Monica Laflamme

Monica Laflamme - Canada

I live in Toronto Canada, but I’m originally from Kobe Japan, and I have lots of family and friends here. So when the Fukushima nuclear disaster happened it was a scary event for me. There are a couple of reactors close to Toronto, less than 30km from where I live now, and like Japan, our government is pushing ahead with nuclear without thinking through the risks properly. What happened in Fukushima can happen anywhere. This is a problem that affects all of the world, not just Japan, and we need to stop nukes now.

 

Daniel Szonyi

Daniel Szonyi - Hungary

They say: “If you climb Mount Fuji once, you are a wise man.” I say; if you keep using nuclear power you are a fool.
My name is Donci and I am climbing on this amazing Japanese mountain to show my solidarity with those affected in the last year by the disaster and to tell my government that keeping the Paks nuclear power plant instead of investing in the renewable energy sector is not just dangerous and expensive, but it is also a fool’s choice.

 

Tomasz Dziemianczuk

Tomasz Dziemianczuk - Poland

I am climbing Mt Fuji to show my disagreement to the Polish government’s plans to build the first nuclear power plant in my country. I think nuclear energy is a threat to mankind and the Chernobyl and Fukushima disasters have proven that. It is not safe and it is not cheap, as some might say. I wish Poland invested into renewable energy the same money they are planning to spend on a new power plant. I also do not believe in saying that building power plants would increase the employment rate as there would be only jobs for a small number of scientists and specialists.

 

Mateo Perez Garcia

Mateo Perez Garcia - Spain

Hello. I’m Mateo from the south of Spain. I’m climbing Mt Fuji to make sure that accidents like Fukushima are not forgotten. I don’t want to leave future generations a legacy of nuclear waste.

 

Arnaud Durand

Arnaud Durand - France

I am from France, the most nuclear-ised country in the world. The future is terrifying; the population does not seem to be aware that the disasters that happened in Fukushima and Chernobyl are also possible in any country that has nuclear energy. I want to protest and show solidarity with the people of Japan. A future without nukes and EPR is possible.

 

Christian Schmutz

Christian Schmutz - Switzerland

I am from Switzerland, the country with the oldest nuclear power plant in the world (Beznau). Here in Japan, the country of Fukushima, I am taking a stand for a nuclear-free, renewable future – all over the world!

 

Francois-Xavier Bleau

Francois-Xavier Bleau -  Canada

I am here to show, by climbing the iconic Mt Fuji, that nuclear power is a real danger in Japan, and everywhere in the world. We cannot live with this risk. The only control we have over the dangers of nuclear energy is to simply refuse it and make room for alternative sources of energy.

 

Alessio Ponza

Alessio Ponza - Italy

I’m Alessio, and first I’m here to show solidarity with the Fukushima people. I’m from Italy, a land less seismically-active than Japan, and we have already stopped with nuclear energy. I want to suggest to the Japanese people that they can pressure their government to stop gambling with nuclear power and switch to renewable energy. An energy revolution is both possible and necessary for future generations.

The latest updates

 

Fukushima Fallout

Publication | 15 February, 2013 at 23:30

From the beginning of the use of nuclear power to produce electricity 60 years ago, the nuclear industry has been protected from paying the full costs of its failures. Governments have created a system that protects the profits of companies while...

Beyond Nuclear

Publication | 6 February, 2013 at 0:30

After decades of market dominance, high profitability and the creation of strong shareholder value, Japan's nuclear utilities have seen their fortunes turn in the wake of the Fukushima nuclear disaster.

Toxic Assets

Publication | 12 June, 2012 at 6:00

This report looks at the March 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster from an investors’ point of view. It identifies the long-known technological, management, governance and other institutional deficiencies that were instrumental in turning a predicted...

Lessons from Fukushima

Publication | 28 February, 2012 at 2:00

It has been almost 12 months since the Fukushima nuclear disaster began. Although the Great East Japan earthquake and the following tsunami triggered it, the key causes of the nuclear accident lie in the institutional failures of political...

Shadowlands

Publication | 19 February, 2012 at 23:00

On 11 March 2011 the lives of hundreds of thousands of people in Japan changed forever. An earthquake and tsunami destroyed towns and villages on the northeast coast. Some 20,000 people died. Greenpeace visited people affected by the Fukushima...

EPR-Nuclear-Reactor-2012

Publication | 6 February, 2012 at 15:57

An update of the 2008 Greenpeace International briefing on the EPR reactor. We have added some of the many new design and construction errors and the economic setbacks the EPR has run into. We also include more information on the tremendous gains...

G8 Climate and Energy Action Checklist 2011

Publication | 25 May, 2011 at 11:20

G8 leaders have a unique opportunity to drive a renewable energy revolution and prevent catastrophic climate change. To be considered a success, the G8 must meet the demands in the Greenpeace G8 Checklist.

Chernobyl field findings - 25 years later

Publication | 7 April, 2011 at 9:00

In the early morning of 26 April 1986, a major nuclear accident occurred in reactor number 4 at the Chernobyl nuclear power station in Ukraine. The reactor’s explosion and subsequent burning went down in history as the world’s worst civilian...

Fukushima – INES scale rating

Publication | 25 March, 2011 at 19:15

A new analysis prepared for Greenpeace Germany by nuclear safety expert Dr Helmut Hirsch shows that by March 23 2011, Japan’s nuclear crisis has already released enough radioactivity to be ranked at Level 7 on the International Nuclear Event...

Nuclear Banks, No Thanks!

Publication | 10 August, 2010 at 11:30

Nuclear power is not only the most controversial and dangerous form of energy generation, it is also one of the most expensive. To raise the many billions of euros needed to build even a single nuclear reactor, utility companies therefore rely...

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