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Captive bluefin tuna inside a transport cage. The cage is being towed by a tug from fishing grounds in Libya to Tuna farms in Sicily.

Sustainable Aquaculture

Greenpeace seeks to ensure clean and healthy oceans for the future, and part of this is working to improve the standards of international seafood trade. As wild stocks decline, the demand for farmed shrimp, salmon, tuna, tilapia and other marine finfish is on the rise. Therefore, due to its sheer size and its impacts on the oceans, the aquaculture industry is an important part of the overall picture.

Aquaculture is not a solution to overfishing. Traditional forms of aquaculture can and do make substantial contributions to food supplies in areas of the world where food needs are acute, but these need to be sustainable.

Many modern aquaculture practices emphasise the unsustainable production of species for high-value export markets. Rapid development and expansion of intensive aquaculture for species such as salmon and shrimp has, for example, resulted in widespread degradation of the environment and the displacement of coastal fishing and farming communities.

Unsustainable aquaculture also negatively impacts on the food supplies and food security of developing coastal countries. Aquaculture development often blocks access to common lands, used by local people for fishing and cleaning (collecting of seafood from the ground), and takes away traditional food sources, for use in fishmeal and oil production for aquaculture production. 

What are the main problems with aquaculture? 

Unsustainable aquaculture can devastate our oceans and the environment and impact on local people's food and security.

Some examples include:

  • the extraction of marine species from oceans, including wild juveniles vital for future stock growth, increasing the burden on wild fish stocks and having major food security implications;
  • fishmeal and so-called 'trash fish' used for feed production - often the main food for local people - taken for use in aquaculture ponds;
  • the release of organic wastes (that, for instance, act as plant nutrients for harmful algal blooms) and toxic effluents into the oceans;
  • the destruction of coastal ecosystems, displacement of coastal communities and depletion of fresh water sources to build aquaculture ponds.

What kind of aquaculture is sustainable?   

There are no species that are sustainable as such. The sustainability of a species depends on its feeding and lifecycle habits, as well as the farming operation. Only species that are plant eaters, who can breed in captivity, and whose farming does not produce high levels of nutrient output can be cultivated sustainably.

There are a number of conditions an aquaculture operation must adhere to in order to be sustainable. Among other things, an aquaculture operation can only be regarded as sustainable if it:

  • is continually moving towards plant-based feeds originating from sustainable agriculture;
  • does not use fishmeal or fish-oil-based feeds from unsustainable fisheries and does not represent a net loss in fish protein yield;
  • does not use wild-caught juveniles;
  • only cultivates species that are native in open water systems, and then only in bag nets, closed-wall sea-pens or equivalent systems (if there is cultivation of non-native species, it must be restricted to land-based tanks);
  • does not result in negative environmental impacts in terms of discharges and effluents to the surrounding areas;
  • does not result in negative effects to local wildlife (plants as well as animals) or represents a risk to local wild populations;
  • does not use genetically engineered fish or feed;
  • uses stocking densities that minimise the risk of disease outbreaks and transmission;
  • does not deplete local resources, for example, drinking water supplies and mangrove forests;
  • does not threaten human health;
  • supports the long-term economic and social well-being of local communities.

Achieving sustainability requires adhering to a full set of measures and cannot be reached through simply implementing one or two. 

How can consumers be sure that the products they buy come from sustainable and fair aquaculture?

No current certification scheme covers all of the issues essential to ensure products come from sustainable and fair aquaculture operations. It is the responsibility of retailers to ensure that the products they buy come from operations adhering to the conditions described above. Retailers must, until a reliable certification system is in place, communicate to their customersthe sustainability of their products.

In turn, customers must also challenge their retailers to ensure that their supplies stick to all of these conditions. Unless consumers can be assured that products come from sustainable operations, they should not buy them.

The Greenpeace report, Challenging the aquaculture industry on sustainability, offers advice to the industry on becoming sustainable, and provides guidelines to retailers and seafood suppliers on how to ensure they only buy aquaculture products from sustainable operations. 

The latest updates

 

The people behind your can of sustainable tuna

Blog entry by Sari Tolvanen | 11 December, 2012 2 comments

The fishermen's days festival in the Maldives is being held this week, a three-day festival to celebrate the country’s fishermen who catch the country's tuna bounty using pole and line fishing. To celebrate one of the few truly...

Catching Tuna in the Maldives

Blog entry by Andrea Rid | 3 November, 2012 8 comments

Today, I caught a tuna. It was the first fish I had ever caught in my life. And the first tuna that had to die because of me for a long time. I haven’t eaten tuna for about three years. Not because I don’t like the taste of it –...

It's time for Mauritius to take ownership of its oceans

Blog entry by Simon Clydesdale | 16 October, 2012 1 comment

The Greenpeace flagship Rainbow Warrior has spent the past few days hosting all the key players in one of the Indian Ocean's prime tuna hubs – Port Louis in Mauritius. This is a welcome turnaround. Just a few days ago it didn’t...

Local Fishermen in Mauritius

Slideshow | 16 October, 2012

Taiwanese people want fish for the future

Blog entry by Tamara Stark, Greenpeace International | 3 October, 2012 5 comments

The warmth of the sun overhead mirrored the warmth of the welcome we received this morning from officials in Keelung, Taiwan. The day dawned sunny, despite warnings of a typhoon moving in on Taiwan, and our press conference to launch...

Spanish Longliner Herdusa no.1 Vigo

Slideshow | 2 October, 2012

"Dongwon's Destructive Fishing Starts Here"

Image | 23 September, 2012 at 18:00

Greenpeace activists unfurl a giant banner reading: "Dongwon's Destructive Fishing Starts Here", in front of the purse seine fishing vessel, 'MV Granada', belonging to Dongwon Industries, South Korea's largest canned tuna company, at the port of...

It’s time for fewer tuna fishing boats, not empty promises

Blog entry by Sari Tolvanen | 12 June, 2012 1 comment

There is consensus. Too many big tuna fishing boats are chasing declining tuna populations. Environmentalists know this; the tuna industry knows it and governments, scientists and fishermen know that if we want fish tomorrow, we need...

Defending our oceans every day

Blog entry by Richard Page | 8 June, 2012 1 comment

Today is World Oceans Day, the day we celebrate all that the oceans give us. They provide humankind with food, jobs and the oxygen we breathe. If we are to survive on this planet, we need living oceans. However, decades of destructive...

We need fewer boats, more fish to save our oceans

Blog entry by Mark Dia, Greenpeace Southeast Asia | 25 May, 2012 2 comments

I’m here in Bangkok at a gathering of hundreds of tuna business officials , policy-makers and even a few environmental advocates like myself. It’s been a long week of discussion about the future of the industry, including a lot about...

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