Greener Electronics

Every year, hundreds of thousands of old computers and mobile phones are dumped in landfills or burned in smelters. Thousands more are exported, often illegally, from the Europe, US, Japan and other industrialised countries, to Asia. There, workers at scrap yards, some of whom are children, are exposed to a cocktail of toxic chemicals and poisons.

A Chinese child sits amongst a pile of wires and e-waste. Children can often be found dismantling e-waste containing many hazardous chemicals known to be potentially very damaging to children's health.

The rate at which these mountains of obsolete electronic products are growing will reach crisis proportions unless electronics corporations that profit from making and selling these devices face up to their responsibilities.

It is possible to make clean, durable products that can be upgraded, recycled, or disposed of safely and don't end up as hazardous waste in someone's backyard.

Discover more about e-waste, what happens after it is thrown away, which companies are top and bottom of the toxic product class and the solutions to the problem.

The latest updates

 

Greenpeace activists unfold banner

Image | March 29, 2010 at 16:25

Greenpeace activists unfold a banner on the head quarters of Dell in Denmark this afternoon where Michael Dell meets with his senior management team.

Activists at Dell HQ in Denmark

Image | March 29, 2010 at 16:24

Greenpeace activists unfold a banner on the head quarters of Dell in Denmark this afternoon where Michael Dell meets with his senior management team.

Banner at Dell HQ in Denmark

Image | March 29, 2010 at 16:24

Greenpeace activists unfold a banner on the head quarters of Dell in Denmark this afternoon where Michael Dell meets with his senior management team.

Protest at Dell HQ in Bangalore

Image | March 29, 2010 at 15:09

Greenpeace activists protest outside Dell offices for failing to fulfill their promise to phase out Toxic material from their products.

Greenpeace asks Dell director

Image | March 29, 2010 at 15:07

Greenpeace asks the managing director of Dell, Michael Dell, to stop using toxic components in his company's electronics.

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