alessio Ponza - Italy

I’m Alessio, and first I’m here to show solidarity with the Fukushima people. I’m from Italy, a land less seismically-active than Japan, and we have already stopped with nuclear energy. I want to suggest to the Japanese people that they can pressure their government to stop gambling with nuclear power and switch to renewable energy. An energy revolution is both possible and necessary for future generations.

The latest updates

 

Protest at Tricastin Power Plant

Image | 15 July, 2013 at 12:13

Greenpeace activists enter Tricastin Nuclear Power Plant and unfurl a banner reading: TRICASTIN ACCIDENT NUCLÉAIRE: PRÉSIDENT DE LA CATASTROPHE? (Tricastin Nuclear Accident: President of the Disaster?). Other activists projected images of a...

Nuclear Emergency Camp

Image | 11 July, 2013 at 22:20

Greenpeace activists from Korea, Indonesia, Taiwan and the United States are escorted by Korean police after a three day protest at the iconic Gwangandaegyo Bridge concluded peacefully in Busan, South Korea. The activists are demanding the Korean...

130 metres high in Busan, South Korea

Blog entry by Jun Kwon Song | 10 July, 2013

Today is my second day, 130 metres in the air, on the Gwangan Bridge in Busan, South Korea. This bridge is the symbol of Busan and I'm here with a simple message to the people of Busan: You are living in a danger zone. The other...

Nuclear Emergency Camp

Image | 10 July, 2013 at 11:55

10 July 2013. The Greenpeace ship, Rainbow Warrior arrives in the port of Busan, South Korea. Greenpeace is calling for the Korean government to widen the official nuclear evacuation zone to a thirty kilometer radius.

Nuclear Emergency Camp

Image | 9 July, 2013 at 11:50

Greenpeace activists set up a hanging nuclear emergency camp between suspension cables on Busan's iconic Gwangandaegyo bridge, calling for the Korean government to widen the official nuclear evacuation zone to a thirty kilometer radius.

TEPCO fails on its responsibilities from the Fukushima disaster

Blog entry by Ayako Sekine | 27 June, 2013 2 comments

I went to the TEPCO annual general meeting for its shareholders on Tuesday to create a stronger public discussion of the failure of TEPCO to live up to its responsibilities following the Fukushima nuclear disaster. First, though my...

It’s time for nuclear gamblers to settle their debts.

Blog entry by Justin McKeating | 25 June, 2013 1 comment

For sixty years the nuclear industry has gambled with the lives and safety of millions of people. It has bet that nothing will ever go wrong with their reactors. This gamble puts all the risks on the public.   In Tokyo, Greenpeace...

Creative forces behind environmentalism, lit by the Mediterranean sun

Blog entry by Arin de Hoog | 21 June, 2013

Cannes and Greenpeace; not normally two things you'd link together. This year, however, Greenpeace made its presence known as the Southern French town glitzed and glamoured its way through summer film and media festivals. Greenpeace...

It’s time Japan's government and nuclear industry faced its responsibilities at Fukushima

Blog entry by Justin McKeating | 21 June, 2013 3 comments

Have you ever tried to dodge your responsibility for something? Maybe in a small way, many of us do. But I doubt you dodge responsibility the way the nuclear industry does or the way Japanese Prime Minister Abe does. In Tokyo...

South Korea's faked safety certificates: just another nuclear scandal

Blog entry by Justin McKeating | 28 May, 2013 13 comments

One of the defining factors of the nuclear industry is its refusal to learn the lessons of the past. It's built a lousy reputation for trust and transparency and public confidence in the industry has been massively dented by repeated...

61 - 70 of 785 results.



Categories