Monica Laflamme

Monica Laflamme - Canada

I live in Toronto Canada, but I’m originally from Kobe Japan, and I have lots of family and friends here. So when the Fukushima nuclear disaster happened it was a scary event for me. There are a couple of reactors close to Toronto, less than 30km from where I live now, and like Japan, our government is pushing ahead with nuclear without thinking through the risks properly. What happened in Fukushima can happen anywhere. This is a problem that affects all of the world, not just Japan, and we need to stop nukes now.


Daniel Szonyi

Daniel Szonyi - Hungary

They say: “If you climb Mount Fuji once, you are a wise man.” I say; if you keep using nuclear power you are a fool.
My name is Donci and I am climbing on this amazing Japanese mountain to show my solidarity with those affected in the last year by the disaster and to tell my government that keeping the Paks nuclear power plant instead of investing in the renewable energy sector is not just dangerous and expensive, but it is also a fool’s choice.


Tomasz Dziemianczuk

Tomasz Dziemianczuk - Poland

I am climbing Mt Fuji to show my disagreement to the Polish government’s plans to build the first nuclear power plant in my country. I think nuclear energy is a threat to mankind and the Chernobyl and Fukushima disasters have proven that. It is not safe and it is not cheap, as some might say. I wish Poland invested into renewable energy the same money they are planning to spend on a new power plant. I also do not believe in saying that building power plants would increase the employment rate as there would be only jobs for a small number of scientists and specialists.


Mateo Perez Garcia

Mateo Perez Garcia - Spain

Hello. I’m Mateo from the south of Spain. I’m climbing Mt Fuji to make sure that accidents like Fukushima are not forgotten. I don’t want to leave future generations a legacy of nuclear waste.


Arnaud Durand

Arnaud Durand - France

I am from France, the most nuclear-ised country in the world. The future is terrifying; the population does not seem to be aware that the disasters that happened in Fukushima and Chernobyl are also possible in any country that has nuclear energy. I want to protest and show solidarity with the people of Japan. A future without nukes and EPR is possible.


Christian Schmutz

Christian Schmutz - Switzerland

I am from Switzerland, the country with the oldest nuclear power plant in the world (Beznau). Here in Japan, the country of Fukushima, I am taking a stand for a nuclear-free, renewable future – all over the world!


Francois-Xavier Bleau

Francois-Xavier Bleau -  Canada

I am here to show, by climbing the iconic Mt Fuji, that nuclear power is a real danger in Japan, and everywhere in the world. We cannot live with this risk. The only control we have over the dangers of nuclear energy is to simply refuse it and make room for alternative sources of energy.


Alessio Ponza

Alessio Ponza - Italy

I’m Alessio, and first I’m here to show solidarity with the Fukushima people. I’m from Italy, a land less seismically-active than Japan, and we have already stopped with nuclear energy. I want to suggest to the Japanese people that they can pressure their government to stop gambling with nuclear power and switch to renewable energy. An energy revolution is both possible and necessary for future generations.

The latest updates


When the risks are so high, what would you do?

Blog entry by Daul Jang | 21 October, 2015 2 comments

Five Greenpeace activists last week entered the security zone of what will soon be the world's biggest nuclear power plant - the Kori nuclear power plant (NPP) near Busan in South Korea. Arriving via a black inflatable boat, they...

Fukushima worker diagnosed with "acute" leukaemia due to radiation exposure

Blog entry by Justin McKeating | 20 October, 2015 6 comments

Japan's government confirms a worker has developed leukaemia as a result of working on the clean-up at the Fukushima nuclear power plant. There's terrible news from Japan today: Japan's health ministry announced that a...

Second reactor restart: Japan pushes forward with obsolete and risky nuclear power

Blog entry by Justin McKeating | 15 October, 2015 2 comments

Today's restart of the Sendai 2 nuclear reactor shows yet again President Abe's disregard for public safety as his government clings to outdated and risky nuclear power. Here's the thing: Neither of the two nuclear reactors...

The insane plan to expand the world’s biggest nuclear plant

Blog entry by Daul Jang | 13 October, 2015 22 comments

Over 3 million people live within 30 km of what is set to become the largest nuclear power plant in South Korea and the world. So why is the government expanding nuclear and locking out safe, clean renewables? Two inflatables...

International Atomic Energy Agency’s Fukushima Report puts the interests of the...

Blog entry by Justin McKeating | 24 September, 2015 5 comments

The recently released IAEA Fukushima Daiichi Accident Report on Japan’s on-going nuclear disaster in the wake of the 2011 triple reactor core meltdowns and catastrophic containment building failure reads more like nuclear industry...

VIDEO: Watch Greenpeace prank Finland's prime minister

Blog entry by Justin McKeating | 8 September, 2015 6 comments

See what happened when a Greenpeace activist turned himself into a representative of Russian nuclear company Rosatom and participated in a gala dinner with the Finnish prime minister. The Tsar Bomba our guy Dima speaks about...

Nuclear is not the answer to the phase-out of fossil fuels

Blog entry by Joanna Mills | 2 September, 2015 3 comments

A hundred and sixty thousand people made homeless, with limited compensation and the prospect for many tens of thousands of never returning to their former homes. That's not the cost of a war, but of the Fukushima nuclear accident...

Volcano poses no threat to the Sendai nuclear plant – yep, we’ve heard that one before

Blog entry | 20 August, 2015 5 comments

After being nuclear free for two years, Japan is restarting its reactors. But there’s a problem – they’re old, unsafe, and oh, did we tell you there’s an active volcano nearby? At the southwestern tip of Japan in Kagoshima...

Hiroshima and Nagasaki: remembering the power of peace

Blog entry by Kumi Naidoo | 6 August, 2015 4 comments

More than most, Japan is a nation whose modern history is tragically linked to the quest to use and tame nuclear power. This nuclear history is not noteworthy for its successes, but for how it reflects humanity's capacity for ...

Japan's nuclear history and the power of peace

Blog entry by Junichi Sato | 6 August, 2015 3 comments

The fight against nuclear is steeped in Greenpeace history. On the 70th anniversary of the Hiroshima bombings we're reminded of the consequences of nuclear energy and the people's movement to campaign for nuclear disarmament to create...

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