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Polluting waste incinerator near local community in East Liverpool.

Incineration

Society continues to generate more waste and to change this alarming trend; strong political and industrial measures are urgently needed.

Despite what industry and governments would like people to believe,incineration is not a solution to the world's waste problems, but partof the problem.

Incinerators may reduce the volume of solid waste, but they do notdispose of the toxic substances contained in the waste. They create thelargest source of dioxins, which is one of the most toxic chemicalsknown to science.

Incinerators emit a wide range of pollutants in their stack gases,ashes and other residues. The filters used to clean incinerator stackgases produce solid and liquid toxic wastes, which also need to bedisposed.

The only way to improve the situation is to avoid toxic waste production by improving our products and processes.

Public opposition to incineration isgrowing worldwide. People are recognising that there is no place forthe incineration of waste in a sustainable society.

The latest updates

 

Your home garden at the bees' peril

Blog entry by Matthias Wüthrich | 25 April, 2014

With spring comes home-gardening and lovingly tending to the outdoor flowers and plants you bought at the home hardware or ‘do-it-yourself’ store. Unfortunately, bees may not love your garden as much as you do.  After an analysis of...

A Toxic Eden

Publication | 24 April, 2014 at 12:13

This study reports results from the laboratory analysis of ornamental plants sourced from garden centres, supermarkets and DIY-stores in ten European countries.

Turning fashion InsideOut

Blog entry by Robin Perkins | 24 April, 2014 2 comments

On the anniversary of the Rana Plaza disaster, one of the worst industrial accidents in recent history, a global collective of celebrities, designers, fashionistas, academics and NGOs are today joining forces to call for radical...

Apple's Tim Cook sets bar for corporate climate leadership

Blog entry by David Pomerantz | 23 April, 2014 2 comments

Earlier this month, the world’s top climate scientists reiterated that we are on a path to permanently change our planet, reporting that people on every continent are already feeling the impacts of global warming. If we are to preserve...

Why shop when you can swap?

Blog entry by Ieva Vilimaviciute | 23 April, 2014 1 comment

Thinking about freshening up your wardrobe before the summer? Forget shopping – it’s time for a clothes swap! Whether you are a green-dressing fashionista concerned about fashion’s footprint or just simply love shopping, clothes...

Of Solutions and Commitments: Going the Distance in the Great Bear Rainforest

Blog entry by Eduardo Sousa | 22 April, 2014

Last week Greenpeace launched Forest Solutions: An insider’s look at Greenpeace collaborations in forest regions around the world. Eduardo Sousa, a Senior Forests Campaigner for Greenpeace shares his perspectives on the Great Bear...

Atom Solar Suntrolley is here!

Blog entry by Ruhie Kumar | 17 April, 2014

What happens when a design for a solar water pump is actually implemented? The innovation challenge ran from September to November, 2013, with three winners from across the world - Canada, Hungary and India. Recently, one of the...

The Bees' Burden: why bees need our help and we need the help of bees

Blog entry by Matthias Wüthrich | 16 April, 2014 15 comments

Bees are considered to be the "queens of biodiversity" but bee populations continue to decline as a result of a broken industrial agricultural system which intensively uses chemicals and large monoculture plantations -- a system which...

There are no human rights on a dead planet

Blog entry by Kumi Naidoo | 16 April, 2014 3 comments

Yesterday I spoke at the International Association of Democratic Lawyers congress in Brussels. In the audience there were over 500 hundred progressive lawyers from over 50 countries. Many of these lawyers focus on human rights issues...

The Bees' Burden

Publication | 16 April, 2014 at 7:30

This study reports concentrations of pesticides found in pollen brought back to hives by foraging bees, and sampled using pollen traps or direct from the comb. This is one of the most extensive studies of pesticides in bee-collected pollen...

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